Merge tag 'tpmdd-next-20190625' of git://git.infradead.org/users/jjs/linux-tpmdd
authorLinus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
Tue, 9 Jul 2019 01:47:42 +0000 (18:47 -0700)
committerLinus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
Tue, 9 Jul 2019 01:47:42 +0000 (18:47 -0700)
Pull tpm updates from Jarkko Sakkinen:
 "This contains two critical bug fixes and support for obtaining TPM
  events triggered by ExitBootServices().

  For the latter I have to give a quite verbose explanation not least
  because I had to revisit all the details myself to remember what was
  going on in Matthew's patches.

  The preboot software stack maintains an event log that gets entries
  every time something gets hashed to any of the PCR registers. What
  gets hashed could be a component to be run or perhaps log of some
  actions taken just to give couple of coarse examples. In general,
  anything relevant for the boot process that the preboot software does
  gets hashed and a log entry with a specific event type [1].

  The main application for this is remote attestation and the reason why
  it is useful is nicely put in the very first section of [1]:

     "Attestation is used to provide information about the platform’s
      state to a challenger. However, PCR contents are difficult to
      interpret; therefore, attestation is typically more useful when
      the PCR contents are accompanied by a measurement log. While not
      trusted on their own, the measurement log contains a richer set of
      information than do the PCR contents. The PCR contents are used to
      provide the validation of the measurement log."

  Because EFI_TCG2_PROTOCOL.GetEventLog() is not available after calling
  ExitBootServices(), Linux EFI stub copies the event log to a custom
  configuration table. Unfortunately, ExitBootServices() also generates
  events and obviously these events do not get copied to that table.
  Luckily firmware does this for us by providing a configuration table
  identified by EFI_TCG2_FINAL_EVENTS_TABLE_GUID.

  This essentially contains necessary changes to provide the full event
  log for the use the user space that is concatenated from these two
  partial event logs [2]"

[1] https://trustedcomputinggroup.org/resource/pc-client-specific-platform-firmware-profile-specification/
[2] The final concatenation is done in drivers/char/tpm/eventlog/efi.c

* tag 'tpmdd-next-20190625' of git://git.infradead.org/users/jjs/linux-tpmdd:
  tpm: Don't duplicate events from the final event log in the TCG2 log
  Abstract out support for locating an EFI config table
  tpm: Fix TPM 1.2 Shutdown sequence to prevent future TPM operations
  efi: Attempt to get the TCG2 event log in the boot stub
  tpm: Append the final event log to the TPM event log
  tpm: Reserve the TPM final events table
  tpm: Abstract crypto agile event size calculations
  tpm: Actually fail on TPM errors during "get random"

840 files changed:
Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-bus-css
Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-devices-system-cpu
Documentation/RCU/rcuref.txt
Documentation/RCU/stallwarn.txt
Documentation/RCU/whatisRCU.txt
Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt
Documentation/arm64/elf_hwcaps.txt
Documentation/atomic_t.txt
Documentation/core-api/circular-buffers.rst
Documentation/core-api/timekeeping.rst
Documentation/cputopology.txt
Documentation/devicetree/bindings/interrupt-controller/amazon,al-fic.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/devicetree/bindings/interrupt-controller/amlogic,meson-gpio-intc.txt
Documentation/devicetree/bindings/interrupt-controller/csky,mpintc.txt
Documentation/devicetree/bindings/interrupt-controller/renesas,rza1-irqc.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/devicetree/bindings/perf/fsl-imx-ddr.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/devicetree/bindings/riscv/cpus.yaml
Documentation/devicetree/bindings/timer/nxp,sysctr-timer.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/driver-api/s390-drivers.rst
Documentation/filesystems/proc.txt
Documentation/locking/lockdep-design.txt
Documentation/memory-barriers.txt
Documentation/process/changes.rst
Documentation/s390/3270.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/3270.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/CommonIO [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/DASD [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/Debugging390.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/cds.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/cds.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/common_io.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/dasd.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/debugging390.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/driver-model.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/driver-model.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/index.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/monreader.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/monreader.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/qeth.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/qeth.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/s390dbf.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/s390dbf.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/text_files.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/vfio-ap.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/vfio-ap.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/vfio-ccw.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/vfio-ccw.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/s390/zfcpdump.rst [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/s390/zfcpdump.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/scheduler/sched-pelt.c
Documentation/sysctl/kernel.txt
Documentation/translations/ko_KR/memory-barriers.txt
Documentation/x86/exception-tables.rst
Documentation/x86/topology.rst
MAINTAINERS
Makefile
arch/alpha/include/asm/atomic.h
arch/alpha/kernel/smp.c
arch/alpha/oprofile/common.c
arch/arc/Makefile
arch/arc/include/asm/atomic.h
arch/arc/plat-hsdk/platform.c
arch/arm/boot/dts/armada-xp-98dx3236.dtsi
arch/arm/boot/dts/gemini-dlink-dir-685.dts
arch/arm/boot/dts/gemini-dlink-dns-313.dts
arch/arm/boot/dts/imx6ul.dtsi
arch/arm/boot/dts/meson8.dtsi
arch/arm/boot/dts/meson8b.dtsi
arch/arm/common/bL_switcher.c
arch/arm/include/asm/arch_timer.h
arch/arm/include/asm/atomic.h
arch/arm/kernel/topology.c
arch/arm/mach-davinci/board-da830-evm.c
arch/arm/mach-davinci/board-omapl138-hawk.c
arch/arm/mach-omap2/prm3xxx.c
arch/arm64/Kconfig
arch/arm64/Makefile
arch/arm64/boot/dts/freescale/fsl-ls1028a.dtsi
arch/arm64/configs/defconfig
arch/arm64/include/asm/acpi.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/arch_gicv3.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/arch_timer.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/atomic_ll_sc.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/atomic_lse.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/cache.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/cacheflush.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/cpufeature.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/daifflags.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/elf.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/fpsimd.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/hwcap.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/irqflags.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/kvm_host.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/pgtable-hwdef.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/pgtable-prot.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/pgtable.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/ptrace.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/signal32.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/simd.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/sysreg.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/thread_info.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/unistd.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/vdso.h
arch/arm64/include/asm/vdso/compat_barrier.h [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/include/asm/vdso/compat_gettimeofday.h [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/include/asm/vdso/gettimeofday.h [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/include/asm/vdso/vsyscall.h [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/include/uapi/asm/hwcap.h
arch/arm64/include/uapi/asm/ptrace.h
arch/arm64/kernel/Makefile
arch/arm64/kernel/acpi.c
arch/arm64/kernel/asm-offsets.c
arch/arm64/kernel/cacheinfo.c
arch/arm64/kernel/cpufeature.c
arch/arm64/kernel/cpuinfo.c
arch/arm64/kernel/entry.S
arch/arm64/kernel/fpsimd.c
arch/arm64/kernel/image.h
arch/arm64/kernel/irq.c
arch/arm64/kernel/module.c
arch/arm64/kernel/probes/kprobes.c
arch/arm64/kernel/process.c
arch/arm64/kernel/ptrace.c
arch/arm64/kernel/signal32.c
arch/arm64/kernel/sleep.S
arch/arm64/kernel/smp.c
arch/arm64/kernel/traps.c
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso.c
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso/Makefile
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso/gettimeofday.S
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso/vgettimeofday.c [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso32/.gitignore [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso32/Makefile [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso32/note.c [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso32/sigreturn.S [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso32/vdso.S [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso32/vdso.lds.S [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/kernel/vdso32/vgettimeofday.c [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/arm64/kvm/fpsimd.c
arch/arm64/kvm/guest.c
arch/arm64/kvm/hyp/switch.c
arch/arm64/mm/dma-mapping.c
arch/arm64/mm/fault.c
arch/arm64/mm/hugetlbpage.c
arch/arm64/mm/init.c
arch/arm64/mm/mmu.c
arch/arm64/mm/pageattr.c
arch/arm64/net/bpf_jit_comp.c
arch/csky/kernel/signal.c
arch/ia64/include/asm/atomic.h
arch/ia64/kernel/mca.c
arch/ia64/kernel/perfmon.c
arch/ia64/kernel/uncached.c
arch/m68k/Kconfig
arch/m68k/configs/amiga_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/apollo_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/atari_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/bvme6000_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/hp300_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/mac_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/multi_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/mvme147_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/mvme16x_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/q40_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/sun3_defconfig
arch/m68k/configs/sun3x_defconfig
arch/m68k/kernel/dma.c
arch/mips/Makefile
arch/mips/boot/compressed/Makefile
arch/mips/boot/compressed/calc_vmlinuz_load_addr.c
arch/mips/include/asm/atomic.h
arch/mips/include/asm/mach-ath79/ar933x_uart.h
arch/mips/include/asm/mips-gic.h
arch/mips/include/asm/switch_to.h
arch/mips/kernel/mips-mt-fpaff.c
arch/mips/kernel/traps.c
arch/mips/mm/mmap.c
arch/mips/mm/tlbex.c
arch/parisc/kernel/module.c
arch/powerpc/include/asm/atomic.h
arch/powerpc/include/asm/processor.h
arch/powerpc/kernel/exceptions-64s.S
arch/powerpc/kernel/ptrace.c
arch/powerpc/kernel/rtas.c
arch/powerpc/platforms/cell/spufs/sched.c
arch/riscv/boot/dts/sifive/fu540-c000.dtsi
arch/riscv/boot/dts/sifive/hifive-unleashed-a00.dts
arch/riscv/configs/defconfig
arch/riscv/include/asm/atomic.h
arch/riscv/mm/fault.c
arch/s390/Kconfig
arch/s390/configs/debug_defconfig
arch/s390/configs/defconfig
arch/s390/configs/performance_defconfig [deleted file]
arch/s390/configs/zfcpdump_defconfig
arch/s390/crypto/ghash_s390.c
arch/s390/crypto/prng.c
arch/s390/crypto/sha1_s390.c
arch/s390/crypto/sha256_s390.c
arch/s390/crypto/sha512_s390.c
arch/s390/include/asm/airq.h
arch/s390/include/asm/atomic.h
arch/s390/include/asm/ccwdev.h
arch/s390/include/asm/cio.h
arch/s390/include/asm/ctl_reg.h
arch/s390/include/asm/debug.h
arch/s390/include/asm/facility.h
arch/s390/include/asm/idals.h
arch/s390/include/asm/kvm_host.h
arch/s390/include/asm/mem_encrypt.h [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/s390/include/asm/pci.h
arch/s390/include/asm/percpu.h
arch/s390/include/asm/processor.h
arch/s390/include/asm/smp.h
arch/s390/include/asm/spinlock.h
arch/s390/include/asm/tlbflush.h
arch/s390/include/asm/unwind.h
arch/s390/include/uapi/asm/runtime_instr.h
arch/s390/kernel/Makefile
arch/s390/kernel/debug.c
arch/s390/kernel/dis.c
arch/s390/kernel/dumpstack.c
arch/s390/kernel/entry.S
arch/s390/kernel/jump_label.c
arch/s390/kernel/machine_kexec.c
arch/s390/kernel/processor.c
arch/s390/kernel/setup.c
arch/s390/kernel/smp.c
arch/s390/kernel/swsusp.S
arch/s390/kernel/traps.c
arch/s390/kernel/unwind_bc.c
arch/s390/kvm/kvm-s390.c
arch/s390/kvm/priv.c
arch/s390/lib/Makefile
arch/s390/mm/init.c
arch/s390/mm/maccess.c
arch/s390/mm/mmap.c
arch/s390/pci/pci.c
arch/s390/pci/pci_clp.c
arch/s390/pci/pci_debug.c
arch/s390/purgatory/.gitignore
arch/s390/tools/Makefile
arch/s390/tools/opcodes.txt
arch/sparc/include/asm/atomic_64.h
arch/x86/Kconfig
arch/x86/Kconfig.cpu
arch/x86/Kconfig.debug
arch/x86/configs/i386_defconfig
arch/x86/configs/x86_64_defconfig
arch/x86/entry/calling.h
arch/x86/entry/common.c
arch/x86/entry/entry_32.S
arch/x86/entry/entry_64.S
arch/x86/entry/vdso/Makefile
arch/x86/entry/vdso/vclock_gettime.c
arch/x86/entry/vdso/vdso.lds.S
arch/x86/entry/vdso/vdso32/vdso32.lds.S
arch/x86/entry/vdso/vdsox32.lds.S
arch/x86/entry/vdso/vma.c
arch/x86/entry/vsyscall/Makefile
arch/x86/entry/vsyscall/vsyscall_64.c
arch/x86/entry/vsyscall/vsyscall_gtod.c [deleted file]
arch/x86/events/core.c
arch/x86/events/intel/cstate.c
arch/x86/events/intel/ds.c
arch/x86/events/intel/rapl.c
arch/x86/events/intel/uncore.c
arch/x86/events/intel/uncore.h
arch/x86/events/intel/uncore_snbep.c
arch/x86/events/perf_event.h
arch/x86/hyperv/hv_init.c
arch/x86/include/asm/acrn.h [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/x86/include/asm/apic.h
arch/x86/include/asm/atomic.h
arch/x86/include/asm/atomic64_32.h
arch/x86/include/asm/atomic64_64.h
arch/x86/include/asm/barrier.h
arch/x86/include/asm/cpufeature.h
arch/x86/include/asm/cpufeatures.h
arch/x86/include/asm/fpu/xstate.h
arch/x86/include/asm/frame.h
arch/x86/include/asm/hardirq.h
arch/x86/include/asm/hpet.h
arch/x86/include/asm/hw_irq.h
arch/x86/include/asm/hyperv-tlfs.h
arch/x86/include/asm/hypervisor.h
arch/x86/include/asm/intel-family.h
arch/x86/include/asm/irq_regs.h
arch/x86/include/asm/jump_label.h
arch/x86/include/asm/kexec.h
arch/x86/include/asm/mshyperv.h
arch/x86/include/asm/msr-index.h
arch/x86/include/asm/mwait.h
arch/x86/include/asm/paravirt_types.h
arch/x86/include/asm/percpu.h
arch/x86/include/asm/processor.h
arch/x86/include/asm/ptrace.h
arch/x86/include/asm/pvclock.h
arch/x86/include/asm/smp.h
arch/x86/include/asm/special_insns.h
arch/x86/include/asm/stacktrace.h
arch/x86/include/asm/text-patching.h
arch/x86/include/asm/time.h
arch/x86/include/asm/topology.h
arch/x86/include/asm/vdso/gettimeofday.h [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/x86/include/asm/vdso/vsyscall.h [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/x86/include/asm/vgtod.h
arch/x86/include/asm/vsyscall.h
arch/x86/include/asm/vvar.h
arch/x86/include/uapi/asm/perf_regs.h
arch/x86/kernel/Makefile
arch/x86/kernel/acpi/cstate.c
arch/x86/kernel/alternative.c
arch/x86/kernel/amd_nb.c
arch/x86/kernel/apic/apic.c
arch/x86/kernel/apic/apic_flat_64.c
arch/x86/kernel/apic/io_apic.c
arch/x86/kernel/apic/msi.c
arch/x86/kernel/apic/vector.c
arch/x86/kernel/apic/x2apic_cluster.c
arch/x86/kernel/asm-offsets.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/Makefile
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/acrn.c [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/aperfmperf.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/bugs.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/cacheinfo.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/common.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/cpuid-deps.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/hypervisor.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/intel.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/mce/amd.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/mce/core.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/mce/inject.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/mce/internal.h
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/mce/severity.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/microcode/core.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/mkcapflags.sh
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/mshyperv.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/mtrr/generic.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/resctrl/pseudo_lock.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/resctrl/rdtgroup.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/scattered.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/topology.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/umwait.c [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/vmware.c
arch/x86/kernel/cpu/zhaoxin.c [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/x86/kernel/crash.c
arch/x86/kernel/fpu/core.c
arch/x86/kernel/fpu/init.c
arch/x86/kernel/fpu/xstate.c
arch/x86/kernel/ftrace.c
arch/x86/kernel/ftrace_32.S
arch/x86/kernel/ftrace_64.S
arch/x86/kernel/head64.c
arch/x86/kernel/hpet.c
arch/x86/kernel/i8253.c
arch/x86/kernel/idt.c
arch/x86/kernel/io_delay.c
arch/x86/kernel/irq.c
arch/x86/kernel/jailhouse.c
arch/x86/kernel/jump_label.c
arch/x86/kernel/kgdb.c
arch/x86/kernel/kprobes/common.h
arch/x86/kernel/kprobes/core.c
arch/x86/kernel/kprobes/opt.c
arch/x86/kernel/paravirt.c
arch/x86/kernel/paravirt_patch.c [new file with mode: 0644]
arch/x86/kernel/paravirt_patch_32.c [deleted file]
arch/x86/kernel/paravirt_patch_64.c [deleted file]
arch/x86/kernel/perf_regs.c
arch/x86/kernel/process_32.c
arch/x86/kernel/ptrace.c
arch/x86/kernel/pvclock.c
arch/x86/kernel/smp.c
arch/x86/kernel/smpboot.c
arch/x86/kernel/time.c
arch/x86/kernel/tls.c
arch/x86/kernel/tsc.c
arch/x86/kernel/tsc_msr.c
arch/x86/kernel/unwind_frame.c
arch/x86/kernel/unwind_orc.c
arch/x86/kvm/cpuid.h
arch/x86/kvm/lapic.c
arch/x86/kvm/pmu.c
arch/x86/kvm/vmx/nested.c
arch/x86/kvm/x86.c
arch/x86/lib/cache-smp.c
arch/x86/mm/fault.c
arch/x86/mm/init_64.c
arch/x86/platform/efi/quirks.c
arch/x86/platform/geode/alix.c
arch/x86/platform/geode/geos.c
arch/x86/platform/geode/net5501.c
arch/x86/ras/Kconfig
arch/x86/tools/insn_decoder_test.c
arch/x86/tools/insn_sanity.c
arch/x86/xen/Kconfig
arch/x86/xen/smp_pv.c
block/bfq-iosched.c
block/blk-mq-debugfs.c
crypto/cryptd.c
crypto/crypto_user_base.c
drivers/acpi/acpi_pad.c
drivers/acpi/irq.c
drivers/acpi/pptt.c
drivers/acpi/processor_idle.c
drivers/base/arch_topology.c
drivers/base/cacheinfo.c
drivers/base/topology.c
drivers/char/agp/generic.c
drivers/clk/clk.c
drivers/clk/meson/g12a.c
drivers/clk/meson/g12a.h
drivers/clk/meson/meson8b.c
drivers/clk/socfpga/clk-s10.c
drivers/clk/tegra/clk-tegra210.c
drivers/clk/ti/clkctrl.c
drivers/clocksource/Kconfig
drivers/clocksource/Makefile
drivers/clocksource/arc_timer.c
drivers/clocksource/arm_arch_timer.c
drivers/clocksource/exynos_mct.c
drivers/clocksource/hyperv_timer.c [new file with mode: 0644]
drivers/clocksource/timer-davinci.c [new file with mode: 0644]
drivers/clocksource/timer-imx-sysctr.c [new file with mode: 0644]
drivers/clocksource/timer-ixp4xx.c
drivers/clocksource/timer-meson6.c
drivers/clocksource/timer-tegra.c [new file with mode: 0644]
drivers/clocksource/timer-tegra20.c [deleted file]
drivers/crypto/nx/nx-842-pseries.c
drivers/dma/dma-jz4780.c
drivers/dma/imx-sdma.c
drivers/dma/qcom/bam_dma.c
drivers/firmware/efi/efi-bgrt.c
drivers/firmware/efi/efi.c
drivers/firmware/efi/efibc.c
drivers/gpio/gpio-mb86s7x.c
drivers/gpio/gpiolib-of.c
drivers/gpu/drm/amd/amdgpu/gfx_v9_0.c
drivers/gpu/drm/amd/amdkfd/kfd_chardev.c
drivers/gpu/drm/amd/powerplay/hwmgr/hwmgr.c
drivers/gpu/drm/amd/powerplay/hwmgr/process_pptables_v1_0.c
drivers/gpu/drm/amd/powerplay/inc/hwmgr.h
drivers/gpu/drm/amd/powerplay/smumgr/polaris10_smumgr.c
drivers/gpu/drm/etnaviv/etnaviv_gpu.c
drivers/gpu/drm/i915/intel_ringbuffer.c
drivers/gpu/drm/imx/ipuv3-crtc.c
drivers/gpu/drm/panfrost/panfrost_drv.c
drivers/gpu/drm/virtio/virtgpu_vq.c
drivers/hid/hid-ids.h
drivers/hid/hid-logitech-dj.c
drivers/hid/hid-multitouch.c
drivers/hid/hid-quirks.c
drivers/hid/hid-uclogic-core.c
drivers/hid/hid-uclogic-params.c
drivers/hid/intel-ish-hid/ishtp-fw-loader.c
drivers/hid/intel-ish-hid/ishtp-hid-client.c
drivers/hid/intel-ish-hid/ishtp/bus.c
drivers/hv/Kconfig
drivers/hv/hv.c
drivers/hv/hv_util.c
drivers/hv/hyperv_vmbus.h
drivers/hv/vmbus_drv.c
drivers/hwmon/coretemp.c
drivers/iio/humidity/dht11.c
drivers/iio/industrialio-core.c
drivers/infiniband/core/device.c
drivers/infiniband/hw/hfi1/affinity.c
drivers/infiniband/hw/hfi1/sdma.c
drivers/infiniband/hw/mlx4/alias_GUID.c
drivers/infiniband/hw/qib/qib_file_ops.c
drivers/irqchip/Kconfig
drivers/irqchip/Makefile
drivers/irqchip/irq-al-fic.c [new file with mode: 0644]
drivers/irqchip/irq-csky-mpintc.c
drivers/irqchip/irq-gic-v2m.c
drivers/irqchip/irq-gic-v3-its.c
drivers/irqchip/irq-gic-v3.c
drivers/irqchip/irq-mbigen.c
drivers/irqchip/irq-meson-gpio.c
drivers/irqchip/irq-mips-gic.c
drivers/irqchip/irq-renesas-intc-irqpin.c
drivers/irqchip/irq-renesas-irqc.c
drivers/irqchip/irq-renesas-rza1.c [new file with mode: 0644]
drivers/irqchip/irq-sni-exiu.c
drivers/irqchip/irq-ti-sci-inta.c
drivers/irqchip/qcom-irq-combiner.c
drivers/leds/trigger/ledtrig-activity.c
drivers/md/dm-init.c
drivers/md/dm-log-writes.c
drivers/md/dm-table.c
drivers/md/dm-verity-target.c
drivers/mtd/nand/raw/ingenic/Kconfig
drivers/mtd/nand/raw/ingenic/Makefile
drivers/mtd/nand/raw/ingenic/ingenic_ecc.c
drivers/mtd/nand/raw/ingenic/ingenic_nand.c [deleted file]
drivers/mtd/nand/raw/ingenic/ingenic_nand_drv.c [new file with mode: 0644]
drivers/mtd/nand/raw/sunxi_nand.c
drivers/mtd/nand/spi/gigadevice.c
drivers/mtd/nand/spi/macronix.c
drivers/net/bonding/bond_main.c
drivers/net/dsa/microchip/ksz_common.c
drivers/net/ethernet/aquantia/atlantic/aq_filters.c
drivers/net/ethernet/aquantia/atlantic/aq_nic.c
drivers/net/ethernet/aquantia/atlantic/aq_nic.h
drivers/net/ethernet/aquantia/atlantic/hw_atl/hw_atl_b0.c
drivers/net/ethernet/cadence/macb_main.c
drivers/net/ethernet/emulex/benet/be_ethtool.c
drivers/net/ethernet/sis/sis900.c
drivers/net/ethernet/stmicro/stmmac/stmmac_hwtstamp.c
drivers/net/ethernet/stmicro/stmmac/stmmac_main.c
drivers/net/ppp/ppp_mppe.c
drivers/net/team/team.c
drivers/net/usb/qmi_wwan.c
drivers/net/vrf.c
drivers/net/wireless/intel/iwlwifi/mvm/ftm-initiator.c
drivers/net/wireless/intel/iwlwifi/mvm/rx.c
drivers/net/wireless/intel/iwlwifi/mvm/rxmq.c
drivers/net/wireless/intel/iwlwifi/mvm/utils.c
drivers/net/wireless/mac80211_hwsim.c
drivers/net/wireless/ti/wlcore/main.c
drivers/net/wireless/ti/wlcore/rx.c
drivers/net/wireless/ti/wlcore/tx.c
drivers/net/wireless/virt_wifi.c
drivers/pci/pci-driver.c
drivers/perf/Kconfig
drivers/perf/Makefile
drivers/perf/arm_pmu_acpi.c
drivers/perf/arm_spe_pmu.c
drivers/perf/fsl_imx8_ddr_perf.c [new file with mode: 0644]
drivers/pinctrl/mediatek/mtk-eint.c
drivers/pinctrl/pinctrl-mcp23s08.c
drivers/pinctrl/pinctrl-ocelot.c
drivers/powercap/intel_rapl.c
drivers/ras/cec.c
drivers/s390/block/Kconfig
drivers/s390/block/dasd_devmap.c
drivers/s390/char/Kconfig
drivers/s390/char/Makefile
drivers/s390/char/sclp_async.c [deleted file]
drivers/s390/char/zcore.c
drivers/s390/cio/airq.c
drivers/s390/cio/ccwreq.c
drivers/s390/cio/chsc.c
drivers/s390/cio/cio.h
drivers/s390/cio/css.c
drivers/s390/cio/device.c
drivers/s390/cio/device_fsm.c
drivers/s390/cio/device_id.c
drivers/s390/cio/device_ops.c
drivers/s390/cio/device_pgid.c
drivers/s390/cio/device_status.c
drivers/s390/cio/io_sch.h
drivers/s390/cio/qdio_main.c
drivers/s390/cio/qdio_setup.c
drivers/s390/cio/qdio_thinint.c
drivers/s390/cio/vfio_ccw_cp.c
drivers/s390/cio/vfio_ccw_cp.h
drivers/s390/cio/vfio_ccw_drv.c
drivers/s390/crypto/pkey_api.c
drivers/s390/crypto/vfio_ap_drv.c
drivers/s390/crypto/vfio_ap_ops.c
drivers/s390/crypto/vfio_ap_private.h
drivers/s390/crypto/zcrypt_msgtype6.c
drivers/s390/net/Kconfig
drivers/s390/virtio/virtio_ccw.c
drivers/scsi/vmw_pvscsi.c
drivers/soc/Makefile
drivers/soc/ti/Kconfig
drivers/target/iscsi/iscsi_target_auth.c
drivers/target/target_core_iblock.c
drivers/thermal/intel/x86_pkg_temp_thermal.c
drivers/tty/tty_ldisc.c
fs/Kconfig
fs/afs/callback.c
fs/afs/inode.c
fs/afs/internal.h
fs/afs/volume.c
fs/aio.c
fs/binfmt_flat.c
fs/ceph/mds_client.c
fs/cifs/smb2ops.c
fs/cifs/smb2pdu.h
fs/dax.c
fs/eventpoll.c
fs/inode.c
fs/io_uring.c
fs/namespace.c
fs/nfs/flexfilelayout/flexfilelayoutdev.c
fs/nfsd/nfs4state.c
fs/proc/Kconfig
fs/proc/array.c
fs/proc/base.c
fs/select.c
fs/userfaultfd.c
include/asm-generic/atomic64.h
include/asm-generic/vdso/vsyscall.h [new file with mode: 0644]
include/clocksource/hyperv_timer.h [new file with mode: 0644]
include/clocksource/timer-davinci.h [new file with mode: 0644]
include/dt-bindings/clock/g12a-clkc.h
include/dt-bindings/clock/sifive-fu540-prci.h
include/linux/acpi.h
include/linux/arch_topology.h
include/linux/cacheinfo.h
include/linux/cpuhotplug.h
include/linux/device.h
include/linux/energy_model.h
include/linux/hrtimer.h
include/linux/hrtimer_defs.h [new file with mode: 0644]
include/linux/intel-ish-client-if.h
include/linux/irqchip/arm-gic-common.h
include/linux/irqchip/arm-gic.h
include/linux/jump_label.h
include/linux/kernel.h
include/linux/lockdep.h
include/linux/log2.h
include/linux/module.h
include/linux/pagemap.h
include/linux/percpu-rwsem.h
include/linux/perf/arm_pmu.h
include/linux/perf_event.h
include/linux/perf_regs.h
include/linux/pfn_t.h
include/linux/proc_fs.h
include/linux/processor.h
include/linux/rcu_sync.h
include/linux/rcupdate.h
include/linux/rwsem.h
include/linux/sched.h
include/linux/sched/nohz.h
include/linux/sched/sysctl.h
include/linux/sched/topology.h
include/linux/sched/wake_q.h
include/linux/signal.h
include/linux/smp.h
include/linux/srcutree.h
include/linux/stop_machine.h
include/linux/suspend.h
include/linux/timekeeping.h
include/linux/timer.h
include/linux/topology.h
include/linux/torture.h
include/linux/types.h
include/linux/xarray.h
include/net/cfg80211.h
include/net/ip6_route.h
include/net/route.h
include/net/tls.h
include/trace/events/sched.h
include/uapi/linux/sched.h
include/uapi/linux/sched/types.h
include/vdso/datapage.h [new file with mode: 0644]
include/vdso/helpers.h [new file with mode: 0644]
include/vdso/vsyscall.h [new file with mode: 0644]
init/Kconfig
init/init_task.c
init/initramfs.c
kernel/bpf/syscall.c
kernel/cgroup/cgroup.c
kernel/cgroup/cpuset.c
kernel/cpu.c
kernel/events/core.c
kernel/events/uprobes.c
kernel/fork.c
kernel/futex.c
kernel/irq/Makefile
kernel/irq/affinity.c
kernel/irq/autoprobe.c
kernel/irq/chip.c
kernel/irq/cpuhotplug.c
kernel/irq/internals.h
kernel/irq/irqdesc.c
kernel/irq/irqdomain.c
kernel/irq/manage.c
kernel/irq/timings.c
kernel/jump_label.c
kernel/locking/Makefile
kernel/locking/lock_events.h
kernel/locking/lock_events_list.h
kernel/locking/lockdep.c
kernel/locking/lockdep_internals.h
kernel/locking/locktorture.c
kernel/locking/percpu-rwsem.c
kernel/locking/rwsem-xadd.c [deleted file]
kernel/locking/rwsem.c
kernel/locking/rwsem.h
kernel/module.c
kernel/power/energy_model.c
kernel/power/suspend.c
kernel/ptrace.c
kernel/rcu/rcu.h
kernel/rcu/rcutorture.c
kernel/rcu/srcutree.c
kernel/rcu/sync.c
kernel/rcu/tree.c
kernel/rcu/tree.h
kernel/rcu/tree_exp.h
kernel/rcu/tree_plugin.h
kernel/rcu/tree_stall.h
kernel/rcu/update.c
kernel/sched/autogroup.c
kernel/sched/core.c
kernel/sched/cpudeadline.c
kernel/sched/cpufreq_schedutil.c
kernel/sched/cpupri.c
kernel/sched/deadline.c
kernel/sched/debug.c
kernel/sched/fair.c
kernel/sched/features.h
kernel/sched/pelt.c
kernel/sched/pelt.h
kernel/sched/rt.c
kernel/sched/sched-pelt.h
kernel/sched/sched.h
kernel/sched/topology.c
kernel/sched/wait.c
kernel/signal.c
kernel/smp.c
kernel/softirq.c
kernel/stop_machine.c
kernel/sysctl.c
kernel/time/Makefile
kernel/time/alarmtimer.c
kernel/time/clocksource.c
kernel/time/hrtimer.c
kernel/time/ntp.c
kernel/time/posix-timers.c
kernel/time/tick-sched.c
kernel/time/time.c
kernel/time/timekeeping.c
kernel/time/timer_list.c
kernel/time/vsyscall.c [new file with mode: 0644]
kernel/torture.c
kernel/trace/ftrace.c
kernel/trace/trace.c
kernel/trace/trace_hwlat.c
kernel/up.c
lib/Kconfig
lib/Kconfig.debug
lib/atomic64.c
lib/debugobjects.c
lib/devres.c
lib/idr.c
lib/mpi/mpi-pow.c
lib/raid6/s390vx.uc
lib/reed_solomon/Makefile
lib/reed_solomon/decode_rs.c
lib/reed_solomon/reed_solomon.c
lib/reed_solomon/test_rslib.c [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/smp_processor_id.c
lib/test_xarray.c
lib/vdso/Kconfig [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/vdso/Makefile [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/vdso/gettimeofday.c [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/xarray.c
mm/filemap.c
mm/huge_memory.c
mm/hugetlb.c
mm/khugepaged.c
mm/memfd.c
mm/memory-failure.c
mm/mempolicy.c
mm/migrate.c
mm/oom_kill.c
mm/page_alloc.c
mm/page_idle.c
mm/page_io.c
mm/shmem.c
mm/swap_state.c
mm/vmalloc.c
mm/vmscan.c
net/bluetooth/6lowpan.c
net/bluetooth/l2cap_core.c
net/ipv4/ip_output.c
net/ipv4/raw.c
net/ipv4/route.c
net/ipv6/ip6_output.c
net/ipv6/route.c
net/netfilter/nf_flow_table_ip.c
net/packet/af_packet.c
net/packet/internal.h
net/sched/sch_cbs.c
net/sctp/endpointola.c
net/smc/af_smc.c
net/smc/smc_core.c
net/sunrpc/xprtrdma/svc_rdma_transport.c
net/sunrpc/xprtsock.c
net/tipc/core.c
net/tipc/netlink_compat.c
net/tls/tls_main.c
samples/pidfd/pidfd-metadata.c
samples/trace_events/trace-events-sample.c
scripts/atomic/check-atomics.sh
security/apparmor/label.c
sound/core/seq/oss/seq_oss_ioctl.c
sound/core/seq/oss/seq_oss_rw.c
sound/firewire/amdtp-am824.c
sound/hda/hdac_device.c
sound/pci/hda/patch_realtek.c
sound/usb/line6/pcm.c
sound/usb/mixer_quirks.c
tools/arch/x86/include/uapi/asm/perf_regs.h
tools/include/linux/rcu.h
tools/memory-model/linux-kernel.bell
tools/memory-model/linux-kernel.cat
tools/memory-model/linux-kernel.def
tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/MP+poonceonces.litmus
tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/README
tools/memory-model/lock.cat
tools/memory-model/scripts/README
tools/memory-model/scripts/checkalllitmus.sh
tools/memory-model/scripts/checklitmus.sh
tools/memory-model/scripts/parseargs.sh
tools/memory-model/scripts/runlitmushist.sh
tools/perf/arch/x86/include/perf_regs.h
tools/perf/arch/x86/util/perf_regs.c
tools/testing/radix-tree/idr-test.c
tools/testing/radix-tree/linux/rcupdate.h
tools/testing/selftests/kvm/x86_64/evmcs_test.c
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/Makefile [new file with mode: 0644]
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/configinit.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/cpus2use.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/functions.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/jitter.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/kvm-build.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/kvm-find-errors.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/kvm-recheck.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/kvm-test-1-run.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/kvm.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/parse-build.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/bin/parse-console.sh
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/configs/rcu/CFcommon
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/configs/rcu/TREE01.boot
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/configs/rcu/TRIVIAL [new file with mode: 0644]
tools/testing/selftests/rcutorture/configs/rcu/TRIVIAL.boot [new file with mode: 0644]
tools/testing/selftests/timers/freq-step.c
tools/testing/selftests/x86/Makefile
tools/testing/selftests/x86/fsgsbase.c
tools/testing/selftests/x86/syscall_arg_fault.c
tools/testing/selftests/x86/test_vsyscall.c

index 2979c40..966f850 100644 (file)
@@ -33,3 +33,26 @@ Description: Contains the PIM/PAM/POM values, as reported by the
                in sync with the values current in the channel subsystem).
                Note: This is an I/O-subchannel specific attribute.
 Users:         s390-tools, HAL
+
+What:          /sys/bus/css/devices/.../driver_override
+Date:          June 2019
+Contact:       Cornelia Huck <cohuck@redhat.com>
+               linux-s390@vger.kernel.org
+Description:   This file allows the driver for a device to be specified. When
+               specified, only a driver with a name matching the value written
+               to driver_override will have an opportunity to bind to the
+               device. The override is specified by writing a string to the
+               driver_override file (echo vfio-ccw > driver_override) and
+               may be cleared with an empty string (echo > driver_override).
+               This returns the device to standard matching rules binding.
+               Writing to driver_override does not automatically unbind the
+               device from its current driver or make any attempt to
+               automatically load the specified driver.  If no driver with a
+               matching name is currently loaded in the kernel, the device
+               will not bind to any driver.  This also allows devices to
+               opt-out of driver binding using a driver_override name such as
+               "none".  Only a single driver may be specified in the override,
+               there is no support for parsing delimiters.
+               Note that unlike the mechanism of the same name for pci, this
+               file does not allow to override basic matching rules. I.e.,
+               the driver must still match the subchannel type of the device.
index 1528239..923fe20 100644 (file)
@@ -538,3 +538,26 @@ Description:       Intel Energy and Performance Bias Hint (EPB)
 
                This attribute is present for all online CPUs supporting the
                Intel EPB feature.
+
+What:          /sys/devices/system/cpu/umwait_control
+               /sys/devices/system/cpu/umwait_control/enable_c02
+               /sys/devices/system/cpu/umwait_control/max_time
+Date:          May 2019
+Contact:       Linux kernel mailing list <linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org>
+Description:   Umwait control
+
+               enable_c02: Read/write interface to control umwait C0.2 state
+                       Read returns C0.2 state status:
+                               0: C0.2 is disabled
+                               1: C0.2 is enabled
+
+                       Write 'y' or '1'  or 'on' to enable C0.2 state.
+                       Write 'n' or '0'  or 'off' to disable C0.2 state.
+
+                       The interface is case insensitive.
+
+               max_time: Read/write interface to control umwait maximum time
+                         in TSC-quanta that the CPU can reside in either C0.1
+                         or C0.2 state. The time is an unsigned 32-bit number.
+                         Note that a value of zero means there is no limit.
+                         Low order two bits must be zero.
index 613033f..5e6429d 100644 (file)
@@ -12,6 +12,7 @@ please read on.
 Reference counting on elements of lists which are protected by traditional
 reader/writer spinlocks or semaphores are straightforward:
 
+CODE LISTING A:
 1.                             2.
 add()                          search_and_reference()
 {                              {
@@ -28,7 +29,8 @@ add()                         search_and_reference()
 release_referenced()                   delete()
 {                                      {
     ...                                            write_lock(&list_lock);
-    atomic_dec(&el->rc, relfunc)           ...
+    if(atomic_dec_and_test(&el->rc))       ...
+       kfree(el);
     ...                                            remove_element
 }                                          write_unlock(&list_lock);
                                            ...
@@ -44,6 +46,7 @@ search_and_reference() could potentially hold reference to an element which
 has already been deleted from the list/array.  Use atomic_inc_not_zero()
 in this scenario as follows:
 
+CODE LISTING B:
 1.                                     2.
 add()                                  search_and_reference()
 {                                      {
@@ -79,6 +82,7 @@ search_and_reference() code path.  In such cases, the
 atomic_dec_and_test() may be moved from delete() to el_free()
 as follows:
 
+CODE LISTING C:
 1.                                     2.
 add()                                  search_and_reference()
 {                                      {
@@ -114,6 +118,17 @@ element can therefore safely be freed.  This in turn guarantees that if
 any reader finds the element, that reader may safely acquire a reference
 without checking the value of the reference counter.
 
+A clear advantage of the RCU-based pattern in listing C over the one
+in listing B is that any call to search_and_reference() that locates
+a given object will succeed in obtaining a reference to that object,
+even given a concurrent invocation of delete() for that same object.
+Similarly, a clear advantage of both listings B and C over listing A is
+that a call to delete() is not delayed even if there are an arbitrarily
+large number of calls to search_and_reference() searching for the same
+object that delete() was invoked on.  Instead, all that is delayed is
+the eventual invocation of kfree(), which is usually not a problem on
+modern computer systems, even the small ones.
+
 In cases where delete() can sleep, synchronize_rcu() can be called from
 delete(), so that el_free() can be subsumed into delete as follows:
 
@@ -130,3 +145,7 @@ delete()
        kfree(el);
     ...
 }
+
+As additional examples in the kernel, the pattern in listing C is used by
+reference counting of struct pid, while the pattern in listing B is used by
+struct posix_acl.
index 1ab70c3..13e88fc 100644 (file)
@@ -153,7 +153,7 @@ rcupdate.rcu_task_stall_timeout
        This boot/sysfs parameter controls the RCU-tasks stall warning
        interval.  A value of zero or less suppresses RCU-tasks stall
        warnings.  A positive value sets the stall-warning interval
-       in jiffies.  An RCU-tasks stall warning starts with the line:
+       in seconds.  An RCU-tasks stall warning starts with the line:
 
                INFO: rcu_tasks detected stalls on tasks:
 
index 981651a..7e1a872 100644 (file)
@@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ synchronize_rcu()
 
 rcu_assign_pointer()
 
-       typeof(p) rcu_assign_pointer(p, typeof(p) v);
+       void rcu_assign_pointer(p, typeof(p) v);
 
        Yes, rcu_assign_pointer() -is- implemented as a macro, though it
        would be cool to be able to declare a function in this manner.
@@ -220,9 +220,9 @@ rcu_assign_pointer()
 
        The updater uses this function to assign a new value to an
        RCU-protected pointer, in order to safely communicate the change
-       in value from the updater to the reader.  This function returns
-       the new value, and also executes any memory-barrier instructions
-       required for a given CPU architecture.
+       in value from the updater to the reader.  This macro does not
+       evaluate to an rvalue, but it does execute any memory-barrier
+       instructions required for a given CPU architecture.
 
        Perhaps just as important, it serves to document (1) which
        pointers are protected by RCU and (2) the point at which a
index 138f666..e6e8062 100644 (file)
                        others).
 
        ccw_timeout_log [S390]
-                       See Documentation/s390/CommonIO for details.
+                       See Documentation/s390/common_io.rst for details.
 
        cgroup_disable= [KNL] Disable a particular controller
                        Format: {name of the controller(s) to disable}
                                /selinux/checkreqprot.
 
        cio_ignore=     [S390]
-                       See Documentation/s390/CommonIO for details.
+                       See Documentation/s390/common_io.rst for details.
        clk_ignore_unused
                        [CLK]
                        Prevents the clock framework from automatically gating
                        the propagation of recent CPU-hotplug changes up
                        the rcu_node combining tree.
 
+       rcutree.use_softirq=    [KNL]
+                       If set to zero, move all RCU_SOFTIRQ processing to
+                       per-CPU rcuc kthreads.  Defaults to a non-zero
+                       value, meaning that RCU_SOFTIRQ is used by default.
+                       Specify rcutree.use_softirq=0 to use rcuc kthreads.
+
        rcutree.rcu_fanout_exact= [KNL]
                        Disable autobalancing of the rcu_node combining
                        tree.  This is used by rcutorture, and might
                        targets for exploits that can control RIP.
 
                        emulate     [default] Vsyscalls turn into traps and are
-                                   emulated reasonably safely.
+                                   emulated reasonably safely.  The vsyscall
+                                   page is readable.
 
-                       native      Vsyscalls are native syscall instructions.
-                                   This is a little bit faster than trapping
-                                   and makes a few dynamic recompilers work
-                                   better than they would in emulation mode.
-                                   It also makes exploits much easier to write.
+                       xonly       Vsyscalls turn into traps and are
+                                   emulated reasonably safely.  The vsyscall
+                                   page is not readable.
 
                        none        Vsyscalls don't work at all.  This makes
                                    them quite hard to use for exploits but
index b73a251..5ae2ef2 100644 (file)
@@ -207,6 +207,10 @@ HWCAP_FLAGM
 
     Functionality implied by ID_AA64ISAR0_EL1.TS == 0b0001.
 
+HWCAP2_FLAGM2
+
+    Functionality implied by ID_AA64ISAR0_EL1.TS == 0b0010.
+
 HWCAP_SSBS
 
     Functionality implied by ID_AA64PFR1_EL1.SSBS == 0b0010.
@@ -223,6 +227,10 @@ HWCAP_PACG
     ID_AA64ISAR1_EL1.GPI == 0b0001, as described by
     Documentation/arm64/pointer-authentication.txt.
 
+HWCAP2_FRINT
+
+    Functionality implied by ID_AA64ISAR1_EL1.FRINTTS == 0b0001.
+
 
 4. Unused AT_HWCAP bits
 -----------------------
index dca3fb0..0ab747e 100644 (file)
@@ -81,9 +81,11 @@ Non-RMW ops:
 
 The non-RMW ops are (typically) regular LOADs and STOREs and are canonically
 implemented using READ_ONCE(), WRITE_ONCE(), smp_load_acquire() and
-smp_store_release() respectively.
+smp_store_release() respectively. Therefore, if you find yourself only using
+the Non-RMW operations of atomic_t, you do not in fact need atomic_t at all
+and are doing it wrong.
 
-The one detail to this is that atomic_set{}() should be observable to the RMW
+A subtle detail of atomic_set{}() is that it should be observable to the RMW
 ops. That is:
 
   C atomic-set
@@ -187,13 +189,22 @@ The barriers:
 
   smp_mb__{before,after}_atomic()
 
-only apply to the RMW ops and can be used to augment/upgrade the ordering
-inherent to the used atomic op. These barriers provide a full smp_mb().
+only apply to the RMW atomic ops and can be used to augment/upgrade the
+ordering inherent to the op. These barriers act almost like a full smp_mb():
+smp_mb__before_atomic() orders all earlier accesses against the RMW op
+itself and all accesses following it, and smp_mb__after_atomic() orders all
+later accesses against the RMW op and all accesses preceding it. However,
+accesses between the smp_mb__{before,after}_atomic() and the RMW op are not
+ordered, so it is advisable to place the barrier right next to the RMW atomic
+op whenever possible.
 
 These helper barriers exist because architectures have varying implicit
 ordering on their SMP atomic primitives. For example our TSO architectures
 provide full ordered atomics and these barriers are no-ops.
 
+NOTE: when the atomic RmW ops are fully ordered, they should also imply a
+compiler barrier.
+
 Thus:
 
   atomic_fetch_add();
@@ -212,7 +223,9 @@ Further, while something like:
   atomic_dec(&X);
 
 is a 'typical' RELEASE pattern, the barrier is strictly stronger than
-a RELEASE. Similarly for something like:
+a RELEASE because it orders preceding instructions against both the read
+and write parts of the atomic_dec(), and against all following instructions
+as well. Similarly, something like:
 
   atomic_inc(&X);
   smp_mb__after_atomic();
@@ -244,7 +257,8 @@ strictly stronger than ACQUIRE. As illustrated:
 
 This should not happen; but a hypothetical atomic_inc_acquire() --
 (void)atomic_fetch_inc_acquire() for instance -- would allow the outcome,
-since then:
+because it would not order the W part of the RMW against the following
+WRITE_ONCE.  Thus:
 
   P1                   P2
 
index 53e51ca..50966f6 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ Circular Buffers
 ================
 
 :Author: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
-:Author: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
+:Author: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.ibm.com>
 
 
 Linux provides a number of features that can be used to implement circular
index 93cbeb9..20ee447 100644 (file)
@@ -65,7 +65,7 @@ different format depending on what is required by the user:
 .. c:function:: u64 ktime_get_ns( void )
                u64 ktime_get_boottime_ns( void )
                u64 ktime_get_real_ns( void )
-               u64 ktime_get_tai_ns( void )
+               u64 ktime_get_clocktai_ns( void )
                u64 ktime_get_raw_ns( void )
 
        Same as the plain ktime_get functions, but returning a u64 number
@@ -99,16 +99,20 @@ Coarse and fast_ns access
 
 Some additional variants exist for more specialized cases:
 
-.. c:function:: ktime_t ktime_get_coarse_boottime( void )
+.. c:function:: ktime_t ktime_get_coarse( void )
+               ktime_t ktime_get_coarse_boottime( void )
                ktime_t ktime_get_coarse_real( void )
                ktime_t ktime_get_coarse_clocktai( void )
-               ktime_t ktime_get_coarse_raw( void )
+
+.. c:function:: u64 ktime_get_coarse_ns( void )
+               u64 ktime_get_coarse_boottime_ns( void )
+               u64 ktime_get_coarse_real_ns( void )
+               u64 ktime_get_coarse_clocktai_ns( void )
 
 .. c:function:: void ktime_get_coarse_ts64( struct timespec64 * )
                void ktime_get_coarse_boottime_ts64( struct timespec64 * )
                void ktime_get_coarse_real_ts64( struct timespec64 * )
                void ktime_get_coarse_clocktai_ts64( struct timespec64 * )
-               void ktime_get_coarse_raw_ts64( struct timespec64 * )
 
        These are quicker than the non-coarse versions, but less accurate,
        corresponding to CLOCK_MONONOTNIC_COARSE and CLOCK_REALTIME_COARSE
index cb61277..b90dafc 100644 (file)
@@ -12,6 +12,12 @@ physical_package_id:
        socket number, but the actual value is architecture and platform
        dependent.
 
+die_id:
+
+       the CPU die ID of cpuX. Typically it is the hardware platform's
+       identifier (rather than the kernel's).  The actual value is
+       architecture and platform dependent.
+
 core_id:
 
        the CPU core ID of cpuX. Typically it is the hardware platform's
@@ -30,25 +36,33 @@ drawer_id:
        identifier (rather than the kernel's).  The actual value is
        architecture and platform dependent.
 
-thread_siblings:
+core_cpus:
 
-       internal kernel map of cpuX's hardware threads within the same
-       core as cpuX.
+       internal kernel map of CPUs within the same core.
+       (deprecated name: "thread_siblings")
 
-thread_siblings_list:
+core_cpus_list:
 
-       human-readable list of cpuX's hardware threads within the same
-       core as cpuX.
+       human-readable list of CPUs within the same core.
+       (deprecated name: "thread_siblings_list");
 
-core_siblings:
+package_cpus:
 
-       internal kernel map of cpuX's hardware threads within the same
-       physical_package_id.
+       internal kernel map of the CPUs sharing the same physical_package_id.
+       (deprecated name: "core_siblings")
 
-core_siblings_list:
+package_cpus_list:
 
-       human-readable list of cpuX's hardware threads within the same
-       physical_package_id.
+       human-readable list of CPUs sharing the same physical_package_id.
+       (deprecated name: "core_siblings_list")
+
+die_cpus:
+
+       internal kernel map of CPUs within the same die.
+
+die_cpus_list:
+
+       human-readable list of CPUs within the same die.
 
 book_siblings:
 
@@ -81,11 +95,13 @@ For an architecture to support this feature, it must define some of
 these macros in include/asm-XXX/topology.h::
 
        #define topology_physical_package_id(cpu)
+       #define topology_die_id(cpu)
        #define topology_core_id(cpu)
        #define topology_book_id(cpu)
        #define topology_drawer_id(cpu)
        #define topology_sibling_cpumask(cpu)
        #define topology_core_cpumask(cpu)
+       #define topology_die_cpumask(cpu)
        #define topology_book_cpumask(cpu)
        #define topology_drawer_cpumask(cpu)
 
@@ -99,9 +115,11 @@ provides default definitions for any of the above macros that are
 not defined by include/asm-XXX/topology.h:
 
 1) topology_physical_package_id: -1
-2) topology_core_id: 0
-3) topology_sibling_cpumask: just the given CPU
-4) topology_core_cpumask: just the given CPU
+2) topology_die_id: -1
+3) topology_core_id: 0
+4) topology_sibling_cpumask: just the given CPU
+5) topology_core_cpumask: just the given CPU
+6) topology_die_cpumask: just the given CPU
 
 For architectures that don't support books (CONFIG_SCHED_BOOK) there are no
 default definitions for topology_book_id() and topology_book_cpumask().
diff --git a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/interrupt-controller/amazon,al-fic.txt b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/interrupt-controller/amazon,al-fic.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..4e82fd5
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,29 @@
+Amazon's Annapurna Labs Fabric Interrupt Controller
+
+Required properties:
+
+- compatible: should be "amazon,al-fic"
+- reg: physical base address and size of the registers
+- interrupt-controller: identifies the node as an interrupt controller
+- #interrupt-cells: must be 2.
+  First cell defines the index of the interrupt within the controller.
+  Second cell is used to specify the trigger type and must be one of the
+  following:
+    - bits[3:0] trigger type and level flags
+       1 = low-to-high edge triggered
+       4 = active high level-sensitive
+- interrupt-parent: specifies the parent interrupt controller.
+- interrupts: describes which input line in the interrupt parent, this
+  fic's output is connected to. This field property depends on the parent's
+  binding
+
+Example:
+
+amazon_fic: interrupt-controller@0xfd8a8500 {
+       compatible = "amazon,al-fic";
+       interrupt-controller;
+       #interrupt-cells = <2>;
+       reg = <0x0 0xfd8a8500 0x0 0x1000>;
+       interrupt-parent = <&gic>;
+       interrupts = <GIC_SPI 0x0 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>;
+};
index 1502a51..7d531d5 100644 (file)
@@ -15,6 +15,7 @@ Required properties:
     "amlogic,meson-gxbb-gpio-intc" for GXBB SoCs (S905) or
     "amlogic,meson-gxl-gpio-intc" for GXL SoCs (S905X, S912)
     "amlogic,meson-axg-gpio-intc" for AXG SoCs (A113D, A113X)
+    "amlogic,meson-g12a-gpio-intc" for G12A SoCs (S905D2, S905X2, S905Y2)
 - reg : Specifies base physical address and size of the registers.
 - interrupt-controller : Identifies the node as an interrupt controller.
 - #interrupt-cells : Specifies the number of cells needed to encode an
index ab921f1..e134053 100644 (file)
@@ -6,11 +6,16 @@ C-SKY Multi-processors Interrupt Controller is designed for ck807/ck810/ck860
 SMP soc, and it also could be used in non-SMP system.
 
 Interrupt number definition:
-
   0-15  : software irq, and we use 15 as our IPI_IRQ.
  16-31  : private  irq, and we use 16 as the co-processor timer.
  31-1024: common irq for soc ip.
 
+Interrupt triger mode: (Defined in dt-bindings/interrupt-controller/irq.h)
+ IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH (default)
+ IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_LOW
+ IRQ_TYPE_EDGE_RISING
+ IRQ_TYPE_EDGE_FALLING
+
 =============================
 intc node bindings definition
 =============================
@@ -26,15 +31,22 @@ intc node bindings definition
        - #interrupt-cells
                Usage: required
                Value type: <u32>
-               Definition: must be <1>
+               Definition: <2>
        - interrupt-controller:
                Usage: required
 
-Examples:
+Examples: ("interrupts = <irq_num IRQ_TYPE_XXX>")
 ---------
+#include <dt-bindings/interrupt-controller/irq.h>
 
        intc: interrupt-controller {
                compatible = "csky,mpintc";
-               #interrupt-cells = <1>;
+               #interrupt-cells = <2>;
                interrupt-controller;
        };
+
+       device: device-example {
+               ...
+               interrupts = <34 IRQ_TYPE_EDGE_RISING>;
+               interrupt-parent = <&intc>;
+       };
diff --git a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/interrupt-controller/renesas,rza1-irqc.txt b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/interrupt-controller/renesas,rza1-irqc.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..727b7e4
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,43 @@
+DT bindings for the Renesas RZ/A1 Interrupt Controller
+
+The RZ/A1 Interrupt Controller is a front-end for the GIC found on Renesas
+RZ/A1 and RZ/A2 SoCs:
+  - IRQ sense select for 8 external interrupts, 1:1-mapped to 8 GIC SPI
+    interrupts,
+  - NMI edge select.
+
+Required properties:
+  - compatible: Must be "renesas,<soctype>-irqc", and "renesas,rza1-irqc" as
+               fallback.
+               Examples with soctypes are:
+                 - "renesas,r7s72100-irqc" (RZ/A1H)
+                 - "renesas,r7s9210-irqc" (RZ/A2M)
+  - #interrupt-cells: Must be 2 (an interrupt index and flags, as defined
+                                in interrupts.txt in this directory)
+  - #address-cells: Must be zero
+  - interrupt-controller: Marks the device as an interrupt controller
+  - reg: Base address and length of the memory resource used by the interrupt
+         controller
+  - interrupt-map: Specifies the mapping from external interrupts to GIC
+                  interrupts
+  - interrupt-map-mask: Must be <7 0>
+
+Example:
+
+       irqc: interrupt-controller@fcfef800 {
+               compatible = "renesas,r7s72100-irqc", "renesas,rza1-irqc";
+               #interrupt-cells = <2>;
+               #address-cells = <0>;
+               interrupt-controller;
+               reg = <0xfcfef800 0x6>;
+               interrupt-map =
+                       <0 0 &gic GIC_SPI 0 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>,
+                       <1 0 &gic GIC_SPI 1 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>,
+                       <2 0 &gic GIC_SPI 2 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>,
+                       <3 0 &gic GIC_SPI 3 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>,
+                       <4 0 &gic GIC_SPI 4 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>,
+                       <5 0 &gic GIC_SPI 5 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>,
+                       <6 0 &gic GIC_SPI 6 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>,
+                       <7 0 &gic GIC_SPI 7 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>;
+               interrupt-map-mask = <7 0>;
+       };
diff --git a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/perf/fsl-imx-ddr.txt b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/perf/fsl-imx-ddr.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..d77e3f2
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,21 @@
+* Freescale(NXP) IMX8 DDR performance monitor
+
+Required properties:
+
+- compatible: should be one of:
+       "fsl,imx8-ddr-pmu"
+       "fsl,imx8m-ddr-pmu"
+
+- reg: physical address and size
+
+- interrupts: single interrupt
+       generated by the control block
+
+Example:
+
+       ddr-pmu@5c020000 {
+               compatible = "fsl,imx8-ddr-pmu";
+               reg = <0x5c020000 0x10000>;
+               interrupt-parent = <&gic>;
+               interrupts = <GIC_SPI 131 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>;
+       };
index 27f02ec..f97a4ec 100644 (file)
@@ -152,17 +152,19 @@ examples:
   - |
     // Example 2: Spike ISA Simulator with 1 Hart
     cpus {
-            cpu@0 {
-                    device_type = "cpu";
-                    reg = <0>;
-                    compatible = "riscv";
-                    riscv,isa = "rv64imafdc";
-                    mmu-type = "riscv,sv48";
-                    interrupt-controller {
-                            #interrupt-cells = <1>;
-                            interrupt-controller;
-                            compatible = "riscv,cpu-intc";
-                    };
-            };
+        #address-cells = <1>;
+        #size-cells = <0>;
+        cpu@0 {
+                device_type = "cpu";
+                reg = <0>;
+                compatible = "riscv";
+                riscv,isa = "rv64imafdc";
+                mmu-type = "riscv,sv48";
+                interrupt-controller {
+                        #interrupt-cells = <1>;
+                        interrupt-controller;
+                        compatible = "riscv,cpu-intc";
+                };
+        };
     };
 ...
diff --git a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/timer/nxp,sysctr-timer.txt b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/timer/nxp,sysctr-timer.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..d576599
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+NXP System Counter Module(sys_ctr)
+
+The system counter(sys_ctr) is a programmable system counter which provides
+a shared time base to Cortex A15, A7, A53, A73, etc. it is intended for use in
+applications where the counter is always powered and support multiple,
+unrelated clocks. The compare frame inside can be used for timer purpose.
+
+Required properties:
+
+- compatible :      should be "nxp,sysctr-timer"
+- reg :             Specifies the base physical address and size of the comapre
+                    frame and the counter control, read & compare.
+- interrupts :      should be the first compare frames' interrupt
+- clocks :         Specifies the counter clock.
+- clock-names:             Specifies the clock's name of this module
+
+Example:
+
+       system_counter: timer@306a0000 {
+               compatible = "nxp,sysctr-timer";
+               reg = <0x306a0000 0x20000>;/* system-counter-rd & compare */
+               clocks = <&clk_8m>;
+               clock-names = "per";
+               interrupts = <GIC_SPI 47 IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>;
+       };
index 30e6aa7..5158577 100644 (file)
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@ not strictly considered I/O devices. They are considered here as well,
 although they are not the focus of this document.
 
 Some additional information can also be found in the kernel source under
-Documentation/s390/driver-model.txt.
+Documentation/s390/driver-model.rst.
 
 The css bus
 ===========
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ into several categories:
 * Standard I/O subchannels, for use by the system. They have a child
   device on the ccw bus and are described below.
 * I/O subchannels bound to the vfio-ccw driver. See
-  Documentation/s390/vfio-ccw.txt.
+  Documentation/s390/vfio-ccw.rst.
 * Message subchannels. No Linux driver currently exists.
 * CHSC subchannels (at most one). The chsc subchannel driver can be used
   to send asynchronous chsc commands.
index 66cad5c..a226061 100644 (file)
@@ -45,6 +45,7 @@ Table of Contents
   3.9   /proc/<pid>/map_files - Information about memory mapped files
   3.10  /proc/<pid>/timerslack_ns - Task timerslack value
   3.11 /proc/<pid>/patch_state - Livepatch patch operation state
+  3.12 /proc/<pid>/arch_status - Task architecture specific information
 
   4    Configuring procfs
   4.1  Mount options
@@ -1948,6 +1949,45 @@ patched.  If the patch is being enabled, then the task has already been
 patched.  If the patch is being disabled, then the task hasn't been
 unpatched yet.
 
+3.12 /proc/<pid>/arch_status - task architecture specific status
+-------------------------------------------------------------------
+When CONFIG_PROC_PID_ARCH_STATUS is enabled, this file displays the
+architecture specific status of the task.
+
+Example
+-------
+ $ cat /proc/6753/arch_status
+ AVX512_elapsed_ms:      8
+
+Description
+-----------
+
+x86 specific entries:
+---------------------
+ AVX512_elapsed_ms:
+ ------------------
+  If AVX512 is supported on the machine, this entry shows the milliseconds
+  elapsed since the last time AVX512 usage was recorded. The recording
+  happens on a best effort basis when a task is scheduled out. This means
+  that the value depends on two factors:
+
+    1) The time which the task spent on the CPU without being scheduled
+       out. With CPU isolation and a single runnable task this can take
+       several seconds.
+
+    2) The time since the task was scheduled out last. Depending on the
+       reason for being scheduled out (time slice exhausted, syscall ...)
+       this can be arbitrary long time.
+
+  As a consequence the value cannot be considered precise and authoritative
+  information. The application which uses this information has to be aware
+  of the overall scenario on the system in order to determine whether a
+  task is a real AVX512 user or not. Precise information can be obtained
+  with performance counters.
+
+  A special value of '-1' indicates that no AVX512 usage was recorded, thus
+  the task is unlikely an AVX512 user, but depends on the workload and the
+  scheduling scenario, it also could be a false negative mentioned above.
 
 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Configuring procfs
index 39fae14..f189d13 100644 (file)
@@ -15,34 +15,48 @@ tens of thousands of) instantiations. For example a lock in the inode
 struct is one class, while each inode has its own instantiation of that
 lock class.
 
-The validator tracks the 'state' of lock-classes, and it tracks
-dependencies between different lock-classes. The validator maintains a
-rolling proof that the state and the dependencies are correct.
-
-Unlike an lock instantiation, the lock-class itself never goes away: when
-a lock-class is used for the first time after bootup it gets registered,
-and all subsequent uses of that lock-class will be attached to this
-lock-class.
+The validator tracks the 'usage state' of lock-classes, and it tracks
+the dependencies between different lock-classes. Lock usage indicates
+how a lock is used with regard to its IRQ contexts, while lock
+dependency can be understood as lock order, where L1 -> L2 suggests that
+a task is attempting to acquire L2 while holding L1. From lockdep's
+perspective, the two locks (L1 and L2) are not necessarily related; that
+dependency just means the order ever happened. The validator maintains a
+continuing effort to prove lock usages and dependencies are correct or
+the validator will shoot a splat if incorrect.
+
+A lock-class's behavior is constructed by its instances collectively:
+when the first instance of a lock-class is used after bootup the class
+gets registered, then all (subsequent) instances will be mapped to the
+class and hence their usages and dependecies will contribute to those of
+the class. A lock-class does not go away when a lock instance does, but
+it can be removed if the memory space of the lock class (static or
+dynamic) is reclaimed, this happens for example when a module is
+unloaded or a workqueue is destroyed.
 
 State
 -----
 
-The validator tracks lock-class usage history into 4 * nSTATEs + 1 separate
-state bits:
+The validator tracks lock-class usage history and divides the usage into
+(4 usages * n STATEs + 1) categories:
 
+where the 4 usages can be:
 - 'ever held in STATE context'
 - 'ever held as readlock in STATE context'
 - 'ever held with STATE enabled'
 - 'ever held as readlock with STATE enabled'
 
-Where STATE can be either one of (kernel/locking/lockdep_states.h)
- - hardirq
- - softirq
+where the n STATEs are coded in kernel/locking/lockdep_states.h and as of
+now they include:
+- hardirq
+- softirq
 
+where the last 1 category is:
 - 'ever used'                                       [ == !unused        ]
 
-When locking rules are violated, these state bits are presented in the
-locking error messages, inside curlies. A contrived example:
+When locking rules are violated, these usage bits are presented in the
+locking error messages, inside curlies, with a total of 2 * n STATEs bits.
+A contrived example:
 
    modprobe/2287 is trying to acquire lock:
     (&sio_locks[i].lock){-.-.}, at: [<c02867fd>] mutex_lock+0x21/0x24
@@ -51,28 +65,67 @@ locking error messages, inside curlies. A contrived example:
     (&sio_locks[i].lock){-.-.}, at: [<c02867fd>] mutex_lock+0x21/0x24
 
 
-The bit position indicates STATE, STATE-read, for each of the states listed
-above, and the character displayed in each indicates:
+For a given lock, the bit positions from left to right indicate the usage
+of the lock and readlock (if exists), for each of the n STATEs listed
+above respectively, and the character displayed at each bit position
+indicates:
 
    '.'  acquired while irqs disabled and not in irq context
    '-'  acquired in irq context
    '+'  acquired with irqs enabled
    '?'  acquired in irq context with irqs enabled.
 
-Unused mutexes cannot be part of the cause of an error.
+The bits are illustrated with an example:
+
+    (&sio_locks[i].lock){-.-.}, at: [<c02867fd>] mutex_lock+0x21/0x24
+                         ||||
+                         ||| \-> softirq disabled and not in softirq context
+                         || \--> acquired in softirq context
+                         | \---> hardirq disabled and not in hardirq context
+                          \----> acquired in hardirq context
+
+
+For a given STATE, whether the lock is ever acquired in that STATE
+context and whether that STATE is enabled yields four possible cases as
+shown in the table below. The bit character is able to indicate which
+exact case is for the lock as of the reporting time.
+
+   -------------------------------------------
+  |              | irq enabled | irq disabled |
+  |-------------------------------------------|
+  | ever in irq  |      ?      |       -      |
+  |-------------------------------------------|
+  | never in irq |      +      |       .      |
+   -------------------------------------------
+
+The character '-' suggests irq is disabled because if otherwise the
+charactor '?' would have been shown instead. Similar deduction can be
+applied for '+' too.
+
+Unused locks (e.g., mutexes) cannot be part of the cause of an error.
 
 
 Single-lock state rules:
 ------------------------
 
+A lock is irq-safe means it was ever used in an irq context, while a lock
+is irq-unsafe means it was ever acquired with irq enabled.
+
 A softirq-unsafe lock-class is automatically hardirq-unsafe as well. The
-following states are exclusive, and only one of them is allowed to be
-set for any lock-class:
+following states must be exclusive: only one of them is allowed to be set
+for any lock-class based on its usage:
+
+ <hardirq-safe> or <hardirq-unsafe>
+ <softirq-safe> or <softirq-unsafe>
 
- <hardirq-safe> and <hardirq-unsafe>
- <softirq-safe> and <softirq-unsafe>
+This is because if a lock can be used in irq context (irq-safe) then it
+cannot be ever acquired with irq enabled (irq-unsafe). Otherwise, a
+deadlock may happen. For example, in the scenario that after this lock
+was acquired but before released, if the context is interrupted this
+lock will be attempted to acquire twice, which creates a deadlock,
+referred to as lock recursion deadlock.
 
-The validator detects and reports lock usage that violate these
+The validator detects and reports lock usage that violates these
 single-lock state rules.
 
 Multi-lock dependency rules:
@@ -81,15 +134,18 @@ Multi-lock dependency rules:
 The same lock-class must not be acquired twice, because this could lead
 to lock recursion deadlocks.
 
-Furthermore, two locks may not be taken in different order:
+Furthermore, two locks can not be taken in inverse order:
 
  <L1> -> <L2>
  <L2> -> <L1>
 
-because this could lead to lock inversion deadlocks. (The validator
-finds such dependencies in arbitrary complexity, i.e. there can be any
-other locking sequence between the acquire-lock operations, the
-validator will still track all dependencies between locks.)
+because this could lead to a deadlock - referred to as lock inversion
+deadlock - as attempts to acquire the two locks form a circle which
+could lead to the two contexts waiting for each other permanently. The
+validator will find such dependency circle in arbitrary complexity,
+i.e., there can be any other locking sequence between the acquire-lock
+operations; the validator will still find whether these locks can be
+acquired in a circular fashion.
 
 Furthermore, the following usage based lock dependencies are not allowed
 between any two lock-classes:
index f70ebcd..e4e07c8 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
                         ============================
 
 By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
-    Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
+    Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.ibm.com>
     Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
     Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
 
index 18735dc..0a18075 100644 (file)
@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@ you probably needn't concern yourself with isdn4k-utils.
 ====================== ===============  ========================================
 GNU C                  4.6              gcc --version
 GNU make               3.81             make --version
-binutils               2.20             ld -v
+binutils               2.21             ld -v
 flex                   2.5.35           flex --version
 bison                  2.0              bison --version
 util-linux             2.10o            fdformat --version
@@ -77,9 +77,7 @@ You will need GNU make 3.81 or later to build the kernel.
 Binutils
 --------
 
-The build system has, as of 4.13, switched to using thin archives (`ar T`)
-rather than incremental linking (`ld -r`) for built-in.a intermediate steps.
-This requires binutils 2.20 or newer.
+Binutils 2.21 or newer is needed to build the kernel.
 
 pkg-config
 ----------
diff --git a/Documentation/s390/3270.rst b/Documentation/s390/3270.rst
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..e09e779
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,298 @@
+===============================
+IBM 3270 Display System support
+===============================
+
+This file describes the driver that supports local channel attachment
+of IBM 3270 devices.  It consists of three sections:
+
+       * Introduction
+       * Installation
+       * Operation
+
+
+Introduction
+============
+
+This paper describes installing and operating 3270 devices under
+Linux/390.  A 3270 device is a block-mode rows-and-columns terminal of
+which I'm sure hundreds of millions were sold by IBM and clonemakers
+twenty and thirty years ago.
+
+You may have 3270s in-house and not know it.  If you're using the
+VM-ESA operating system, define a 3270 to your virtual machine by using
+the command "DEF GRAF <hex-address>"  This paper presumes you will be
+defining four 3270s with the CP/CMS commands:
+
+       - DEF GRAF 620
+       - DEF GRAF 621
+       - DEF GRAF 622
+       - DEF GRAF 623
+
+Your network connection from VM-ESA allows you to use x3270, tn3270, or
+another 3270 emulator, started from an xterm window on your PC or
+workstation.  With the DEF GRAF command, an application such as xterm,
+and this Linux-390 3270 driver, you have another way of talking to your
+Linux box.
+
+This paper covers installation of the driver and operation of a
+dialed-in x3270.
+
+
+Installation
+============
+
+You install the driver by installing a patch, doing a kernel build, and
+running the configuration script (config3270.sh, in this directory).
+
+WARNING:  If you are using 3270 console support, you must rerun the
+configuration script every time you change the console's address (perhaps
+by using the condev= parameter in silo's /boot/parmfile).  More precisely,
+you should rerun the configuration script every time your set of 3270s,
+including the console 3270, changes subchannel identifier relative to
+one another.  ReIPL as soon as possible after running the configuration
+script and the resulting /tmp/mkdev3270.
+
+If you have chosen to make tub3270 a module, you add a line to a
+configuration file under /etc/modprobe.d/.  If you are working on a VM
+virtual machine, you can use DEF GRAF to define virtual 3270 devices.
+
+You may generate both 3270 and 3215 console support, or one or the
+other, or neither.  If you generate both, the console type under VM is
+not changed.  Use #CP Q TERM to see what the current console type is.
+Use #CP TERM CONMODE 3270 to change it to 3270.  If you generate only
+3270 console support, then the driver automatically converts your console
+at boot time to a 3270 if it is a 3215.
+
+In brief, these are the steps:
+
+       1. Install the tub3270 patch
+       2. (If a module) add a line to a file in `/etc/modprobe.d/*.conf`
+       3. (If VM) define devices with DEF GRAF
+       4. Reboot
+       5. Configure
+
+To test that everything works, assuming VM and x3270,
+
+       1. Bring up an x3270 window.
+       2. Use the DIAL command in that window.
+       3. You should immediately see a Linux login screen.
+
+Here are the installation steps in detail:
+
+       1.  The 3270 driver is a part of the official Linux kernel
+       source.  Build a tree with the kernel source and any necessary
+       patches.  Then do::
+
+               make oldconfig
+               (If you wish to disable 3215 console support, edit
+               .config; change CONFIG_TN3215's value to "n";
+               and rerun "make oldconfig".)
+               make image
+               make modules
+               make modules_install
+
+       2. (Perform this step only if you have configured tub3270 as a
+       module.)  Add a line to a file `/etc/modprobe.d/*.conf` to automatically
+       load the driver when it's needed.  With this line added, you will see
+       login prompts appear on your 3270s as soon as boot is complete (or
+       with emulated 3270s, as soon as you dial into your vm guest using the
+       command "DIAL <vmguestname>").  Since the line-mode major number is
+       227, the line to add should be::
+
+               alias char-major-227 tub3270
+
+       3. Define graphic devices to your vm guest machine, if you
+       haven't already.  Define them before you reboot (reipl):
+
+               - DEFINE GRAF 620
+               - DEFINE GRAF 621
+               - DEFINE GRAF 622
+               - DEFINE GRAF 623
+
+       4. Reboot.  The reboot process scans hardware devices, including
+       3270s, and this enables the tub3270 driver once loaded to respond
+       correctly to the configuration requests of the next step.  If
+       you have chosen 3270 console support, your console now behaves
+       as a 3270, not a 3215.
+
+       5. Run the 3270 configuration script config3270.  It is
+       distributed in this same directory, Documentation/s390, as
+       config3270.sh.  Inspect the output script it produces,
+       /tmp/mkdev3270, and then run that script.  This will create the
+       necessary character special device files and make the necessary
+       changes to /etc/inittab.
+
+       Then notify /sbin/init that /etc/inittab has changed, by issuing
+       the telinit command with the q operand::
+
+               cd Documentation/s390
+               sh config3270.sh
+               sh /tmp/mkdev3270
+               telinit q
+
+       This should be sufficient for your first time.  If your 3270
+       configuration has changed and you're reusing config3270, you
+       should follow these steps::
+
+               Change 3270 configuration
+               Reboot
+               Run config3270 and /tmp/mkdev3270
+               Reboot
+
+Here are the testing steps in detail:
+
+       1. Bring up an x3270 window, or use an actual hardware 3278 or
+       3279, or use the 3270 emulator of your choice.  You would be
+       running the emulator on your PC or workstation.  You would use
+       the command, for example::
+
+               x3270 vm-esa-domain-name &
+
+       if you wanted a 3278 Model 4 with 43 rows of 80 columns, the
+       default model number.  The driver does not take advantage of
+       extended attributes.
+
+       The screen you should now see contains a VM logo with input
+       lines near the bottom.  Use TAB to move to the bottom line,
+       probably labeled "COMMAND  ===>".
+
+       2. Use the DIAL command instead of the LOGIN command to connect
+       to one of the virtual 3270s you defined with the DEF GRAF
+       commands::
+
+               dial my-vm-guest-name
+
+       3. You should immediately see a login prompt from your
+       Linux-390 operating system.  If that does not happen, you would
+       see instead the line "DIALED TO my-vm-guest-name   0620".
+
+       To troubleshoot:  do these things.
+
+       A. Is the driver loaded?  Use the lsmod command (no operands)
+       to find out.  Probably it isn't.  Try loading it manually, with
+       the command "insmod tub3270".  Does that command give error
+       messages?  Ha!  There's your problem.
+
+       B. Is the /etc/inittab file modified as in installation step 3
+       above?  Use the grep command to find out; for instance, issue
+       "grep 3270 /etc/inittab".  Nothing found?  There's your
+       problem!
+
+       C. Are the device special files created, as in installation
+       step 2 above?  Use the ls -l command to find out; for instance,
+       issue "ls -l /dev/3270/tty620".  The output should start with the
+       letter "c" meaning character device and should contain "227, 1"
+       just to the left of the device name.  No such file?  no "c"?
+       Wrong major number?  Wrong minor number?  There's your
+       problem!
+
+       D. Do you get the message::
+
+                "HCPDIA047E my-vm-guest-name 0620 does not exist"?
+
+       If so, you must issue the command "DEF GRAF 620" from your VM
+       3215 console and then reboot the system.
+
+
+
+OPERATION.
+==========
+
+The driver defines three areas on the 3270 screen:  the log area, the
+input area, and the status area.
+
+The log area takes up all but the bottom two lines of the screen.  The
+driver writes terminal output to it, starting at the top line and going
+down.  When it fills, the status area changes from "Linux Running" to
+"Linux More...".  After a scrolling timeout of (default) 5 sec, the
+screen clears and more output is written, from the top down.
+
+The input area extends from the beginning of the second-to-last screen
+line to the start of the status area.  You type commands in this area
+and hit ENTER to execute them.
+
+The status area initializes to "Linux Running" to give you a warm
+fuzzy feeling.  When the log area fills up and output awaits, it
+changes to "Linux More...".  At this time you can do several things or
+nothing.  If you do nothing, the screen will clear in (default) 5 sec
+and more output will appear.  You may hit ENTER with nothing typed in
+the input area to toggle between "Linux More..." and "Linux Holding",
+which indicates no scrolling will occur.  (If you hit ENTER with "Linux
+Running" and nothing typed, the application receives a newline.)
+
+You may change the scrolling timeout value.  For example, the following
+command line::
+
+       echo scrolltime=60 > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
+
+changes the scrolling timeout value to 60 sec.  Set scrolltime to 0 if
+you wish to prevent scrolling entirely.
+
+Other things you may do when the log area fills up are:  hit PA2 to
+clear the log area and write more output to it, or hit CLEAR to clear
+the log area and the input area and write more output to the log area.
+
+Some of the Program Function (PF) and Program Attention (PA) keys are
+preassigned special functions.  The ones that are not yield an alarm
+when pressed.
+
+PA1 causes a SIGINT to the currently running application.  You may do
+the same thing from the input area, by typing "^C" and hitting ENTER.
+
+PA2 causes the log area to be cleared.  If output awaits, it is then
+written to the log area.
+
+PF3 causes an EOF to be received as input by the application.  You may
+cause an EOF also by typing "^D" and hitting ENTER.
+
+No PF key is preassigned to cause a job suspension, but you may cause a
+job suspension by typing "^Z" and hitting ENTER.  You may wish to
+assign this function to a PF key.  To make PF7 cause job suspension,
+execute the command::
+
+       echo pf7=^z > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
+
+If the input you type does not end with the two characters "^n", the
+driver appends a newline character and sends it to the tty driver;
+otherwise the driver strips the "^n" and does not append a newline.
+The IBM 3215 driver behaves similarly.
+
+Pf10 causes the most recent command to be retrieved from the tube's
+command stack (default depth 20) and displayed in the input area.  You
+may hit PF10 again for the next-most-recent command, and so on.  A
+command is entered into the stack only when the input area is not made
+invisible (such as for password entry) and it is not identical to the
+current top entry.  PF10 rotates backward through the command stack;
+PF11 rotates forward.  You may assign the backward function to any PF
+key (or PA key, for that matter), say, PA3, with the command::
+
+       echo -e pa3=\\033k > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
+
+This assigns the string ESC-k to PA3.  Similarly, the string ESC-j
+performs the forward function.  (Rationale:  In bash with vi-mode line
+editing, ESC-k and ESC-j retrieve backward and forward history.
+Suggestions welcome.)
+
+Is a stack size of twenty commands not to your liking?  Change it on
+the fly.  To change to saving the last 100 commands, execute the
+command::
+
+       echo recallsize=100 > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
+
+Have a command you issue frequently?  Assign it to a PF or PA key!  Use
+the command::
+
+       echo pf24="mkdir foobar; cd foobar" > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
+
+to execute the commands mkdir foobar and cd foobar immediately when you
+hit PF24.  Want to see the command line first, before you execute it?
+Use the -n option of the echo command::
+
+       echo -n pf24="mkdir foo; cd foo" > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
+
+
+
+Happy testing!  I welcome any and all comments about this document, the
+driver, etc etc.
+
+Dick Hitt <rbh00@utsglobal.com>
diff --git a/Documentation/s390/3270.txt b/Documentation/s390/3270.txt
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 7c715de..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,271 +0,0 @@
-IBM 3270 Display System support
-
-This file describes the driver that supports local channel attachment
-of IBM 3270 devices.  It consists of three sections:
-       * Introduction
-       * Installation
-       * Operation
-
-
-INTRODUCTION.
-
-This paper describes installing and operating 3270 devices under
-Linux/390.  A 3270 device is a block-mode rows-and-columns terminal of
-which I'm sure hundreds of millions were sold by IBM and clonemakers
-twenty and thirty years ago.
-
-You may have 3270s in-house and not know it.  If you're using the
-VM-ESA operating system, define a 3270 to your virtual machine by using
-the command "DEF GRAF <hex-address>"  This paper presumes you will be
-defining four 3270s with the CP/CMS commands
-
-       DEF GRAF 620
-       DEF GRAF 621
-       DEF GRAF 622
-       DEF GRAF 623
-
-Your network connection from VM-ESA allows you to use x3270, tn3270, or
-another 3270 emulator, started from an xterm window on your PC or
-workstation.  With the DEF GRAF command, an application such as xterm,
-and this Linux-390 3270 driver, you have another way of talking to your
-Linux box.
-
-This paper covers installation of the driver and operation of a
-dialed-in x3270.
-
-
-INSTALLATION.
-
-You install the driver by installing a patch, doing a kernel build, and
-running the configuration script (config3270.sh, in this directory).
-
-WARNING:  If you are using 3270 console support, you must rerun the
-configuration script every time you change the console's address (perhaps
-by using the condev= parameter in silo's /boot/parmfile).  More precisely,
-you should rerun the configuration script every time your set of 3270s,
-including the console 3270, changes subchannel identifier relative to
-one another.  ReIPL as soon as possible after running the configuration
-script and the resulting /tmp/mkdev3270.
-
-If you have chosen to make tub3270 a module, you add a line to a
-configuration file under /etc/modprobe.d/.  If you are working on a VM
-virtual machine, you can use DEF GRAF to define virtual 3270 devices.
-
-You may generate both 3270 and 3215 console support, or one or the
-other, or neither.  If you generate both, the console type under VM is
-not changed.  Use #CP Q TERM to see what the current console type is.
-Use #CP TERM CONMODE 3270 to change it to 3270.  If you generate only
-3270 console support, then the driver automatically converts your console
-at boot time to a 3270 if it is a 3215.
-
-In brief, these are the steps:
-       1. Install the tub3270 patch
-       2. (If a module) add a line to a file in /etc/modprobe.d/*.conf
-       3. (If VM) define devices with DEF GRAF
-       4. Reboot
-       5. Configure
-
-To test that everything works, assuming VM and x3270,
-       1. Bring up an x3270 window.
-       2. Use the DIAL command in that window.
-       3. You should immediately see a Linux login screen.
-
-Here are the installation steps in detail:
-
-       1.  The 3270 driver is a part of the official Linux kernel
-       source.  Build a tree with the kernel source and any necessary
-       patches.  Then do
-               make oldconfig
-               (If you wish to disable 3215 console support, edit
-               .config; change CONFIG_TN3215's value to "n";
-               and rerun "make oldconfig".)
-               make image
-               make modules
-               make modules_install
-
-       2. (Perform this step only if you have configured tub3270 as a
-       module.)  Add a line to a file /etc/modprobe.d/*.conf to automatically
-       load the driver when it's needed.  With this line added, you will see
-       login prompts appear on your 3270s as soon as boot is complete (or
-       with emulated 3270s, as soon as you dial into your vm guest using the
-       command "DIAL <vmguestname>").  Since the line-mode major number is
-       227, the line to add should be:
-               alias char-major-227 tub3270
-
-       3. Define graphic devices to your vm guest machine, if you
-       haven't already.  Define them before you reboot (reipl):
-               DEFINE GRAF 620
-               DEFINE GRAF 621
-               DEFINE GRAF 622
-               DEFINE GRAF 623
-
-       4. Reboot.  The reboot process scans hardware devices, including
-       3270s, and this enables the tub3270 driver once loaded to respond
-       correctly to the configuration requests of the next step.  If
-       you have chosen 3270 console support, your console now behaves
-       as a 3270, not a 3215.
-
-       5. Run the 3270 configuration script config3270.  It is
-       distributed in this same directory, Documentation/s390, as
-       config3270.sh.  Inspect the output script it produces,
-       /tmp/mkdev3270, and then run that script.  This will create the
-       necessary character special device files and make the necessary
-       changes to /etc/inittab.
-
-       Then notify /sbin/init that /etc/inittab has changed, by issuing
-       the telinit command with the q operand:
-               cd Documentation/s390
-               sh config3270.sh
-               sh /tmp/mkdev3270
-               telinit q
-
-       This should be sufficient for your first time.  If your 3270
-       configuration has changed and you're reusing config3270, you
-       should follow these steps:
-               Change 3270 configuration
-               Reboot
-               Run config3270 and /tmp/mkdev3270
-               Reboot
-
-Here are the testing steps in detail:
-
-       1. Bring up an x3270 window, or use an actual hardware 3278 or
-       3279, or use the 3270 emulator of your choice.  You would be
-       running the emulator on your PC or workstation.  You would use
-       the command, for example,
-               x3270 vm-esa-domain-name &
-       if you wanted a 3278 Model 4 with 43 rows of 80 columns, the
-       default model number.  The driver does not take advantage of
-       extended attributes.
-
-       The screen you should now see contains a VM logo with input
-       lines near the bottom.  Use TAB to move to the bottom line,
-       probably labeled "COMMAND  ===>".
-
-       2. Use the DIAL command instead of the LOGIN command to connect
-       to one of the virtual 3270s you defined with the DEF GRAF
-       commands:
-               dial my-vm-guest-name
-
-       3. You should immediately see a login prompt from your
-       Linux-390 operating system.  If that does not happen, you would
-       see instead the line "DIALED TO my-vm-guest-name   0620".
-
-       To troubleshoot:  do these things.
-
-       A. Is the driver loaded?  Use the lsmod command (no operands)
-       to find out.  Probably it isn't.  Try loading it manually, with
-       the command "insmod tub3270".  Does that command give error
-       messages?  Ha!  There's your problem.
-
-       B. Is the /etc/inittab file modified as in installation step 3
-       above?  Use the grep command to find out; for instance, issue
-       "grep 3270 /etc/inittab".  Nothing found?  There's your
-       problem!
-
-       C. Are the device special files created, as in installation
-       step 2 above?  Use the ls -l command to find out; for instance,
-       issue "ls -l /dev/3270/tty620".  The output should start with the
-       letter "c" meaning character device and should contain "227, 1"
-       just to the left of the device name.  No such file?  no "c"?
-       Wrong major number?  Wrong minor number?  There's your
-       problem!
-
-       D. Do you get the message
-                "HCPDIA047E my-vm-guest-name 0620 does not exist"?
-       If so, you must issue the command "DEF GRAF 620" from your VM
-       3215 console and then reboot the system.
-
-
-
-OPERATION.
-
-The driver defines three areas on the 3270 screen:  the log area, the
-input area, and the status area.
-
-The log area takes up all but the bottom two lines of the screen.  The
-driver writes terminal output to it, starting at the top line and going
-down.  When it fills, the status area changes from "Linux Running" to
-"Linux More...".  After a scrolling timeout of (default) 5 sec, the
-screen clears and more output is written, from the top down.
-
-The input area extends from the beginning of the second-to-last screen
-line to the start of the status area.  You type commands in this area
-and hit ENTER to execute them.
-
-The status area initializes to "Linux Running" to give you a warm
-fuzzy feeling.  When the log area fills up and output awaits, it
-changes to "Linux More...".  At this time you can do several things or
-nothing.  If you do nothing, the screen will clear in (default) 5 sec
-and more output will appear.  You may hit ENTER with nothing typed in
-the input area to toggle between "Linux More..." and "Linux Holding",
-which indicates no scrolling will occur.  (If you hit ENTER with "Linux
-Running" and nothing typed, the application receives a newline.)
-
-You may change the scrolling timeout value.  For example, the following
-command line:
-       echo scrolltime=60 > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
-changes the scrolling timeout value to 60 sec.  Set scrolltime to 0 if
-you wish to prevent scrolling entirely.
-
-Other things you may do when the log area fills up are:  hit PA2 to
-clear the log area and write more output to it, or hit CLEAR to clear
-the log area and the input area and write more output to the log area.
-
-Some of the Program Function (PF) and Program Attention (PA) keys are
-preassigned special functions.  The ones that are not yield an alarm
-when pressed.
-
-PA1 causes a SIGINT to the currently running application.  You may do
-the same thing from the input area, by typing "^C" and hitting ENTER.
-
-PA2 causes the log area to be cleared.  If output awaits, it is then
-written to the log area.
-
-PF3 causes an EOF to be received as input by the application.  You may
-cause an EOF also by typing "^D" and hitting ENTER.
-
-No PF key is preassigned to cause a job suspension, but you may cause a
-job suspension by typing "^Z" and hitting ENTER.  You may wish to
-assign this function to a PF key.  To make PF7 cause job suspension,
-execute the command:
-       echo pf7=^z > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
-
-If the input you type does not end with the two characters "^n", the
-driver appends a newline character and sends it to the tty driver;
-otherwise the driver strips the "^n" and does not append a newline.
-The IBM 3215 driver behaves similarly.
-
-Pf10 causes the most recent command to be retrieved from the tube's
-command stack (default depth 20) and displayed in the input area.  You
-may hit PF10 again for the next-most-recent command, and so on.  A
-command is entered into the stack only when the input area is not made
-invisible (such as for password entry) and it is not identical to the
-current top entry.  PF10 rotates backward through the command stack;
-PF11 rotates forward.  You may assign the backward function to any PF
-key (or PA key, for that matter), say, PA3, with the command:
-       echo -e pa3=\\033k > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
-This assigns the string ESC-k to PA3.  Similarly, the string ESC-j
-performs the forward function.  (Rationale:  In bash with vi-mode line
-editing, ESC-k and ESC-j retrieve backward and forward history.
-Suggestions welcome.)
-
-Is a stack size of twenty commands not to your liking?  Change it on
-the fly.  To change to saving the last 100 commands, execute the
-command:
-       echo recallsize=100 > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
-
-Have a command you issue frequently?  Assign it to a PF or PA key!  Use
-the command
-       echo pf24="mkdir foobar; cd foobar" > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270 
-to execute the commands mkdir foobar and cd foobar immediately when you
-hit PF24.  Want to see the command line first, before you execute it?
-Use the -n option of the echo command:
-       echo -n pf24="mkdir foo; cd foo" > /proc/tty/driver/tty3270
-
-
-
-Happy testing!  I welcome any and all comments about this document, the
-driver, etc etc.
-
-Dick Hitt <rbh00@utsglobal.com>
diff --git a/Documentation/s390/CommonIO b/Documentation/s390/CommonIO
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 6e0f63f..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,125 +0,0 @@
-S/390 common I/O-Layer - command line parameters, procfs and debugfs entries
-============================================================================
-
-Command line parameters
------------------------
-
-* ccw_timeout_log
-
-  Enable logging of debug information in case of ccw device timeouts.
-
-* cio_ignore = device[,device[,..]]
-
-       device := {all | [!]ipldev | [!]condev | [!]<devno> | [!]<devno>-<devno>}
-
-  The given devices will be ignored by the common I/O-layer; no detection
-  and device sensing will be done on any of those devices. The subchannel to 
-  which the device in question is attached will be treated as if no device was
-  attached.
-
-  An ignored device can be un-ignored later; see the "/proc entries"-section for
-  details.
-
-  The devices must be given either as bus ids (0.x.abcd) or as hexadecimal
-  device numbers (0xabcd or abcd, for 2.4 backward compatibility). If you
-  give a device number 0xabcd, it will be interpreted as 0.0.abcd.
-
-  You can use the 'all' keyword to ignore all devices. The 'ipldev' and 'condev'
-  keywords can be used to refer to the CCW based boot device and CCW console
-  device respectively (these are probably useful only when combined with the '!'
-  operator). The '!' operator will cause the I/O-layer to _not_ ignore a device.
-  The command line is parsed from left to right.
-
-  For example, 
-       cio_ignore=0.0.0023-0.0.0042,0.0.4711
-  will ignore all devices ranging from 0.0.0023 to 0.0.0042 and the device
-  0.0.4711, if detected.
-  As another example,
-       cio_ignore=all,!0.0.4711,!0.0.fd00-0.0.fd02
-  will ignore all devices but 0.0.4711, 0.0.fd00, 0.0.fd01, 0.0.fd02.
-
-  By default, no devices are ignored.
-
-
-/proc entries
--------------
-
-* /proc/cio_ignore
-
-  Lists the ranges of devices (by bus id) which are ignored by common I/O.
-
-  You can un-ignore certain or all devices by piping to /proc/cio_ignore. 
-  "free all" will un-ignore all ignored devices, 
-  "free <device range>, <device range>, ..." will un-ignore the specified
-  devices.
-
-  For example, if devices 0.0.0023 to 0.0.0042 and 0.0.4711 are ignored,
-  - echo free 0.0.0030-0.0.0032 > /proc/cio_ignore
-    will un-ignore devices 0.0.0030 to 0.0.0032 and will leave devices 0.0.0023
-    to 0.0.002f, 0.0.0033 to 0.0.0042 and 0.0.4711 ignored;
-  - echo free 0.0.0041 > /proc/cio_ignore will furthermore un-ignore device
-    0.0.0041;
-  - echo free all > /proc/cio_ignore will un-ignore all remaining ignored 
-    devices.
-
-  When a device is un-ignored, device recognition and sensing is performed and 
-  the device driver will be notified if possible, so the device will become
-  available to the system. Note that un-ignoring is performed asynchronously.
-
-  You can also add ranges of devices to be ignored by piping to 
-  /proc/cio_ignore; "add <device range>, <device range>, ..." will ignore the
-  specified devices.
-
-  Note: While already known devices can be added to the list of devices to be
-        ignored, there will be no effect on then. However, if such a device
-       disappears and then reappears, it will then be ignored. To make
-       known devices go away, you need the "purge" command (see below).
-
-  For example,
-       "echo add 0.0.a000-0.0.accc, 0.0.af00-0.0.afff > /proc/cio_ignore"
-  will add 0.0.a000-0.0.accc and 0.0.af00-0.0.afff to the list of ignored
-  devices.
-
-  You can remove already known but now ignored devices via
-       "echo purge > /proc/cio_ignore"
-  All devices ignored but still registered and not online (= not in use)
-  will be deregistered and thus removed from the system.
-
-  The devices can be specified either by bus id (0.x.abcd) or, for 2.4 backward
-  compatibility, by the device number in hexadecimal (0xabcd or abcd). Device
-  numbers given as 0xabcd will be interpreted as 0.0.abcd.
-
-* /proc/cio_settle
-
-  A write request to this file is blocked until all queued cio actions are
-  handled. This will allow userspace to wait for pending work affecting
-  device availability after changing cio_ignore or the hardware configuration.
-
-* For some of the information present in the /proc filesystem in 2.4 (namely,
-  /proc/subchannels and /proc/chpids), see driver-model.txt.
-  Information formerly in /proc/irq_count is now in /proc/interrupts.
-
-
-debugfs entries
----------------
-
-* /sys/kernel/debug/s390dbf/cio_*/ (S/390 debug feature)
-
-  Some views generated by the debug feature to hold various debug outputs.
-
-  - /sys/kernel/debug/s390dbf/cio_crw/sprintf
-    Messages from the processing of pending channel report words (machine check
-    handling).
-
-  - /sys/kernel/debug/s390dbf/cio_msg/sprintf
-    Various debug messages from the common I/O-layer.
-
-  - /sys/kernel/debug/s390dbf/cio_trace/hex_ascii
-    Logs the calling of functions in the common I/O-layer and, if applicable, 
-    which subchannel they were called for, as well as dumps of some data
-    structures (like irb in an error case).
-
-  The level of logging can be changed to be more or less verbose by piping to 
-  /sys/kernel/debug/s390dbf/cio_*/level a number between 0 and 6; see the
-  documentation on the S/390 debug feature (Documentation/s390/s390dbf.txt)
-  for details.
diff --git a/Documentation/s390/DASD b/Documentation/s390/DASD
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 9963f1e..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,73 +0,0 @@
-DASD device driver
-
-S/390's disk devices (DASDs) are managed by Linux via the DASD device
-driver. It is valid for all types of DASDs and represents them to
-Linux as block devices, namely "dd". Currently the DASD driver uses a
-single major number (254) and 4 minor numbers per volume (1 for the
-physical volume and 3 for partitions). With respect to partitions see
-below. Thus you may have up to 64 DASD devices in your system.
-
-The kernel parameter 'dasd=from-to,...' may be issued arbitrary times
-in the kernel's parameter line or not at all. The 'from' and 'to'
-parameters are to be given in hexadecimal notation without a leading
-0x.
-If you supply kernel parameters the different instances are processed
-in order of appearance and a minor number is reserved for any device
-covered by the supplied range up to 64 volumes. Additional DASDs are
-ignored. If you do not supply the 'dasd=' kernel parameter at all, the 
-DASD driver registers all supported DASDs of your system to a minor
-number in ascending order of the subchannel number.
-
-The driver currently supports ECKD-devices and there are stubs for
-support of the FBA and CKD architectures. For the FBA architecture
-only some smart data structures are missing to make the support
-complete. 
-We performed our testing on 3380 and 3390 type disks of different
-sizes, under VM and on the bare hardware (LPAR), using internal disks
-of the multiprise as well as a RAMAC virtual array. Disks exported by
-an Enterprise Storage Server (Seascape) should work fine as well.
-
-We currently implement one partition per volume, which is the whole
-volume, skipping the first blocks up to the volume label. These are
-reserved for IPL records and IBM's volume label to assure
-accessibility of the DASD from other OSs. In a later stage we will
-provide support of partitions, maybe VTOC oriented or using a kind of
-partition table in the label record.
-
-USAGE
-
--Low-level format (?CKD only)
-For using an ECKD-DASD as a Linux harddisk you have to low-level
-format the tracks by issuing the BLKDASDFORMAT-ioctl on that
-device. This will erase any data on that volume including IBM volume
-labels, VTOCs etc. The ioctl may take a 'struct format_data *' or
-'NULL' as an argument.  
-typedef struct {
-       int start_unit;
-       int stop_unit;
-       int blksize;
-} format_data_t;
-When a NULL argument is passed to the BLKDASDFORMAT ioctl the whole
-disk is formatted to a blocksize of 1024 bytes. Otherwise start_unit
-and stop_unit are the first and last track to be formatted. If
-stop_unit is -1 it implies that the DASD is formatted from start_unit
-up to the last track. blksize can be any power of two between 512 and
-4096. We recommend no blksize lower than 1024 because the ext2fs uses
-1kB blocks anyway and you gain approx. 50% of capacity increasing your
-blksize from 512 byte to 1kB.
-
--Make a filesystem
-Then you can mk??fs the filesystem of your choice on that volume or
-partition. For reasons of sanity you should build your filesystem on
-the partition /dev/dd?1 instead of the whole volume. You only lose 3kB 
-but may be sure that you can reuse your data after introduction of a
-real partition table.
-
-BUGS:
-- Performance sometimes is rather low because we don't fully exploit clustering
-
-TODO-List:
-- Add IBM'S Disk layout to genhd
-- Enhance driver to use more than one major number
-- Enable usage as a module
-- Support Cache fast write and DASD fast write (ECKD)
diff --git a/Documentation/s390/Debugging390.txt b/Documentation/s390/Debugging390.txt
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 5ae7f86..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,2142 +0,0 @@
-
-                 Debugging on Linux for s/390 & z/Architecture
-                                      by
-         Denis Joseph Barrow (djbarrow@de.ibm.com,barrow_dj@yahoo.com)
-    Copyright (C) 2000-2001 IBM Deutschland Entwicklung GmbH, IBM Corporation
-                       Best viewed with fixed width fonts
-
-Overview of Document:
-=====================
-This document is intended to give a good overview of how to debug Linux for
-s/390 and z/Architecture. It is not intended as a complete reference and not a
-tutorial on the fundamentals of C & assembly. It doesn't go into
-390 IO in any detail. It is intended to complement the documents in the
-reference section below & any other worthwhile references you get.
-
-It is intended like the Enterprise Systems Architecture/390 Reference Summary
-to be printed out & used as a quick cheat sheet self help style reference when
-problems occur.
-
-Contents
-========
-Register Set
-Address Spaces on Intel Linux
-Address Spaces on Linux for s/390 & z/Architecture
-The Linux for s/390 & z/Architecture Kernel Task Structure
-Register Usage & Stackframes on Linux for s/390 & z/Architecture
-A sample program with comments
-Compiling programs for debugging on Linux for s/390 & z/Architecture
-Debugging under VM
-s/390 & z/Architecture IO Overview
-Debugging IO on s/390 & z/Architecture under VM
-GDB on s/390 & z/Architecture
-Stack chaining in gdb by hand
-Examining core dumps
-ldd
-Debugging modules
-The proc file system
-SysRq
-References
-Special Thanks
-
-Register Set
-============
-The current architectures have the following registers.
-16 General propose registers, 32 bit on s/390 and 64 bit on z/Architecture,
-r0-r15 (or gpr0-gpr15), used for arithmetic and addressing.
-
-16 Control registers, 32 bit on s/390 and 64 bit on z/Architecture, cr0-cr15,
-kernel usage only, used for memory management, interrupt control, debugging
-control etc.
-
-16 Access registers (ar0-ar15), 32 bit on both s/390 and z/Architecture,
-normally not used by normal programs but potentially could be used as
-temporary storage. These registers have a 1:1 association with general
-purpose registers and are designed to be used in the so-called access
-register mode to select different address spaces.
-Access register 0 (and access register 1 on z/Architecture, which needs a
-64 bit pointer) is currently used by the pthread library as a pointer to
-the current running threads private area.
-
-16 64 bit floating point registers (fp0-fp15 ) IEEE & HFP floating 
-point format compliant on G5 upwards & a Floating point control reg (FPC) 
-4  64 bit registers (fp0,fp2,fp4 & fp6) HFP only on older machines.
-Note:
-Linux (currently) always uses IEEE & emulates G5 IEEE format on older machines,
-( provided the kernel is configured for this ).
-
-
-The PSW is the most important register on the machine it
-is 64 bit on s/390 & 128 bit on z/Architecture & serves the roles of 
-a program counter (pc), condition code register,memory space designator.
-In IBM standard notation I am counting bit 0 as the MSB.
-It has several advantages over a normal program counter
-in that you can change address translation & program counter 
-in a single instruction. To change address translation,
-e.g. switching address translation off requires that you
-have a logical=physical mapping for the address you are
-currently running at.
-
-      Bit           Value
-s/390 z/Architecture
-0       0     Reserved ( must be 0 ) otherwise specification exception occurs.
-
-1       1     Program Event Recording 1 PER enabled, 
-             PER is used to facilitate debugging e.g. single stepping.
-
-2-4    2-4    Reserved ( must be 0 ). 
-
-5       5     Dynamic address translation 1=DAT on.
-
-6       6     Input/Output interrupt Mask
-
-7      7     External interrupt Mask used primarily for interprocessor
-             signalling and clock interrupts.
-
-8-11  8-11    PSW Key used for complex memory protection mechanism
-             (not used under linux)
-
-12      12    1 on s/390 0 on z/Architecture
-
-13      13    Machine Check Mask 1=enable machine check interrupts
-
-14     14    Wait State. Set this to 1 to stop the processor except for
-             interrupts and give  time to other LPARS. Used in CPU idle in
-             the kernel to increase overall usage of processor resources.
-
-15      15    Problem state ( if set to 1 certain instructions are disabled )
-             all linux user programs run with this bit 1 
-             ( useful info for debugging under VM ).
-
-16-17 16-17   Address Space Control
-
-             00 Primary Space Mode:
-             The register CR1 contains the primary address-space control ele-
-             ment (PASCE), which points to the primary space region/segment
-             table origin.
-
-             01 Access register mode
-
-             10 Secondary Space Mode:
-             The register CR7 contains the secondary address-space control
-             element (SASCE), which points to the secondary space region or
-             segment table origin.
-
-             11 Home Space Mode:
-             The register CR13 contains the home space address-space control
-             element (HASCE), which points to the home space region/segment
-             table origin.
-
-             See "Address Spaces on Linux for s/390 & z/Architecture" below
-             for more information about address space usage in Linux.
-
-18-19 18-19   Condition codes (CC)
-
-20    20      Fixed point overflow mask if 1=FPU exceptions for this event 
-              occur ( normally 0 ) 
-
-21    21      Decimal overflow mask if 1=FPU exceptions for this event occur 
-              ( normally 0 )
-
-22    22      Exponent underflow mask if 1=FPU exceptions for this event occur 
-              ( normally 0 )
-
-23    23      Significance Mask if 1=FPU exceptions for this event occur 
-              ( normally 0 )
-
-24-31 24-30   Reserved Must be 0.
-
-      31      Extended Addressing Mode
-      32      Basic Addressing Mode
-              Used to set addressing mode
-             PSW 31   PSW 32
-                0         0        24 bit
-                0         1        31 bit
-                1         1        64 bit
-
-32             1=31 bit addressing mode 0=24 bit addressing mode (for backward 
-               compatibility), linux always runs with this bit set to 1
-
-33-64          Instruction address.
-      33-63    Reserved must be 0
-      64-127   Address
-               In 24 bits mode bits 64-103=0 bits 104-127 Address 
-               In 31 bits mode bits 64-96=0 bits 97-127 Address
-               Note: unlike 31 bit mode on s/390 bit 96 must be zero
-              when loading the address with LPSWE otherwise a 
-               specification exception occurs, LPSW is fully backward
-               compatible.
-
-
-Prefix Page(s)
---------------
-This per cpu memory area is too intimately tied to the processor not to mention.
-It exists between the real addresses 0-4096 on s/390 and between 0-8192 on
-z/Architecture and is exchanged with one page on s/390 or two pages on
-z/Architecture in absolute storage by the set prefix instruction during Linux
-startup.
-This page is mapped to a different prefix for each processor in an SMP
-configuration (assuming the OS designer is sane of course).
-Bytes 0-512 (200 hex) on s/390 and 0-512, 4096-4544, 4604-5119 currently on
-z/Architecture are used by the processor itself for holding such information
-as exception indications and entry points for exceptions.
-Bytes after 0xc00 hex are used by linux for per processor globals on s/390 and
-z/Architecture (there is a gap on z/Architecture currently between 0xc00 and
-0x1000, too, which is used by Linux).
-The closest thing to this on traditional architectures is the interrupt
-vector table. This is a good thing & does simplify some of the kernel coding
-however it means that we now cannot catch stray NULL pointers in the
-kernel without hard coded checks.
-
-
-
-Address Spaces on Intel Linux
-=============================
-
-The traditional Intel Linux is approximately mapped as follows forgive
-the ascii art.
-0xFFFFFFFF 4GB Himem           *****************
-                               *               *
-                               * Kernel Space  *
-                               *               *
-                               *****************         ****************
-User Space Himem               *  User Stack   *         *              *
-(typically 0xC0000000 3GB )    *****************         *              *
-                               *  Shared Libs  *         * Next Process *
-                               *****************         *     to       *
-                               *               *   <==   *     Run      *  <==
-                               *  User Program *         *              *
-                               *   Data BSS    *         *              *
-                               *    Text       *         *              *
-                               *   Sections    *         *              *
-0x00000000                     *****************         ****************
-
-Now it is easy to see that on Intel it is quite easy to recognise a kernel
-address as being one greater than user space himem (in this case 0xC0000000),
-and addresses of less than this are the ones in the current running program on
-this processor (if an smp box).
-If using the virtual machine ( VM ) as a debugger it is quite difficult to
-know which user process is running as the address space you are looking at
-could be from any process in the run queue.
-
-The limitation of Intels addressing technique is that the linux
-kernel uses a very simple real address to virtual addressing technique
-of Real Address=Virtual Address-User Space Himem.
-This means that on Intel the kernel linux can typically only address
-Himem=0xFFFFFFFF-0xC0000000=1GB & this is all the RAM these machines
-can typically use.
-They can lower User Himem to 2GB or lower & thus be
-able to use 2GB of RAM however this shrinks the maximum size
-of User Space from 3GB to 2GB they have a no win limit of 4GB unless
-they go to 64 Bit.
-
-
-On 390 our limitations & strengths make us slightly different.
-For backward compatibility we are only allowed use 31 bits (2GB)
-of our 32 bit addresses, however, we use entirely separate address 
-spaces for the user & kernel.
-
-This means we can support 2GB of non Extended RAM on s/390, & more
-with the Extended memory management swap device & 
-currently 4TB of physical memory currently on z/Architecture.
-
-
-Address Spaces on Linux for s/390 & z/Architecture
-==================================================
-
-Our addressing scheme is basically as follows:
-
-                                  Primary Space               Home Space
-Himem 0x7fffffff 2GB on s/390    *****************          ****************
-currently 0x3ffffffffff (2^42)-1 *  User Stack   *          *              *
-on z/Architecture.              *****************          *              *
-                                *  Shared Libs  *          *              *
-                                *****************          *              *
-                                *               *          *    Kernel    *  
-                                *  User Program *          *              *
-                                *   Data BSS    *          *              *
-                                 *    Text       *          *              *
-                                *   Sections    *          *              *
-0x00000000                       *****************          ****************
-
-This also means that we need to look at the PSW problem state bit and the
-addressing mode to decide whether we are looking at user or kernel space.
-
-User space runs in primary address mode (or access register mode within
-the vdso code).
-
-The kernel usually also runs in home space mode, however when accessing
-user space the kernel switches to primary or secondary address mode if
-the mvcos instruction is not available or if a compare-and-swap (futex)
-instruction on a user space address is performed.
-
-When also looking at the ASCE control registers, this means:
-
-User space:
-- runs in primary or access register mode
-- cr1 contains the user asce
-- cr7 contains the user asce
-- cr13 contains the kernel asce
-
-Kernel space:
-- runs in home space mode
-- cr1 contains the user or kernel asce
-  -> the kernel asce is loaded when a uaccess requires primary or
-     secondary address mode
-- cr7 contains the user or kernel asce, (changed with set_fs())
-- cr13 contains the kernel asce
-
-In case of uaccess the kernel changes to:
-- primary space mode in case of a uaccess (copy_to_user) and uses
-  e.g. the mvcp instruction to access user space. However the kernel
-  will stay in home space mode if the mvcos instruction is available
-- secondary space mode in case of futex atomic operations, so that the
-  instructions come from primary address space and data from secondary
-  space
-
-In case of KVM, the kernel runs in home space mode, but cr1 gets switched
-to contain the gmap asce before the SIE instruction gets executed. When
-the SIE instruction is finished, cr1 will be switched back to contain the
-user asce.
-
-
-Virtual Addresses on s/390 & z/Architecture
-===========================================
-
-A virtual address on s/390 is made up of 3 parts
-The SX (segment index, roughly corresponding to the PGD & PMD in Linux
-terminology) being bits 1-11.
-The PX (page index, corresponding to the page table entry (pte) in Linux
-terminology) being bits 12-19.
-The remaining bits BX (the byte index are the offset in the page )
-i.e. bits 20 to 31.
-
-On z/Architecture in linux we currently make up an address from 4 parts.
-The region index bits (RX) 0-32 we currently use bits 22-32
-The segment index (SX) being bits 33-43
-The page index (PX) being bits  44-51
-The byte index (BX) being bits  52-63
-
-Notes:
-1) s/390 has no PMD so the PMD is really the PGD also.
-A lot of this stuff is defined in pgtable.h.
-
-2) Also seeing as s/390's page indexes are only 1k  in size 
-(bits 12-19 x 4 bytes per pte ) we use 1 ( page 4k )
-to make the best use of memory by updating 4 segment indices 
-entries each time we mess with a PMD & use offsets 
-0,1024,2048 & 3072 in this page as for our segment indexes.
-On z/Architecture our page indexes are now 2k in size
-( bits 12-19 x 8 bytes per pte ) we do a similar trick
-but only mess with 2 segment indices each time we mess with
-a PMD.
-
-3) As z/Architecture supports up to a massive 5-level page table lookup we
-can only use 3 currently on Linux ( as this is all the generic kernel
-currently supports ) however this may change in future
-this allows us to access ( according to my sums )
-4TB of virtual storage per process i.e.
-4096*512(PTES)*1024(PMDS)*2048(PGD) = 4398046511104 bytes,
-enough for another 2 or 3 of years I think :-).
-to do this we use a region-third-table designation type in
-our address space control registers.
-
-The Linux for s/390 & z/Architecture Kernel Task Structure
-==========================================================
-Each process/thread under Linux for S390 has its own kernel task_struct
-defined in linux/include/linux/sched.h
-The S390 on initialisation & resuming of a process on a cpu sets
-the __LC_KERNEL_STACK variable in the spare prefix area for this cpu
-(which we use for per-processor globals).
-
-The kernel stack pointer is intimately tied with the task structure for
-each processor as follows.
-
-                      s/390
-            ************************
-            *  1 page kernel stack *
-           *        ( 4K )        *
-            ************************
-            *   1 page task_struct *        
-            *        ( 4K )        *
-8K aligned  ************************ 
-
-                 z/Architecture
-            ************************
-            *  2 page kernel stack *
-           *        ( 8K )        *
-            ************************
-            *  2 page task_struct  *        
-            *        ( 8K )        *
-16K aligned ************************ 
-
-What this means is that we don't need to dedicate any register or global
-variable to point to the current running process & can retrieve it with the
-following very simple construct for s/390 & one very similar for z/Architecture.
-
-static inline struct task_struct * get_current(void)
-{
-        struct task_struct *current;
-        __asm__("lhi   %0,-8192\n\t"
-                "nr    %0,15"
-                : "=r" (current) );
-        return current;
-}
-
-i.e. just anding the current kernel stack pointer with the mask -8192.
-Thankfully because Linux doesn't have support for nested IO interrupts
-& our devices have large buffers can survive interrupts being shut for 
-short amounts of time we don't need a separate stack for interrupts.
-
-
-
-
-Register Usage & Stackframes on Linux for s/390 & z/Architecture
-=================================================================
-Overview:
----------
-This is the code that gcc produces at the top & the bottom of
-each function. It usually is fairly consistent & similar from 
-function to function & if you know its layout you can probably
-make some headway in finding the ultimate cause of a problem
-after a crash without a source level debugger.
-
-Note: To follow stackframes requires a knowledge of C or Pascal &
-limited knowledge of one assembly language.
-
-It should be noted that there are some differences between the
-s/390 and z/Architecture stack layouts as the z/Architecture stack layout
-didn't have to maintain compatibility with older linkage formats.
-
-Glossary:
----------
-alloca:
-This is a built in compiler function for runtime allocation
-of extra space on the callers stack which is obviously freed
-up on function exit ( e.g. the caller may choose to allocate nothing
-of a buffer of 4k if required for temporary purposes ), it generates 
-very efficient code ( a few cycles  ) when compared to alternatives 
-like malloc.
-
-automatics: These are local variables on the stack,
-i.e they aren't in registers & they aren't static.
-
-back-chain:
-This is a pointer to the stack pointer before entering a
-framed functions ( see frameless function ) prologue got by 
-dereferencing the address of the current stack pointer,
- i.e. got by accessing the 32 bit value at the stack pointers
-current location.
-
-base-pointer:
-This is a pointer to the back of the literal pool which
-is an area just behind each procedure used to store constants
-in each function.
-
-call-clobbered: The caller probably needs to save these registers if there 
-is something of value in them, on the stack or elsewhere before making a 
-call to another procedure so that it can restore it later.
-
-epilogue:
-The code generated by the compiler to return to the caller.
-
-frameless-function
-A frameless function in Linux for s390 & z/Architecture is one which doesn't 
-need more than the register save area (96 bytes on s/390, 160 on z/Architecture)
-given to it by the caller.
-A frameless function never:
-1) Sets up a back chain.
-2) Calls alloca.
-3) Calls other normal functions
-4) Has automatics.
-
-GOT-pointer:
-This is a pointer to the global-offset-table in ELF
-( Executable Linkable Format, Linux'es most common executable format ),
-all globals & shared library objects are found using this pointer.
-
-lazy-binding
-ELF shared libraries are typically only loaded when routines in the shared
-library are actually first called at runtime. This is lazy binding.
-
-procedure-linkage-table
-This is a table found from the GOT which contains pointers to routines
-in other shared libraries which can't be called to by easier means.
-
-prologue:
-The code generated by the compiler to set up the stack frame.
-
-outgoing-args:
-This is extra area allocated on the stack of the calling function if the
-parameters for the callee's cannot all be put in registers, the same
-area can be reused by each function the caller calls.
-
-routine-descriptor:
-A COFF  executable format based concept of a procedure reference 
-actually being 8 bytes or more as opposed to a simple pointer to the routine.
-This is typically defined as follows
-Routine Descriptor offset 0=Pointer to Function
-Routine Descriptor offset 4=Pointer to Table of Contents
-The table of contents/TOC is roughly equivalent to a GOT pointer.
-& it means that shared libraries etc. can be shared between several
-environments each with their own TOC.
-
-static-chain: This is used in nested functions a concept adopted from pascal 
-by gcc not used in ansi C or C++ ( although quite useful ), basically it
-is a pointer used to reference local variables of enclosing functions.
-You might come across this stuff once or twice in your lifetime.
-
-e.g.
-The function below should return 11 though gcc may get upset & toss warnings 
-about unused variables.
-int FunctionA(int a)
-{
-       int b;
-       FunctionC(int c)
-       {
-               b=c+1;
-       }
-       FunctionC(10);
-       return(b);
-}
-
-
-s/390 & z/Architecture Register usage
-=====================================
-r0       used by syscalls/assembly                  call-clobbered
-r1      used by syscalls/assembly                  call-clobbered
-r2       argument 0 / return value 0                call-clobbered
-r3       argument 1 / return value 1 (if long long) call-clobbered
-r4       argument 2                                 call-clobbered
-r5       argument 3                                 call-clobbered
-r6      argument 4                                 saved
-r7       pointer-to arguments 5 to ...              saved      
-r8       this & that                                saved
-r9       this & that                                saved
-r10      static-chain ( if nested function )        saved
-r11      frame-pointer ( if function used alloca )  saved
-r12      got-pointer                                saved
-r13      base-pointer                               saved
-r14      return-address                             saved
-r15      stack-pointer                              saved
-
-f0       argument 0 / return value ( float/double ) call-clobbered
-f2       argument 1                                 call-clobbered
-f4       z/Architecture argument 2                  saved
-f6       z/Architecture argument 3                  saved
-The remaining floating points
-f1,f3,f5 f7-f15 are call-clobbered.
-
-Notes:
-------
-1) The only requirement is that registers which are used
-by the callee are saved, e.g. the compiler is perfectly
-capable of using r11 for purposes other than a frame a
-frame pointer if a frame pointer is not needed.
-2) In functions with variable arguments e.g. printf the calling procedure 
-is identical to one without variable arguments & the same number of 
-parameters. However, the prologue of this function is somewhat more
-hairy owing to it having to move these parameters to the stack to
-get va_start, va_arg & va_end to work.
-3) Access registers are currently unused by gcc but are used in
-the kernel. Possibilities exist to use them at the moment for
-temporary storage but it isn't recommended.
-4) Only 4 of the floating point registers are used for
-parameter passing as older machines such as G3 only have only 4
-& it keeps the stack frame compatible with other compilers.
-However with IEEE floating point emulation under linux on the
-older machines you are free to use the other 12.
-5) A long long or double parameter cannot be have the 
-first 4 bytes in a register & the second four bytes in the 
-outgoing args area. It must be purely in the outgoing args
-area if crossing this boundary.
-6) Floating point parameters are mixed with outgoing args
-on the outgoing args area in the order the are passed in as parameters.
-7) Floating point arguments 2 & 3 are saved in the outgoing args area for 
-z/Architecture
-
-
-Stack Frame Layout
-------------------
-s/390     z/Architecture
-0         0             back chain ( a 0 here signifies end of back chain )
-4         8             eos ( end of stack, not used on Linux for S390 used in other linkage formats )
-8         16            glue used in other s/390 linkage formats for saved routine descriptors etc.
-12        24            glue used in other s/390 linkage formats for saved routine descriptors etc.
-16        32            scratch area
-20        40            scratch area
-24        48            saved r6 of caller function
-28        56            saved r7 of caller function
-32        64            saved r8 of caller function
-36        72            saved r9 of caller function
-40        80            saved r10 of caller function
-44        88            saved r11 of caller function
-48        96            saved r12 of caller function
-52        104           saved r13 of caller function
-56        112           saved r14 of caller function
-60        120           saved r15 of caller function
-64        128           saved f4 of caller function
-72        132           saved f6 of caller function
-80                      undefined
-96        160           outgoing args passed from caller to callee
-96+x      160+x         possible stack alignment ( 8 bytes desirable )
-96+x+y    160+x+y       alloca space of caller ( if used )
-96+x+y+z  160+x+y+z     automatics of caller ( if used )
-0                       back-chain
-
-A sample program with comments.
-===============================
-
-Comments on the function test
------------------------------
-1) It didn't need to set up a pointer to the constant pool gpr13 as it is not
-used ( :-( ).
-2) This is a frameless function & no stack is bought.
-3) The compiler was clever enough to recognise that it could return the
-value in r2 as well as use it for the passed in parameter ( :-) ).
-4) The basr ( branch relative & save ) trick works as follows the instruction 
-has a special case with r0,r0 with some instruction operands is understood as 
-the literal value 0, some risc architectures also do this ). So now
-we are branching to the next address & the address new program counter is
-in r13,so now we subtract the size of the function prologue we have executed
-+ the size of the literal pool to get to the top of the literal pool
-0040037c int test(int b)
-{                                                          # Function prologue below
-  40037c:      90 de f0 34     stm     %r13,%r14,52(%r15) # Save registers r13 & r14
-  400380:      0d d0           basr    %r13,%r0           # Set up pointer to constant pool using
-  400382:      a7 da ff fa     ahi     %r13,-6            # basr trick
-       return(5+b);
-                                                          # Huge main program
-  400386:      a7 2a 00 05     ahi     %r2,5              # add 5 to r2
-
-                                                           # Function epilogue below 
-  40038a:      98 de f0 34     lm      %r13,%r14,52(%r15) # restore registers r13 & 14
-  40038e:      07 fe           br      %r14               # return
-}
-
-Comments on the function main
------------------------------
-1) The compiler did this function optimally ( 8-) )
-
-Literal pool for main.
-400390:        ff ff ff ec     .long 0xffffffec
-main(int argc,char *argv[])
-{                                                          # Function prologue below
-  400394:      90 bf f0 2c     stm     %r11,%r15,44(%r15) # Save necessary registers
-  400398:      18 0f           lr      %r0,%r15           # copy stack pointer to r0
-  40039a:      a7 fa ff a0     ahi     %r15,-96           # Make area for callee saving 
-  40039e:      0d d0           basr    %r13,%r0           # Set up r13 to point to
-  4003a0:      a7 da ff f0     ahi     %r13,-16           # literal pool
-  4003a4:      50 00 f0 00     st      %r0,0(%r15)        # Save backchain
-
-       return(test(5));                                   # Main Program Below
-  4003a8:      58 e0 d0 00     l       %r14,0(%r13)       # load relative address of test from
-                                                          # literal pool
-  4003ac:      a7 28 00 05     lhi     %r2,5              # Set first parameter to 5
-  4003b0:      4d ee d0 00     bas     %r14,0(%r14,%r13)  # jump to test setting r14 as return
-                                                          # address using branch & save instruction.
-
-                                                          # Function Epilogue below
-  4003b4:      98 bf f0 8c     lm      %r11,%r15,140(%r15)# Restore necessary registers.
-  4003b8:      07 fe           br      %r14               # return to do program exit 
-}
-
-
-Compiler updates
-----------------
-
-main(int argc,char *argv[])
-{
-  4004fc:      90 7f f0 1c             stm     %r7,%r15,28(%r15)
-  400500:      a7 d5 00 04             bras    %r13,400508 <main+0xc>
-  400504:      00 40 04 f4             .long   0x004004f4 
-  # compiler now puts constant pool in code to so it saves an instruction 
-  400508:      18 0f                   lr      %r0,%r15
-  40050a:      a7 fa ff a0             ahi     %r15,-96
-  40050e:      50 00 f0 00             st      %r0,0(%r15)
-       return(test(5));
-  400512:      58 10 d0 00             l       %r1,0(%r13)
-  400516:      a7 28 00 05             lhi     %r2,5
-  40051a:      0d e1                   basr    %r14,%r1
-  # compiler adds 1 extra instruction to epilogue this is done to
-  # avoid processor pipeline stalls owing to data dependencies on g5 &
-  # above as register 14 in the old code was needed directly after being loaded 
-  # by the lm  %r11,%r15,140(%r15) for the br %14.
-  40051c:      58 40 f0 98             l       %r4,152(%r15)
-  400520:      98 7f f0 7c             lm      %r7,%r15,124(%r15)
-  400524:      07 f4                   br      %r4
-}
-
-
-Hartmut ( our compiler developer ) also has been threatening to take out the
-stack backchain in optimised code as this also causes pipeline stalls, you
-have been warned.
-
-64 bit z/Architecture code disassembly
---------------------------------------
-
-If you understand the stuff above you'll understand the stuff
-below too so I'll avoid repeating myself & just say that 
-some of the instructions have g's on the end of them to indicate
-they are 64 bit & the stack offsets are a bigger, 
-the only other difference you'll find between 32 & 64 bit is that
-we now use f4 & f6 for floating point arguments on 64 bit.
-00000000800005b0 <test>:
-int test(int b)
-{
-       return(5+b);
-    800005b0:  a7 2a 00 05             ahi     %r2,5
-    800005b4:  b9 14 00 22             lgfr    %r2,%r2 # downcast to integer
-    800005b8:  07 fe                   br      %r14
-    800005ba:  07 07                   bcr     0,%r7
-
-
-}
-
-00000000800005bc <main>:
-main(int argc,char *argv[])
-{ 
-    800005bc:  eb bf f0 58 00 24       stmg    %r11,%r15,88(%r15)
-    800005c2:  b9 04 00 1f             lgr     %r1,%r15
-    800005c6:  a7 fb ff 60             aghi    %r15,-160
-    800005ca:  e3 10 f0 00 00 24       stg     %r1,0(%r15)
-       return(test(5));
-    800005d0:  a7 29 00 05             lghi    %r2,5
-    # brasl allows jumps > 64k & is overkill here bras would do fune
-    800005d4:  c0 e5 ff ff ff ee       brasl   %r14,800005b0 <test> 
-    800005da:  e3 40 f1 10 00 04       lg      %r4,272(%r15)
-    800005e0:  eb bf f0 f8 00 04       lmg     %r11,%r15,248(%r15)
-    800005e6:  07 f4                   br      %r4
-}
-
-
-
-Compiling programs for debugging on Linux for s/390 & z/Architecture
-====================================================================
--gdwarf-2 now works it should be considered the default debugging
-format for s/390 & z/Architecture as it is more reliable for debugging
-shared libraries,  normal -g debugging works much better now
-Thanks to the IBM java compiler developers bug reports. 
-
-This is typically done adding/appending the flags -g or -gdwarf-2 to the 
-CFLAGS & LDFLAGS variables Makefile of the program concerned.
-
-If using gdb & you would like accurate displays of registers &
- stack traces compile without optimisation i.e make sure
-that there is no -O2 or similar on the CFLAGS line of the Makefile &
-the emitted gcc commands, obviously this will produce worse code 
-( not advisable for shipment ) but it is an  aid to the debugging process.
-
-This aids debugging because the compiler will copy parameters passed in
-in registers onto the stack so backtracing & looking at passed in
-parameters will work, however some larger programs which use inline functions
-will not compile without optimisation.
-
-Debugging with optimisation has since much improved after fixing
-some bugs, please make sure you are using gdb-5.0 or later developed 
-after Nov'2000.
-
-
-
-Debugging under VM
-==================
-
-Notes
------
-Addresses & values in the VM debugger are always hex never decimal
-Address ranges are of the format <HexValue1>-<HexValue2> or
-<HexValue1>.<HexValue2>
-For example, the address range 0x2000 to 0x3000 can be described as 2000-3000
-or 2000.1000
-
-The VM Debugger is case insensitive.
-
-VM's strengths are usually other debuggers weaknesses you can get at any
-resource no matter how sensitive e.g. memory management resources, change
-address translation in the PSW. For kernel hacking you will reap dividends if
-you get good at it.
-
-The VM Debugger displays operators but not operands, and also the debugger
-displays useful information on the same line as the author of the code probably
-felt that it was a good idea not to go over the 80 columns on the screen.
-This isn't as unintuitive as it may seem as the s/390 instructions are easy to
-decode mentally and you can make a good guess at a lot of them as all the
-operands are nibble (half byte aligned).
-So if you have an objdump listing by hand, it is quite easy to follow, and if
-you don't have an objdump listing keep a copy of the s/390 Reference Summary
-or alternatively the s/390 principles of operation next to you.
-e.g. even I can guess that 
-0001AFF8' LR    180F        CC 0
-is a ( load register ) lr r0,r15 
-
-Also it is very easy to tell the length of a 390 instruction from the 2 most
-significant bits in the instruction (not that this info is really useful except
-if you are trying to make sense of a hexdump of code).
-Here is a table
-Bits                    Instruction Length
-------------------------------------------
-00                          2 Bytes
-01                          4 Bytes
-10                          4 Bytes
-11                          6 Bytes
-
-The debugger also displays other useful info on the same line such as the
-addresses being operated on destination addresses of branches & condition codes.
-e.g.  
-00019736' AHI   A7DAFF0E    CC 1
-000198BA' BRC   A7840004 -> 000198C2'   CC 0
-000198CE' STM   900EF068 >> 0FA95E78    CC 2
-
-
-
-Useful VM debugger commands
----------------------------
-
-I suppose I'd better mention this before I start
-to list the current active traces do 
-Q TR
-there can be a maximum of 255 of these per set
-( more about trace sets later ).
-To stop traces issue a
-TR END.
-To delete a particular breakpoint issue
-TR DEL <breakpoint number>
-
-The PA1 key drops to CP mode so you can issue debugger commands,
-Doing alt c (on my 3270 console at least ) clears the screen. 
-hitting b <enter> comes back to the running operating system
-from cp mode ( in our case linux ).
-It is typically useful to add shortcuts to your profile.exec file
-if you have one ( this is roughly equivalent to autoexec.bat in DOS ).
-file here are a few from mine.
-/* this gives me command history on issuing f12 */
-set pf12 retrieve 
-/* this continues */
-set pf8 imm b
-/* goes to trace set a */
-set pf1 imm tr goto a
-/* goes to trace set b */
-set pf2 imm tr goto b
-/* goes to trace set c */
-set pf3 imm tr goto c
-
-
-
-Instruction Tracing
--------------------
-Setting a simple breakpoint
-TR I PSWA <address>
-To debug a particular function try
-TR I R <function address range>
-TR I on its own will single step.
-TR I DATA <MNEMONIC> <OPTIONAL RANGE> will trace for particular mnemonics
-e.g.
-TR I DATA 4D R 0197BC.4000
-will trace for BAS'es ( opcode 4D ) in the range 0197BC.4000
-if you were inclined you could add traces for all branch instructions &
-suffix them with the run prefix so you would have a backtrace on screen 
-when a program crashes.
-TR BR <INTO OR FROM> will trace branches into or out of an address.
-e.g.
-TR BR INTO 0 is often quite useful if a program is getting awkward & deciding
-to branch to 0 & crashing as this will stop at the address before in jumps to 0.
-TR I R <address range> RUN cmd d g
-single steps a range of addresses but stays running &
-displays the gprs on each step.
-
-
-
-Displaying & modifying Registers
---------------------------------
-D G will display all the gprs
-Adding a extra G to all the commands is necessary to access the full 64 bit 
-content in VM on z/Architecture. Obviously this isn't required for access
-registers as these are still 32 bit.
-e.g. DGG instead of DG 
-D X will display all the control registers
-D AR will display all the access registers
-D AR4-7 will display access registers 4 to 7
-CPU ALL D G will display the GRPS of all CPUS in the configuration
-D PSW will display the current PSW
-st PSW 2000 will put the value 2000 into the PSW &
-cause crash your machine.
-D PREFIX displays the prefix offset
-
-
-Displaying Memory
------------------
-To display memory mapped using the current PSW's mapping try
-D <range>
-To make VM display a message each time it hits a particular address and
-continue try
-D I<range> will disassemble/display a range of instructions.
-ST addr 32 bit word will store a 32 bit aligned address
-D T<range> will display the EBCDIC in an address (if you are that way inclined)
-D R<range> will display real addresses ( without DAT ) but with prefixing.
-There are other complex options to display if you need to get at say home space
-but are in primary space the easiest thing to do is to temporarily
-modify the PSW to the other addressing mode, display the stuff & then
-restore it.
-
-
-Hints
------
-If you want to issue a debugger command without halting your virtual machine
-with the PA1 key try prefixing the command with #CP e.g.
-#cp tr i pswa 2000
-also suffixing most debugger commands with RUN will cause them not
-to stop just display the mnemonic at the current instruction on the console.
-If you have several breakpoints you want to put into your program &
-you get fed up of cross referencing with System.map
-you can do the following trick for several symbols.
-grep do_signal System.map 
-which emits the following among other things
-0001f4e0 T do_signal 
-now you can do
-
-TR I PSWA 0001f4e0 cmd msg * do_signal
-This sends a message to your own console each time do_signal is entered.
-( As an aside I wrote a perl script once which automatically generated a REXX
-script with breakpoints on every kernel procedure, this isn't a good idea
-because there are thousands of these routines & VM can only set 255 breakpoints
-at a time so you nearly had to spend as long pruning the file down as you would 
-entering the msgs by hand), however, the trick might be useful for a single
-object file. In the 3270 terminal emulator x3270 there is a very useful option
-in the file menu called "Save Screen In File" - this is very good for keeping a
-copy of traces.
-
-From CMS help <command name> will give you online help on a particular command. 
-e.g. 
-HELP DISPLAY
-
-Also CP has a file called profile.exec which automatically gets called
-on startup of CMS ( like autoexec.bat ), keeping on a DOS analogy session
-CP has a feature similar to doskey, it may be useful for you to
-use profile.exec to define some keystrokes. 
-e.g.
-SET PF9 IMM B
-This does a single step in VM on pressing F8. 
-SET PF10  ^
-This sets up the ^ key.
-which can be used for ^c (ctrl-c),^z (ctrl-z) which can't be typed directly
-into some 3270 consoles.
-SET PF11 ^-
-This types the starting keystrokes for a sysrq see SysRq below.
-SET PF12 RETRIEVE
-This retrieves command history on pressing F12.
-
-
-Sometimes in VM the display is set up to scroll automatically this
-can be very annoying if there are messages you wish to look at
-to stop this do
-TERM MORE 255 255
-This will nearly stop automatic screen updates, however it will
-cause a denial of service if lots of messages go to the 3270 console,
-so it would be foolish to use this as the default on a production machine.
-
-Tracing particular processes
-----------------------------
-The kernel's text segment is intentionally at an address in memory that it will
-very seldom collide with text segments of user programs ( thanks Martin ),
-this simplifies debugging the kernel.
-However it is quite common for user processes to have addresses which collide
-this can make debugging a particular process under VM painful under normal
-circumstances as the process may change when doing a 
-TR I R <address range>.
-Thankfully after reading VM's online help I figured out how to debug
-I particular process.
-
-Your first problem is to find the STD ( segment table designation )
-of the program you wish to debug.
-There are several ways you can do this here are a few
-1) objdump --syms <program to be debugged> | grep main
-To get the address of main in the program.
-tr i pswa <address of main>
-Start the program, if VM drops to CP on what looks like the entry
-point of the main function this is most likely the process you wish to debug.
-Now do a D X13 or D XG13 on z/Architecture.
-On 31 bit the STD is bits 1-19 ( the STO segment table origin ) 
-& 25-31 ( the STL segment table length ) of CR13.
-now type
-TR I R STD <CR13's value> 0.7fffffff
-e.g.
-TR I R STD 8F32E1FF 0.7fffffff
-Another very useful variation is
-TR STORE INTO STD <CR13's value> <address range>
-for finding out when a particular variable changes.
-
-An alternative way of finding the STD of a currently running process 
-is to do the following, ( this method is more complex but
-could be quite convenient if you aren't updating the kernel much &
-so your kernel structures will stay constant for a reasonable period of
-time ).
-
-grep task /proc/<pid>/status
-from this you should see something like
-task: 0f160000 ksp: 0f161de8 pt_regs: 0f161f68
-This now gives you a pointer to the task structure.
-Now make CC:="s390-gcc -g" kernel/sched.s
-To get the task_struct stabinfo.
-( task_struct is defined in include/linux/sched.h ).
-Now we want to look at
-task->active_mm->pgd
-on my machine the active_mm in the task structure stab is
-active_mm:(4,12),672,32
-its offset is 672/8=84=0x54
-the pgd member in the mm_struct stab is
-pgd:(4,6)=*(29,5),96,32
-so its offset is 96/8=12=0xc
-
-so we'll
-hexdump -s 0xf160054 /dev/mem | more
-i.e. task_struct+active_mm offset
-to look at the active_mm member
-f160054 0fee cc60 0019 e334 0000 0000 0000 0011
-hexdump -s 0x0feecc6c /dev/mem | more
-i.e. active_mm+pgd offset
-feecc6c 0f2c 0000 0000 0001 0000 0001 0000 0010
-we get something like
-now do 
-TR I R STD <pgd|0x7f> 0.7fffffff
-i.e. the 0x7f is added because the pgd only
-gives the page table origin & we need to set the low bits
-to the maximum possible segment table length.
-TR I R STD 0f2c007f 0.7fffffff
-on z/Architecture you'll probably need to do
-TR I R STD <pgd|0x7> 0.ffffffffffffffff
-to set the TableType to 0x1 & the Table length to 3.
-
-
-
-Tracing Program Exceptions
---------------------------
-If you get a crash which says something like
-illegal operation or specification exception followed by a register dump
-You can restart linux & trace these using the tr prog <range or value> trace
-option.
-
-
-The most common ones you will normally be tracing for is
-1=operation exception
-2=privileged operation exception
-4=protection exception
-5=addressing exception
-6=specification exception
-10=segment translation exception
-11=page translation exception
-
-The full list of these is on page 22 of the current s/390 Reference Summary.
-e.g.
-tr prog 10 will trace segment translation exceptions.
-tr prog on its own will trace all program interruption codes.
-
-Trace Sets
-----------
-On starting VM you are initially in the INITIAL trace set.
-You can do a Q TR to verify this.
-If you have a complex tracing situation where you wish to wait for instance 
-till a driver is open before you start tracing IO, but know in your
-heart that you are going to have to make several runs through the code till you
-have a clue whats going on. 
-
-What you can do is
-TR I PSWA <Driver open address>
-hit b to continue till breakpoint
-reach the breakpoint
-now do your
-TR GOTO B 
-TR IO 7c08-7c09 inst int run 
-or whatever the IO channels you wish to trace are & hit b
-
-To got back to the initial trace set do
-TR GOTO INITIAL
-& the TR I PSWA <Driver open address> will be the only active breakpoint again.
-
-
-Tracing linux syscalls under VM
--------------------------------
-Syscalls are implemented on Linux for S390 by the Supervisor call instruction
-(SVC). There 256 possibilities of these as the instruction is made up of a 0xA
-opcode and the second byte being the syscall number. They are traced using the
-simple command:
-TR SVC  <Optional value or range>
-the syscalls are defined in linux/arch/s390/include/asm/unistd.h
-e.g. to trace all file opens just do
-TR SVC 5 ( as this is the syscall number of open )
-
-
-SMP Specific commands
----------------------
-To find out how many cpus you have
-Q CPUS displays all the CPU's available to your virtual machine
-To find the cpu that the current cpu VM debugger commands are being directed at
-do Q CPU to change the current cpu VM debugger commands are being directed at do
-CPU <desired cpu no>
-
-On a SMP guest issue a command to all CPUs try prefixing the command with cpu
-all. To issue a command to a particular cpu try cpu <cpu number> e.g.
-CPU 01 TR I R 2000.3000
-If you are running on a guest with several cpus & you have a IO related problem
-& cannot follow the flow of code but you know it isn't smp related.
-from the bash prompt issue
-shutdown -h now or halt.
-do a Q CPUS to find out how many cpus you have
-detach each one of them from cp except cpu 0 
-by issuing a 
-DETACH CPU 01-(number of cpus in configuration)
-& boot linux again.
-TR SIGP will trace inter processor signal processor instructions.
-DEFINE CPU 01-(number in configuration) 
-will get your guests cpus back.
-
-
-Help for displaying ascii textstrings
--------------------------------------
-On the very latest VM Nucleus'es VM can now display ascii
-( thanks Neale for the hint ) by doing
-D TX<lowaddr>.<len>
-e.g.
-D TX0.100
-
-Alternatively
-=============
-Under older VM debuggers (I love EBDIC too) you can use following little
-program which converts a command line of hex digits to ascii text. It can be
-compiled under linux and you can copy the hex digits from your x3270 terminal
-to your xterm if you are debugging from a linuxbox.
-
-This is quite useful when looking at a parameter passed in as a text string
-under VM ( unless you are good at decoding ASCII in your head ).
-
-e.g. consider tracing an open syscall
-TR SVC 5
-We have stopped at a breakpoint
-000151B0' SVC   0A05     -> 0001909A'   CC 0
-
-D 20.8 to check the SVC old psw in the prefix area and see was it from userspace
-(for the layout of the prefix area consult the "Fixed Storage Locations"
-chapter of the s/390 Reference Summary if you have it available).
-V00000020  070C2000 800151B2
-The problem state bit wasn't set &  it's also too early in the boot sequence
-for it to be a userspace SVC if it was we would have to temporarily switch the 
-psw to user space addressing so we could get at the first parameter of the open
-in gpr2.
-Next do a 
-D G2
-GPR  2 =  00014CB4
-Now display what gpr2 is pointing to
-D 00014CB4.20
-V00014CB4  2F646576 2F636F6E 736F6C65 00001BF5
-V00014CC4  FC00014C B4001001 E0001000 B8070707
-Now copy the text till the first 00 hex ( which is the end of the string
-to an xterm & do hex2ascii on it.
-hex2ascii 2F646576 2F636F6E 736F6C65 00 
-outputs
-Decoded Hex:=/ d e v / c o n s o l e 0x00 
-We were opening the console device,
-
-You can compile the code below yourself for practice :-),
-/*
- *    hex2ascii.c
- *    a useful little tool for converting a hexadecimal command line to ascii
- *
- *    Author(s): Denis Joseph Barrow (djbarrow@de.ibm.com,barrow_dj@yahoo.com)
- *    (C) 2000 IBM Deutschland Entwicklung GmbH, IBM Corporation.
- */   
-#include <stdio.h>
-
-int main(int argc,char *argv[])
-{
-  int cnt1,cnt2,len,toggle=0;
-  int startcnt=1;
-  unsigned char c,hex;
-  
-  if(argc>1&&(strcmp(argv[1],"-a")==0))
-     startcnt=2;
-  printf("Decoded Hex:=");
-  for(cnt1=startcnt;cnt1<argc;cnt1++)
-  {
-    len=strlen(argv[cnt1]);
-    for(cnt2=0;cnt2<len;cnt2++)
-    {
-       c=argv[cnt1][cnt2];
-       if(c>='0'&&c<='9')
-         c=c-'0';
-       if(c>='A'&&c<='F')
-         c=c-'A'+10;
-       if(c>='a'&&c<='f')
-         c=c-'a'+10;
-       switch(toggle)
-       {
-         case 0:
-            hex=c<<4;
-            toggle=1;
-         break;
-         case 1:
-            hex+=c;
-            if(hex<32||hex>127)
-            {
-               if(startcnt==1)
-                  printf("0x%02X ",(int)hex);
-               else
-                  printf(".");
-            }
-            else
-            {
-              printf("%c",hex);
-              if(startcnt==1)
-                 printf(" ");
-            }
-            toggle=0;
-         break;
-       }
-    }
-  }
-  printf("\n");
-}
-
-
-
-
-Stack tracing under VM
-----------------------
-A basic backtrace
------------------
-
-Here are the tricks I use 9 out of 10 times it works pretty well,
-
-When your backchain reaches a dead end
---------------------------------------
-This can happen when an exception happens in the kernel and the kernel is
-entered twice. If you reach the NULL pointer at the end of the back chain you
-should be able to sniff further back if you follow the following tricks.
-1) A kernel address should be easy to recognise since it is in
-primary space & the problem state bit isn't set & also
-The Hi bit of the address is set.
-2) Another backchain should also be easy to recognise since it is an 
-address pointing to another address approximately 100 bytes or 0x70 hex
-behind the current stackpointer.
-
-
-Here is some practice.
-boot the kernel & hit PA1 at some random time
-d g to display the gprs, this should display something like
-GPR  0 =  00000001  00156018  0014359C  00000000
-GPR  4 =  00000001  001B8888  000003E0  00000000
-GPR  8 =  00100080  00100084  00000000  000FE000
-GPR 12 =  00010400  8001B2DC  8001B36A  000FFED8
-Note that GPR14 is a return address but as we are real men we are going to
-trace the stack.
-display 0x40 bytes after the stack pointer.
-
-V000FFED8  000FFF38 8001B838 80014C8E 000FFF38
-V000FFEE8  00000000 00000000 000003E0 00000000
-V000FFEF8  00100080 00100084 00000000 000FE000
-V000FFF08  00010400 8001B2DC 8001B36A 000FFED8
-
-
-Ah now look at whats in sp+56 (sp+0x38) this is 8001B36A our saved r14 if
-you look above at our stackframe & also agrees with GPR14.
-
-now backchain 
-d 000FFF38.40
-we now are taking the contents of SP to get our first backchain.
-
-V000FFF38  000FFFA0 00000000 00014995 00147094
-V000FFF48  00147090 001470A0 000003E0 00000000
-V000FFF58  00100080 00100084 00000000 001BF1D0
-V000FFF68  00010400 800149BA 80014CA6 000FFF38
-
-This displays a 2nd return address of 80014CA6
-
-now do d 000FFFA0.40 for our 3rd backchain
-
-V000FFFA0  04B52002 0001107F 00000000 00000000
-V000FFFB0  00000000 00000000 FF000000 0001107F
-V000FFFC0  00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
-V000FFFD0  00010400 80010802 8001085A 000FFFA0
-
-
-our 3rd return address is 8001085A
-
-as the 04B52002 looks suspiciously like rubbish it is fair to assume that the
-kernel entry routines for the sake of optimisation don't set up a backchain.
-
-now look at System.map to see if the addresses make any sense.
-
-grep -i 0001b3 System.map
-outputs among other things
-0001b304 T cpu_idle 
-so 8001B36A
-is cpu_idle+0x66 ( quiet the cpu is asleep, don't wake it )
-
-
-grep -i 00014 System.map 
-produces among other things
-00014a78 T start_kernel  
-so 0014CA6 is start_kernel+some hex number I can't add in my head.
-
-grep -i 00108 System.map 
-this produces
-00010800 T _stext
-so   8001085A is _stext+0x5a
-
-Congrats you've done your first backchain.
-
-
-
-s/390 & z/Architecture IO Overview
-==================================
-
-I am not going to give a course in 390 IO architecture as this would take me
-quite a while and I'm no expert. Instead I'll give a 390 IO architecture
-summary for Dummies. If you have the s/390 principles of operation available
-read this instead. If nothing else you may find a few useful keywords in here
-and be able to use them on a web search engine to find more useful information.
-
-Unlike other bus architectures modern 390 systems do their IO using mostly
-fibre optics and devices such as tapes and disks can be shared between several
-mainframes. Also S390 can support up to 65536 devices while a high end PC based
-system might be choking with around 64.
-
-Here is some of the common IO terminology:
-
-Subchannel:
-This is the logical number most IO commands use to talk to an IO device. There
-can be up to 0x10000 (65536) of these in a configuration, typically there are a
-few hundred. Under VM for simplicity they are allocated contiguously, however
-on the native hardware they are not. They typically stay consistent between
-boots provided no new hardware is inserted or removed.
-Under Linux for s390 we use these as IRQ's and also when issuing an IO command
-(CLEAR SUBCHANNEL, HALT SUBCHANNEL, MODIFY SUBCHANNEL, RESUME SUBCHANNEL,
-START SUBCHANNEL, STORE SUBCHANNEL and TEST SUBCHANNEL). We use this as the ID
-of the device we wish to talk to. The most important of these instructions are
-START SUBCHANNEL (to start IO), TEST SUBCHANNEL (to check whether the IO
-completed successfully) and HALT SUBCHANNEL (to kill IO). A subchannel can have
-up to 8 channel paths to a device, this offers redundancy if one is not
-available.
-
-Device Number:
-This number remains static and is closely tied to the hardware. There are 65536
-of these, made up of a CHPID (Channel Path ID, the most significant 8 bits) and
-another lsb 8 bits. These remain static even if more devices are inserted or
-removed from the hardware. There is a 1 to 1 mapping between subchannels and
-device numbers, provided devices aren't inserted or removed.
-
-Channel Control Words:
-CCWs are linked lists of instructions initially pointed to by an operation
-request block (ORB), which is initially given to Start Subchannel (SSCH)
-command along with the subchannel number for the IO subsystem to process
-while the CPU continues executing normal code.
-CCWs come in two flavours, Format 0 (24 bit for backward compatibility) and
-Format 1 (31 bit). These are typically used to issue read and write (and many
-other) instructions. They consist of a length field and an absolute address
-field.
-Each IO typically gets 1 or 2 interrupts, one for channel end (primary status)
-when the channel is idle, and the second for device end (secondary status).
-Sometimes you get both concurrently. You check how the IO went on by issuing a
-TEST SUBCHANNEL at each interrupt, from which you receive an Interruption
-response block (IRB). If you get channel and device end status in the IRB
-without channel checks etc. your IO probably went okay. If you didn't you
-probably need to examine the IRB, extended status word etc.
-If an error occurs, more sophisticated control units have a facility known as
-concurrent sense. This means that if an error occurs Extended sense information
-will be presented in the Extended status word in the IRB. If not you have to
-issue a subsequent SENSE CCW command after the test subchannel.
-
-
-TPI (Test pending interrupt) can also be used for polled IO, but in
-multitasking multiprocessor systems it isn't recommended except for
-checking special cases (i.e. non looping checks for pending IO etc.).
-
-Store Subchannel and Modify Subchannel can be used to examine and modify
-operating characteristics of a subchannel (e.g. channel paths).
-
-Other IO related Terms:
-Sysplex: S390's Clustering Technology
-QDIO: S390's new high speed IO architecture to support devices such as gigabit
-ethernet, this architecture is also designed to be forward compatible with
-upcoming 64 bit machines.
-
-
-General Concepts 
-
-Input Output Processors (IOP's) are responsible for communicating between
-the mainframe CPU's & the channel & relieve the mainframe CPU's from the
-burden of communicating with IO devices directly, this allows the CPU's to 
-concentrate on data processing. 
-
-IOP's can use one or more links ( known as channel paths ) to talk to each 
-IO device. It first checks for path availability & chooses an available one,
-then starts ( & sometimes terminates IO ).
-There are two types of channel path: ESCON & the Parallel IO interface.
-
-IO devices are attached to control units, control units provide the
-logic to interface the channel paths & channel path IO protocols to 
-the IO devices, they can be integrated with the devices or housed separately
-& often talk to several similar devices ( typical examples would be raid 
-controllers or a control unit which connects to 1000 3270 terminals ).
-
-
-    +---------------------------------------------------------------+
-    | +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+  +----------+  +----------+   |
-    | | CPU | | CPU | | CPU | | CPU |  |  Main    |  | Expanded |   |
-    | |     | |     | |     | |     |  |  Memory  |  |  Storage |   |
-    | +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+  +----------+  +----------+   | 
-    |---------------------------------------------------------------+
-    |   IOP        |      IOP      |       IOP                      |
-    |---------------------------------------------------------------
-    | C | C | C | C | C | C | C | C | C | C | C | C | C | C | C | C | 
-    ----------------------------------------------------------------
-         ||                                              ||
-         ||  Bus & Tag Channel Path                      || ESCON
-         ||  ======================                      || Channel
-         ||  ||                  ||                      || Path
-    +----------+               +----------+         +----------+
-    |          |               |          |         |          |
-    |    CU    |               |    CU    |         |    CU    |
-    |          |               |          |         |          |
-    +----------+               +----------+         +----------+
-       |      |                     |                |       |
-+----------+ +----------+      +----------+   +----------+ +----------+
-|I/O Device| |I/O Device|      |I/O Device|   |I/O Device| |I/O Device|
-+----------+ +----------+      +----------+   +----------+ +----------+
-  CPU = Central Processing Unit    
-  C = Channel                      
-  IOP = IP Processor               
-  CU = Control Unit
-
-The 390 IO systems come in 2 flavours the current 390 machines support both
-
-The Older 360 & 370 Interface,sometimes called the Parallel I/O interface,
-sometimes called Bus-and Tag & sometimes Original Equipment Manufacturers
-Interface (OEMI).
-
-This byte wide Parallel channel path/bus has parity & data on the "Bus" cable 
-and control lines on the "Tag" cable. These can operate in byte multiplex mode
-for sharing between several slow devices or burst mode and monopolize the
-channel for the whole burst. Up to 256 devices can be addressed on one of these
-cables. These cables are about one inch in diameter. The maximum unextended
-length supported by these cables is 125 Meters but this can be extended up to
-2km with a fibre optic channel extended such as a 3044. The maximum burst speed
-supported is 4.5 megabytes per second. However, some really old processors
-support only transfer rates of 3.0, 2.0 & 1.0 MB/sec.
-One of these paths can be daisy chained to up to 8 control units.
-
-
-ESCON if fibre optic it is also called FICON 
-Was introduced by IBM in 1990. Has 2 fibre optic cables and uses either leds or
-lasers for communication at a signaling rate of up to 200 megabits/sec. As
-10bits are transferred for every 8 bits info this drops to 160 megabits/sec
-and to 18.6 Megabytes/sec once control info and CRC are added. ESCON only
-operates in burst mode.
-ESCONs typical max cable length is 3km for the led version and 20km for the
-laser version known as XDF (extended distance facility). This can be further
-extended by using an ESCON director which triples the above mentioned ranges.
-Unlike Bus & Tag as ESCON is serial it uses a packet switching architecture,
-the standard Bus & Tag control protocol is however present within the packets.
-Up to 256 devices can be attached to each control unit that uses one of these
-interfaces.
-
-Common 390 Devices include:
-Network adapters typically OSA2,3172's,2116's & OSA-E gigabit ethernet adapters,
-Consoles 3270 & 3215 (a teletype emulated under linux for a line mode console).
-DASD's direct access storage devices ( otherwise known as hard disks ).
-Tape Drives.
-CTC ( Channel to Channel Adapters ),
-ESCON or Parallel Cables used as a very high speed serial link
-between 2 machines.
-
-
-Debugging IO on s/390 & z/Architecture under VM
-===============================================
-
-Now we are ready to go on with IO tracing commands under VM
-
-A few self explanatory queries:
-Q OSA
-Q CTC
-Q DISK ( This command is CMS specific )
-Q DASD
-
-
-
-
-
-
-Q OSA on my machine returns
-OSA  7C08 ON OSA   7C08 SUBCHANNEL = 0000
-OSA  7C09 ON OSA   7C09 SUBCHANNEL = 0001
-OSA  7C14 ON OSA   7C14 SUBCHANNEL = 0002
-OSA  7C15 ON OSA   7C15 SUBCHANNEL = 0003
-
-If you have a guest with certain privileges you may be able to see devices
-which don't belong to you. To avoid this, add the option V.
-e.g.
-Q V OSA
-
-Now using the device numbers returned by this command we will
-Trace the io starting up on the first device 7c08 & 7c09
-In our simplest case we can trace the 
-start subchannels
-like TR SSCH 7C08-7C09
-or the halt subchannels
-or TR HSCH 7C08-7C09
-MSCH's ,STSCH's I think you can guess the rest
-
-A good trick is tracing all the IO's and CCWS and spooling them into the reader
-of another VM guest so he can ftp the logfile back to his own machine. I'll do
-a small bit of this and give you a look at the output.
-
-1) Spool stdout to VM reader
-SP PRT TO (another vm guest ) or * for the local vm guest
-2) Fill the reader with the trace
-TR IO 7c08-7c09 INST INT CCW PRT RUN
-3) Start up linux 
-i 00c  
-4) Finish the trace
-TR END
-5) close the reader
-C PRT
-6) list reader contents
-RDRLIST
-7) copy it to linux4's minidisk 
-RECEIVE / LOG TXT A1 ( replace
-8)
-filel & press F11 to look at it
-You should see something like:
-
-00020942' SSCH  B2334000    0048813C    CC 0    SCH 0000    DEV 7C08
-          CPA 000FFDF0   PARM 00E2C9C4    KEY 0  FPI C0  LPM 80
-          CCW    000FFDF0  E4200100 00487FE8   0000  E4240100 ........
-          IDAL                                      43D8AFE8
-          IDAL                                      0FB76000
-00020B0A'   I/O DEV 7C08 -> 000197BC'   SCH 0000   PARM 00E2C9C4
-00021628' TSCH  B2354000 >> 00488164    CC 0    SCH 0000    DEV 7C08
-          CCWA 000FFDF8   DEV STS 0C  SCH STS 00  CNT 00EC
-           KEY 0   FPI C0  CC 0   CTLS 4007
-00022238' STSCH B2344000 >> 00488108    CC 0    SCH 0000    DEV 7C08
-
-If you don't like messing up your readed ( because you possibly booted from it )
-you can alternatively spool it to another readers guest.
-
-
-Other common VM device related commands
----------------------------------------------
-These commands are listed only because they have
-been of use to me in the past & may be of use to
-you too. For more complete info on each of the commands
-use type HELP <command> from CMS.
-detaching devices
-DET <devno range>
-ATT <devno range> <guest> 
-attach a device to guest * for your own guest
-READY <devno> cause VM to issue a fake interrupt.
-
-The VARY command is normally only available to VM administrators.
-VARY ON PATH <path> TO <devno range>
-VARY OFF PATH <PATH> FROM <devno range>
-This is used to switch on or off channel paths to devices.
-
-Q CHPID <channel path ID>
-This displays state of devices using this channel path
-D SCHIB <subchannel>
-This displays the subchannel information SCHIB block for the device.
-this I believe is also only available to administrators.
-DEFINE CTC <devno>
-defines a virtual CTC channel to channel connection
-2 need to be defined on each guest for the CTC driver to use.
-COUPLE  devno userid remote devno
-Joins a local virtual device to a remote virtual device
-( commonly used for the CTC driver ).
-
-Building a VM ramdisk under CMS which linux can use
-def vfb-<blocksize> <subchannel> <number blocks>
-blocksize is commonly 4096 for linux.
-Formatting it
-format <subchannel> <driver letter e.g. x> (blksize <blocksize>
-
-Sharing a disk between multiple guests
-LINK userid devno1 devno2 mode password
-
-
-
-GDB on S390
-===========
-N.B. if compiling for debugging gdb works better without optimisation 
-( see Compiling programs for debugging )
-
-invocation
-----------
-gdb <victim program> <optional corefile>
-
-Online help
------------
-help: gives help on commands
-e.g.
-help
-help display
-Note gdb's online help is very good use it.
-
-
-Assembly
---------
-info registers: displays registers other than floating point.
-info all-registers: displays floating points as well.
-disassemble: disassembles
-e.g.
-disassemble without parameters will disassemble the current function
-disassemble $pc $pc+10 
-
-Viewing & modifying variables
------------------------------
-print or p: displays variable or register
-e.g. p/x $sp will display the stack pointer
-
-display: prints variable or register each time program stops