muen/linux.git
3 years agoarm64: turn flush_dcache_mmap_lock into a no-op
Matthew Wilcox [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:36:36 +0000 (16:36 -0700)]
arm64: turn flush_dcache_mmap_lock into a no-op

ARM64 doesn't walk the VMA tree in its flush_dcache_page()
implementation, so has no need to take the tree_lock.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180313132639.17387-4-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <mawilcox@microsoft.com>
Reviewed-by: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Darrick J. Wong <darrick.wong@oracle.com>
Cc: Dave Chinner <david@fromorbit.com>
Cc: Jeff Layton <jlayton@kernel.org>
Cc: Ryusuke Konishi <konishi.ryusuke@lab.ntt.co.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomac80211_hwsim: use DEFINE_IDA
Matthew Wilcox [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:36:33 +0000 (16:36 -0700)]
mac80211_hwsim: use DEFINE_IDA

This is preferred to opencoding an IDA_INIT.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180313132639.17387-2-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <mawilcox@microsoft.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoradix tree: use GFP_ZONEMASK bits of gfp_t for flags
Matthew Wilcox [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:36:28 +0000 (16:36 -0700)]
radix tree: use GFP_ZONEMASK bits of gfp_t for flags

Patch series "XArray", v9.  (First part thereof).

This patchset is, I believe, appropriate for merging for 4.17.  It
contains the XArray implementation, to eventually replace the radix
tree, and converts the page cache to use it.

This conversion keeps the radix tree and XArray data structures in sync
at all times.  That allows us to convert the page cache one function at
a time and should allow for easier bisection.  Other than renaming some
elements of the structures, the data structures are fundamentally
unchanged; a radix tree walk and an XArray walk will touch the same
number of cachelines.  I have changes planned to the XArray data
structure, but those will happen in future patches.

Improvements the XArray has over the radix tree:

 - The radix tree provides operations like other trees do; 'insert' and
   'delete'. But what most users really want is an automatically
   resizing array, and so it makes more sense to give users an API that
   is like an array -- 'load' and 'store'. We still have an 'insert'
   operation for users that really want that semantic.

 - The XArray considers locking as part of its API. This simplifies a
   lot of users who formerly had to manage their own locking just for
   the radix tree. It also improves code generation as we can now tell
   RCU that we're holding a lock and it doesn't need to generate as much
   fencing code. The other advantage is that tree nodes can be moved
   (not yet implemented).

 - GFP flags are now parameters to calls which may need to allocate
   memory. The radix tree forced users to decide what the allocation
   flags would be at creation time. It's much clearer to specify them at
   allocation time.

 - Memory is not preloaded; we don't tie up dozens of pages on the off
   chance that the slab allocator fails. Instead, we drop the lock,
   allocate a new node and retry the operation. We have to convert all
   the radix tree, IDA and IDR preload users before we can realise this
   benefit, but I have not yet found a user which cannot be converted.

 - The XArray provides a cmpxchg operation. The radix tree forces users
   to roll their own (and at least four have).

 - Iterators take a 'max' parameter. That simplifies many users and will
   reduce the amount of iteration done.

 - Iteration can proceed backwards. We only have one user for this, but
   since it's called as part of the pagefault readahead algorithm, that
   seemed worth mentioning.

 - RCU-protected pointers are not exposed as part of the API. There are
   some fun bugs where the page cache forgets to use rcu_dereference()
   in the current codebase.

 - Value entries gain an extra bit compared to radix tree exceptional
   entries. That gives us the extra bit we need to put huge page swap
   entries in the page cache.

 - Some iterators now take a 'filter' argument instead of having
   separate iterators for tagged/untagged iterations.

The page cache is improved by this:

 - Shorter, easier to read code

 - More efficient iterations

 - Reduction in size of struct address_space

 - Fewer walks from the top of the data structure; the XArray API
   encourages staying at the leaf node and conducting operations there.

This patch (of 8):

None of these bits may be used for slab allocations, so we can use them
as radix tree flags as long as we mask them off before passing them to
the slab allocator. Move the IDR flag from the high bits to the
GFP_ZONEMASK bits.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180313132639.17387-3-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <mawilcox@microsoft.com>
Acked-by: Jeff Layton <jlayton@kernel.org>
Cc: Darrick J. Wong <darrick.wong@oracle.com>
Cc: Dave Chinner <david@fromorbit.com>
Cc: Ryusuke Konishi <konishi.ryusuke@lab.ntt.co.jp>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agolinux/const.h: refactor _BITUL and _BITULL a bit
Masahiro Yamada [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:36:24 +0000 (16:36 -0700)]
linux/const.h: refactor _BITUL and _BITULL a bit

Minor cleanups available by _UL and _ULL.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519301715-31798-5-git-send-email-yamada.masahiro@socionext.com
Signed-off-by: Masahiro Yamada <yamada.masahiro@socionext.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@mprc.pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Russell King <rmk+kernel@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agolinux/const.h: move UL() macro to include/linux/const.h
Masahiro Yamada [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:36:19 +0000 (16:36 -0700)]
linux/const.h: move UL() macro to include/linux/const.h

ARM, ARM64 and UniCore32 duplicate the definition of UL():

  #define UL(x) _AC(x, UL)

This is not actually arch-specific, so it will be useful to move it to a
common header.  Currently, we only have the uapi variant for
linux/const.h, so I am creating include/linux/const.h.

I also added _UL(), _ULL() and ULL() because _AC() is mostly used in
the form either _AC(..., UL) or _AC(..., ULL).  I expect they will be
replaced in follow-up cleanups.  The underscore-prefixed ones should
be used for exported headers.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519301715-31798-4-git-send-email-yamada.masahiro@socionext.com
Signed-off-by: Masahiro Yamada <yamada.masahiro@socionext.com>
Acked-by: Guan Xuetao <gxt@mprc.pku.edu.cn>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Acked-by: Russell King <rmk+kernel@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agolinux/const.h: prefix include guard of uapi/linux/const.h with _UAPI
Masahiro Yamada [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:36:15 +0000 (16:36 -0700)]
linux/const.h: prefix include guard of uapi/linux/const.h with _UAPI

Patch series "linux/const.h: cleanups of macros such as UL(), _BITUL(),
BIT() etc", v3.

ARM, ARM64, UniCore32 define UL() as a shorthand of _AC(..., UL).  More
architectures may introduce it in the future.

UL() is arch-agnostic, and useful. So let's move it to
include/linux/const.h

Currently, <asm/memory.h> must be included to use UL().  It pulls in more
bloats just for defining some bit macros.

I posted V2 one year ago.

The previous posts are:
https://patchwork.kernel.org/patch/9498273/
https://patchwork.kernel.org/patch/9498275/
https://patchwork.kernel.org/patch/9498269/
https://patchwork.kernel.org/patch/9498271/

At that time, what blocked this series was a comment from
David Howells:
  You need to be very careful doing this.  Some userspace stuff
  depends on the guard macro names on the kernel header files.

(https://patchwork.kernel.org/patch/9498275/)

Looking at the code closer, I noticed this is not a problem.

See the following line.
https://github.com/torvalds/linux/blob/v4.16-rc2/scripts/headers_install.sh#L40

scripts/headers_install.sh rips off _UAPI prefix from guard macro names.

I ran "make headers_install" and confirmed the result is what I expect.

So, we can prefix the include guard of include/uapi/linux/const.h,
and add a new include/linux/const.h.

This patch (of 4):

I am going to add include/linux/const.h for the kernel space.

Add _UAPI to the include guard of include/uapi/linux/const.h to
prepare for that.

Please notice the guard name of the exported one will be kept as-is.
So, this commit has no impact to the userspace even if some userspace
stuff depends on the guard macro names.

scripts/headers_install.sh processes exported headers by SED, and
rips off "_UAPI" from guard macro names.

  #ifndef _UAPI_LINUX_CONST_H
  #define _UAPI_LINUX_CONST_H

will be turned into

  #ifndef _LINUX_CONST_H
  #define _LINUX_CONST_H

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519301715-31798-2-git-send-email-yamada.masahiro@socionext.com
Signed-off-by: Masahiro Yamada <yamada.masahiro@socionext.com>
Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@mprc.pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Russell King <rmk+kernel@armlinux.org.uk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoxen, mm: allow deferred page initialization for xen pv domains
Pavel Tatashin [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:36:10 +0000 (16:36 -0700)]
xen, mm: allow deferred page initialization for xen pv domains

Juergen Gross noticed that commit f7f99100d8d ("mm: stop zeroing memory
during allocation in vmemmap") broke XEN PV domains when deferred struct
page initialization is enabled.

This is because the xen's PagePinned() flag is getting erased from
struct pages when they are initialized later in boot.

Juergen fixed this problem by disabling deferred pages on xen pv
domains.  It is desirable, however, to have this feature available as it
reduces boot time.  This fix re-enables the feature for pv-dmains, and
fixes the problem the following way:

The fix is to delay setting PagePinned flag until struct pages for all
allocated memory are initialized, i.e.  until after free_all_bootmem().

A new x86_init.hyper op init_after_bootmem() is called to let xen know
that boot allocator is done, and hence struct pages for all the
allocated memory are now initialized.  If deferred page initialization
is enabled, the rest of struct pages are going to be initialized later
in boot once page_alloc_init_late() is called.

xen_after_bootmem() walks page table's pages and marks them pinned.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180226160112.24724-2-pasha.tatashin@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@oracle.com>
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Reviewed-by: Juergen Gross <jgross@suse.com>
Tested-by: Juergen Gross <jgross@suse.com>
Cc: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@oracle.com>
Cc: Alok Kataria <akataria@vmware.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Boris Ostrovsky <boris.ostrovsky@oracle.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@suse.de>
Cc: Mathias Krause <minipli@googlemail.com>
Cc: Jinbum Park <jinb.park7@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Cc: Jia Zhang <zhang.jia@linux.alibaba.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Stefano Stabellini <sstabellini@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoelf: enforce MAP_FIXED on overlaying elf segments
Michal Hocko [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:36:05 +0000 (16:36 -0700)]
elf: enforce MAP_FIXED on overlaying elf segments

Anshuman has reported that with "fs, elf: drop MAP_FIXED usage from
elf_map" applied, some ELF binaries in his environment fail to start
with

 [   23.423642] 9148 (sed): Uhuuh, elf segment at 0000000010030000 requested but the memory is mapped already
 [   23.423706] requested [1003000010040000] mapped [1003000010040000] 100073 anon

The reason is that the above binary has overlapping elf segments:

  LOAD           0x0000000000000000 0x0000000010000000 0x0000000010000000
                 0x0000000000013a8c 0x0000000000013a8c  R E    10000
  LOAD           0x000000000001fd40 0x000000001002fd40 0x000000001002fd40
                 0x00000000000002c0 0x00000000000005e8  RW     10000
  LOAD           0x0000000000020328 0x0000000010030328 0x0000000010030328
                 0x0000000000000384 0x00000000000094a0  RW     10000

That binary has two RW LOAD segments, the first crosses a page border
into the second

  0x1002fd40 (LOAD2-vaddr) + 0x5e8 (LOAD2-memlen) == 0x10030328 (LOAD3-vaddr)

Handle this situation by enforcing MAP_FIXED when we establish a
temporary brk VMA to handle overlapping segments.  All other mappings
will still use MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180213100440.GM3443@dhcp22.suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reported-by: Anshuman Khandual <khandual@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Khalid Aziz <khalid.aziz@oracle.com>
Cc: Andrei Vagin <avagin@openvz.org>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Abdul Haleem <abdhalee@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Joel Stanley <joel@jms.id.au>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Mark Brown <broonie@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agofs, elf: drop MAP_FIXED usage from elf_map
Michal Hocko [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:36:01 +0000 (16:36 -0700)]
fs, elf: drop MAP_FIXED usage from elf_map

Both load_elf_interp and load_elf_binary rely on elf_map to map segments
on a controlled address and they use MAP_FIXED to enforce that.  This is
however dangerous thing prone to silent data corruption which can be
even exploitable.

Let's take CVE-2017-1000253 as an example.  At the time (before commit
eab09532d400: "binfmt_elf: use ELF_ET_DYN_BASE only for PIE")
ELF_ET_DYN_BASE was at TASK_SIZE / 3 * 2 which is not that far away from
the stack top on 32b (legacy) memory layout (only 1GB away).  Therefore
we could end up mapping over the existing stack with some luck.

The issue has been fixed since then (a87938b2e246: "fs/binfmt_elf.c: fix
bug in loading of PIE binaries"), ELF_ET_DYN_BASE moved moved much
further from the stack (eab09532d400 and later by c715b72c1ba4: "mm:
revert x86_64 and arm64 ELF_ET_DYN_BASE base changes") and excessive
stack consumption early during execve fully stopped by da029c11e6b1
("exec: Limit arg stack to at most 75% of _STK_LIM").  So we should be
safe and any attack should be impractical.  On the other hand this is
just too subtle assumption so it can break quite easily and hard to
spot.

I believe that the MAP_FIXED usage in load_elf_binary (et. al) is still
fundamentally dangerous.  Moreover it shouldn't be even needed.  We are
at the early process stage and so there shouldn't be unrelated mappings
(except for stack and loader) existing so mmap for a given address should
succeed even without MAP_FIXED.  Something is terribly wrong if this is
not the case and we should rather fail than silently corrupt the
underlying mapping.

Address this issue by changing MAP_FIXED to the newly added
MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE.  This will mean that mmap will fail if there is an
existing mapping clashing with the requested one without clobbering it.

[mhocko@suse.com: fix build]
[akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes]
[avagin@openvz.org: don't use the same value for MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE and MAP_SYNC]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20171218184916.24445-1-avagin@openvz.org
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20171213092550.2774-3-mhocko@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrei Vagin <avagin@openvz.org>
Signed-off-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Khalid Aziz <khalid.aziz@oracle.com>
Acked-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Acked-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Abdul Haleem <abdhalee@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Joel Stanley <joel@jms.id.au>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <khandual@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomm: introduce MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE
Michal Hocko [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:57 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
mm: introduce MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE

Patch series "mm: introduce MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE", v2.

This has started as a follow up discussion [3][4] resulting in the
runtime failure caused by hardening patch [5] which removes MAP_FIXED
from the elf loader because MAP_FIXED is inherently dangerous as it
might silently clobber an existing underlying mapping (e.g.  stack).
The reason for the failure is that some architectures enforce an
alignment for the given address hint without MAP_FIXED used (e.g.  for
shared or file backed mappings).

One way around this would be excluding those archs which do alignment
tricks from the hardening [6].  The patch is really trivial but it has
been objected, rightfully so, that this screams for a more generic
solution.  We basically want a non-destructive MAP_FIXED.

The first patch introduced MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE which enforces the given
address but unlike MAP_FIXED it fails with EEXIST if the given range
conflicts with an existing one.  The flag is introduced as a completely
new one rather than a MAP_FIXED extension because of the backward
compatibility.  We really want a never-clobber semantic even on older
kernels which do not recognize the flag.  Unfortunately mmap sucks
wrt flags evaluation because we do not EINVAL on unknown flags.  On
those kernels we would simply use the traditional hint based semantic so
the caller can still get a different address (which sucks) but at least
not silently corrupt an existing mapping.  I do not see a good way
around that.  Except we won't export expose the new semantic to the
userspace at all.

It seems there are users who would like to have something like that.
Jemalloc has been mentioned by Michael Ellerman [7]

Florian Weimer has mentioned the following:
: glibc ld.so currently maps DSOs without hints.  This means that the kernel
: will map right next to each other, and the offsets between them a completely
: predictable.  We would like to change that and supply a random address in a
: window of the address space.  If there is a conflict, we do not want the
: kernel to pick a non-random address. Instead, we would try again with a
: random address.

John Hubbard has mentioned CUDA example
: a) Searches /proc/<pid>/maps for a "suitable" region of available
: VA space.  "Suitable" generally means it has to have a base address
: within a certain limited range (a particular device model might
: have odd limitations, for example), it has to be large enough, and
: alignment has to be large enough (again, various devices may have
: constraints that lead us to do this).
:
: This is of course subject to races with other threads in the process.
:
: Let's say it finds a region starting at va.
:
: b) Next it does:
:     p = mmap(va, ...)
:
: *without* setting MAP_FIXED, of course (so va is just a hint), to
: attempt to safely reserve that region. If p != va, then in most cases,
: this is a failure (almost certainly due to another thread getting a
: mapping from that region before we did), and so this layer now has to
: call munmap(), before returning a "failure: retry" to upper layers.
:
:     IMPROVEMENT: --> if instead, we could call this:
:
:             p = mmap(va, ... MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE ...)
:
:         , then we could skip the munmap() call upon failure. This
:         is a small thing, but it is useful here. (Thanks to Piotr
:         Jaroszynski and Mark Hairgrove for helping me get that detail
:         exactly right, btw.)
:
: c) After that, CUDA suballocates from p, via:
:
:      q = mmap(sub_region_start, ... MAP_FIXED ...)
:
: Interestingly enough, "freeing" is also done via MAP_FIXED, and
: setting PROT_NONE to the subregion. Anyway, I just included (c) for
: general interest.

Atomic address range probing in the multithreaded programs in general
sounds like an interesting thing to me.

The second patch simply replaces MAP_FIXED use in elf loader by
MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE.  I believe other places which rely on MAP_FIXED
should follow.  Actually real MAP_FIXED usages should be docummented
properly and they should be more of an exception.

[1] http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20171116101900.13621-1-mhocko@kernel.org
[2] http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20171129144219.22867-1-mhocko@kernel.org
[3] http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20171107162217.382cd754@canb.auug.org.au
[4] http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1510048229.12079.7.camel@abdul.in.ibm.com
[5] http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20171023082608.6167-1-mhocko@kernel.org
[6] http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20171113094203.aofz2e7kueitk55y@dhcp22.suse.cz
[7] http://lkml.kernel.org/r/87efp1w7vy.fsf@concordia.ellerman.id.au

This patch (of 2):

MAP_FIXED is used quite often to enforce mapping at the particular range.
The main problem of this flag is, however, that it is inherently dangerous
because it unmaps existing mappings covered by the requested range.  This
can cause silent memory corruptions.  Some of them even with serious
security implications.  While the current semantic might be really
desiderable in many cases there are others which would want to enforce the
given range but rather see a failure than a silent memory corruption on a
clashing range.  Please note that there is no guarantee that a given range
is obeyed by the mmap even when it is free - e.g.  arch specific code is
allowed to apply an alignment.

Introduce a new MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE flag for mmap to achieve this
behavior.  It has the same semantic as MAP_FIXED wrt.  the given address
request with a single exception that it fails with EEXIST if the requested
address is already covered by an existing mapping.  We still do rely on
get_unmaped_area to handle all the arch specific MAP_FIXED treatment and
check for a conflicting vma after it returns.

The flag is introduced as a completely new one rather than a MAP_FIXED
extension because of the backward compatibility.  We really want a
never-clobber semantic even on older kernels which do not recognize the
flag.  Unfortunately mmap sucks wrt.  flags evaluation because we do not
EINVAL on unknown flags.  On those kernels we would simply use the
traditional hint based semantic so the caller can still get a different
address (which sucks) but at least not silently corrupt an existing
mapping.  I do not see a good way around that.

[mpe@ellerman.id.au: fix whitespace]
[fail on clashing range with EEXIST as per Florian Weimer]
[set MAP_FIXED before round_hint_to_min as per Khalid Aziz]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20171213092550.2774-2-mhocko@kernel.org
Reviewed-by: Khalid Aziz <khalid.aziz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Khalid Aziz <khalid.aziz@oracle.com>
Cc: Russell King - ARM Linux <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Florian Weimer <fweimer@redhat.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Abdul Haleem <abdhalee@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Joel Stanley <joel@jms.id.au>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Jason Evans <jasone@google.com>
Cc: David Goldblatt <davidtgoldblatt@gmail.com>
Cc: Edward Tomasz NapieraƂa <trasz@FreeBSD.org>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <khandual@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoMAINTAINERS: update bouncing aacraid@adaptec.com addresses
Joe Perches [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:53 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
MAINTAINERS: update bouncing aacraid@adaptec.com addresses

Adaptec is now part of Microsemi.

Commit 2a81ffdd9da1 ("MAINTAINERS: Update email address for aacraid")
updated only one of the driver maintainer addresses.

Update the other two sections as the aacraid@adaptec.com address
bounces.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1522103936.12357.27.camel@perches.com
Signed-off-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Dave Carroll <david.carroll@microsemi.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agofs/dcache.c: add cond_resched() in shrink_dentry_list()
Nikolay Borisov [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:49 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
fs/dcache.c: add cond_resched() in shrink_dentry_list()

As previously reported (https://patchwork.kernel.org/patch/8642031/)
it's possible to call shrink_dentry_list with a large number of dentries
(> 10000).  This, in turn, could trigger the softlockup detector and
possibly trigger a panic.  In addition to the unmount path being
vulnerable to this scenario, at SuSE we've observed similar situation
happening during process exit on processes that touch a lot of dentries.
Here is an excerpt from a crash dump.  The number after the colon are
the number of dentries on the list passed to shrink_dentry_list:

PID 99760: 10722
PID 107530: 215
PID 108809: 24134
PID 108877: 21331
PID 141708: 16487

So we want to kill between 15k-25k dentries without yielding.

And one possible call stack looks like:

4 [ffff8839ece41db0] _raw_spin_lock at ffffffff8152a5f8
5 [ffff8839ece41db0] evict at ffffffff811c3026
6 [ffff8839ece41dd0] __dentry_kill at ffffffff811bf258
7 [ffff8839ece41df0] shrink_dentry_list at ffffffff811bf593
8 [ffff8839ece41e18] shrink_dcache_parent at ffffffff811bf830
9 [ffff8839ece41e50] proc_flush_task at ffffffff8120dd61
10 [ffff8839ece41ec0] release_task at ffffffff81059ebd
11 [ffff8839ece41f08] do_exit at ffffffff8105b8ce
12 [ffff8839ece41f78] sys_exit at ffffffff8105bd53
13 [ffff8839ece41f80] system_call_fastpath at ffffffff81532909

While some of the callers of shrink_dentry_list do use cond_resched,
this is not sufficient to prevent softlockups.  So just move
cond_resched into shrink_dentry_list from its callers.

David said: I've found hundreds of occurrences of warnings that we emit
when need_resched stays set for a prolonged period of time with the
stack trace that is included in the change log.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1521718946-31521-1-git-send-email-nborisov@suse.com
Signed-off-by: Nikolay Borisov <nborisov@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Goldwyn Rodrigues <rgoldwyn@suse.de>
Cc: Jeff Mahoney <jeffm@suse.com>
Cc: Davidlohr Bueso <dave@stgolabs.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoinclude/linux/kfifo.h: fix comment
Valentin Vidic [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:46 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
include/linux/kfifo.h: fix comment

Clean up unusual formatting in the note about locking.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180324002630.13046-1-Valentin.Vidic@CARNet.hr
Signed-off-by: Valentin Vidic <Valentin.Vidic@CARNet.hr>
Cc: Stefani Seibold <stefani@seibold.net>
Cc: Mauro Carvalho Chehab <mchehab@kernel.org>
Cc: Christophe JAILLET <christophe.jaillet@wanadoo.fr>
Cc: Jiri Kosina <jkosina@suse.cz>
Cc: Sean Young <sean@mess.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoipc/shm.c: shm_split(): remove unneeded test for NULL shm_file_data.vm_ops
Andrew Morton [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:42 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
ipc/shm.c: shm_split(): remove unneeded test for NULL shm_file_data.vm_ops

This was added by the recent "ipc/shm.c: add split function to
shm_vm_ops", but it is not necessary.

Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Davidlohr Bueso <dave@stgolabs.net>
Cc: Manfred Spraul <manfred@colorfullife.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agokernel/sysctl.c: add kdoc comments to do_proc_do{u}intvec_minmax_conv_param
Waiman Long [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:38 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
kernel/sysctl.c: add kdoc comments to do_proc_do{u}intvec_minmax_conv_param

Kdoc comments are added to the do_proc_dointvec_minmax_conv_param and
do_proc_douintvec_minmax_conv_param structures thare are used internally
for range checking.

The error codes returned by proc_dointvec_minmax() and
proc_douintvec_minmax() are also documented.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519926220-7453-3-git-send-email-longman@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Waiman Long <longman@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Luis R. Rodriguez <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Davidlohr Bueso <dave@stgolabs.net>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Manfred Spraul <manfred@colorfullife.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agofs/proc/proc_sysctl.c: fix typo in sysctl_check_table_array()
Waiman Long [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:35 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
fs/proc/proc_sysctl.c: fix typo in sysctl_check_table_array()

Patch series "ipc: Clamp *mni to the real IPCMNI limit", v3.

The sysctl parameters msgmni, shmmni and semmni have an inherent limit
of IPC_MNI (32k).  However, users may not be aware of that because they
can write a value much higher than that without getting any error or
notification.  Reading the parameters back will show the newly written
values which are not real.

Enforcing the limit by failing sysctl parameter write, however, can
break existing user applications.  To address this delemma, a new flags
field is introduced into the ctl_table.  The value CTL_FLAGS_CLAMP_RANGE
can be added to any ctl_table entries to enable a looser range clamping
without returning any error.  For example,

  .flags = CTL_FLAGS_CLAMP_RANGE,

This flags value are now used for the range checking of shmmni, msgmni
and semmni without breaking existing applications.  If any out of range
value is written to those sysctl parameters, the following warning will
be printed instead.

  Kernel parameter "shmmni" was set out of range [0, 32768], clamped to 32768.

Reading the values back will show 32768 instead of some fake values.

This patch (of 6):

Fix a typo.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519926220-7453-2-git-send-email-longman@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Waiman Long <longman@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Luis R. Rodriguez <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Cc: Davidlohr Bueso <dave@stgolabs.net>
Cc: Manfred Spraul <manfred@colorfullife.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoipc/msg: introduce msgctl(MSG_STAT_ANY)
Davidlohr Bueso [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:30 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
ipc/msg: introduce msgctl(MSG_STAT_ANY)

There is a permission discrepancy when consulting msq ipc object
metadata between /proc/sysvipc/msg (0444) and the MSG_STAT shmctl
command.  The later does permission checks for the object vs S_IRUGO.
As such there can be cases where EACCESS is returned via syscall but the
info is displayed anyways in the procfs files.

While this might have security implications via info leaking (albeit no
writing to the msq metadata), this behavior goes way back and showing
all the objects regardless of the permissions was most likely an
overlook - so we are stuck with it.  Furthermore, modifying either the
syscall or the procfs file can cause userspace programs to break (ie
ipcs).  Some applications require getting the procfs info (without root
privileges) and can be rather slow in comparison with a syscall -- up to
500x in some reported cases for shm.

This patch introduces a new MSG_STAT_ANY command such that the msq ipc
object permissions are ignored, and only audited instead.  In addition,
I've left the lsm security hook checks in place, as if some policy can
block the call, then the user has no other choice than just parsing the
procfs file.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180215162458.10059-4-dave@stgolabs.net
Signed-off-by: Davidlohr Bueso <dbueso@suse.de>
Reported-by: Robert Kettler <robert.kettler@outlook.com>
Cc: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Manfred Spraul <manfred@colorfullife.com>
Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoipc/sem: introduce semctl(SEM_STAT_ANY)
Davidlohr Bueso [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:26 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
ipc/sem: introduce semctl(SEM_STAT_ANY)

There is a permission discrepancy when consulting shm ipc object
metadata between /proc/sysvipc/sem (0444) and the SEM_STAT semctl
command.  The later does permission checks for the object vs S_IRUGO.
As such there can be cases where EACCESS is returned via syscall but the
info is displayed anyways in the procfs files.

While this might have security implications via info leaking (albeit no
writing to the sma metadata), this behavior goes way back and showing
all the objects regardless of the permissions was most likely an
overlook - so we are stuck with it.  Furthermore, modifying either the
syscall or the procfs file can cause userspace programs to break (ie
ipcs).  Some applications require getting the procfs info (without root
privileges) and can be rather slow in comparison with a syscall -- up to
500x in some reported cases for shm.

This patch introduces a new SEM_STAT_ANY command such that the sem ipc
object permissions are ignored, and only audited instead.  In addition,
I've left the lsm security hook checks in place, as if some policy can
block the call, then the user has no other choice than just parsing the
procfs file.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180215162458.10059-3-dave@stgolabs.net
Signed-off-by: Davidlohr Bueso <dbueso@suse.de>
Reported-by: Robert Kettler <robert.kettler@outlook.com>
Cc: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Manfred Spraul <manfred@colorfullife.com>
Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoipc/shm: introduce shmctl(SHM_STAT_ANY)
Davidlohr Bueso [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:23 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
ipc/shm: introduce shmctl(SHM_STAT_ANY)

Patch series "sysvipc: introduce STAT_ANY commands", v2.

The following patches adds the discussed (see [1]) new command for shm
as well as for sems and msq as they are subject to the same
discrepancies for ipc object permission checks between the syscall and
via procfs.  These new commands are justified in that (1) we are stuck
with this semantics as changing syscall and procfs can break userland;
and (2) some users can benefit from performance (for large amounts of
shm segments, for example) from not having to parse the procfs
interface.

Once merged, I will submit the necesary manpage updates.  But I'm thinking
something like:

: diff --git a/man2/shmctl.2 b/man2/shmctl.2
: index 7bb503999941..bb00bbe21a57 100644
: --- a/man2/shmctl.2
: +++ b/man2/shmctl.2
: @@ -41,6 +41,7 @@
:  .\" 2005-04-25, mtk -- noted aberrant Linux behavior w.r.t. new
:  .\" attaches to a segment that has already been marked for deletion.
:  .\" 2005-08-02, mtk: Added IPC_INFO, SHM_INFO, SHM_STAT descriptions.
: +.\" 2018-02-13, dbueso: Added SHM_STAT_ANY description.
:  .\"
:  .TH SHMCTL 2 2017-09-15 "Linux" "Linux Programmer's Manual"
:  .SH NAME
: @@ -242,6 +243,18 @@ However, the
:  argument is not a segment identifier, but instead an index into
:  the kernel's internal array that maintains information about
:  all shared memory segments on the system.
: +.TP
: +.BR SHM_STAT_ANY " (Linux-specific)"
: +Return a
: +.I shmid_ds
: +structure as for
: +.BR SHM_STAT .
: +However, the
: +.I shm_perm.mode
: +is not checked for read access for
: +.IR shmid ,
: +resembing the behaviour of
: +/proc/sysvipc/shm.
:  .PP
:  The caller can prevent or allow swapping of a shared
:  memory segment with the following \fIcmd\fP values:
: @@ -287,7 +300,7 @@ operation returns the index of the highest used entry in the
:  kernel's internal array recording information about all
:  shared memory segments.
:  (This information can be used with repeated
: -.B SHM_STAT
: +.B SHM_STAT/SHM_STAT_ANY
:  operations to obtain information about all shared memory segments
:  on the system.)
:  A successful
: @@ -328,7 +341,7 @@ isn't accessible.
:  \fIshmid\fP is not a valid identifier, or \fIcmd\fP
:  is not a valid command.
:  Or: for a
: -.B SHM_STAT
: +.B SHM_STAT/SHM_STAT_ANY
:  operation, the index value specified in
:  .I shmid
:  referred to an array slot that is currently unused.

This patch (of 3):

There is a permission discrepancy when consulting shm ipc object metadata
between /proc/sysvipc/shm (0444) and the SHM_STAT shmctl command.  The
later does permission checks for the object vs S_IRUGO.  As such there can
be cases where EACCESS is returned via syscall but the info is displayed
anyways in the procfs files.

While this might have security implications via info leaking (albeit no
writing to the shm metadata), this behavior goes way back and showing all
the objects regardless of the permissions was most likely an overlook - so
we are stuck with it.  Furthermore, modifying either the syscall or the
procfs file can cause userspace programs to break (ie ipcs).  Some
applications require getting the procfs info (without root privileges) and
can be rather slow in comparison with a syscall -- up to 500x in some
reported cases.

This patch introduces a new SHM_STAT_ANY command such that the shm ipc
object permissions are ignored, and only audited instead.  In addition,
I've left the lsm security hook checks in place, as if some policy can
block the call, then the user has no other choice than just parsing the
procfs file.

[1] https://lkml.org/lkml/2017/12/19/220

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180215162458.10059-2-dave@stgolabs.net
Signed-off-by: Davidlohr Bueso <dbueso@suse.de>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com>
Cc: Manfred Spraul <manfred@colorfullife.com>
Cc: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Robert Kettler <robert.kettler@outlook.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agokernel/params.c: downgrade warning for unsafe parameters
Chris Wilson [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:18 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
kernel/params.c: downgrade warning for unsafe parameters

As using an unsafe module parameter is, by its very definition, an
expected user action, emitting a warning is overkill.  Nothing has yet
gone wrong, and we add a taint flag for any future oops should something
actually go wrong.  So instead of having a user controllable pr_warn,
downgrade it to a pr_notice for "a normal, but significant condition".

We make use of unsafe kernel parameters in igt
(https://cgit.freedesktop.org/drm/igt-gpu-tools/) (we have not yet
succeeded in removing all such debugging options), which generates a
warning and taints the kernel.  The warning is unhelpful as we then need
to filter it out again as we check that every test themselves do not
provoke any kernel warnings.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180226151919.9674-1-chris@chris-wilson.co.uk
Fixes: 91f9d330cc14 ("module: make it possible to have unsafe, tainting module params")
Signed-off-by: Chris Wilson <chris@chris-wilson.co.uk>
Acked-by: Jani Nikula <jani.nikula@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au>
Cc: Jean Delvare <khali@linux-fr.org>
Cc: Li Zhong <zhong@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Petri Latvala <petri.latvala@intel.com>
Cc: Daniel Vetter <daniel.vetter@ffwll.ch>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agokernel/sysctl.c: fix sizeof argument to match variable name
Randy Dunlap [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:14 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
kernel/sysctl.c: fix sizeof argument to match variable name

Fix sizeof argument to be the same as the data variable name.  Probably
a copy/paste error.

Mostly harmless since both variables are unsigned int.

Fixes kernel bugzilla #197371:
  Possible access to unintended variable in "kernel/sysctl.c" line 1339
https://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=197371

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/e0d0531f-361e-ef5f-8499-32743ba907e1@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Reported-by: Petru Mihancea <petrum@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agorapidio: use a reference count for struct mport_dma_req
Ioan Nicu [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:10 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
rapidio: use a reference count for struct mport_dma_req

Once the dma request is passed to the DMA engine, the DMA subsystem
would hold a pointer to this structure and could call the completion
callback after do_dma_request() has timed out.

The current code deals with this by putting timed out SYNC requests to a
pending list and freeing them later, when the mport cdev device is
released.  This still does not guarantee that the DMA subsystem is
really done with those transfers, so in theory
dma_xfer_callback/dma_req_free could be called after
mport_cdev_release_dma and could potentially access already freed
memory.

This patch simplifies the current handling by using a kref in the mport
dma request structure, so that it gets freed only when nobody uses it
anymore.

This also simplifies the code a bit, as FAF transfers are now handled in
the same way as SYNC and ASYNC transfers.  There is no need anymore for
the pending list and for the dma workqueue which was used in case of FAF
transfers, so we remove them both.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180405203342.GA16191@nokia.com
Signed-off-by: Ioan Nicu <ioan.nicu.ext@nokia.com>
Acked-by: Alexandre Bounine <alex.bou9@gmail.com>
Cc: Barry Wood <barry.wood@idt.com>
Cc: Matt Porter <mporter@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Christophe JAILLET <christophe.jaillet@wanadoo.fr>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Logan Gunthorpe <logang@deltatee.com>
Cc: Chris Wilson <chris@chris-wilson.co.uk>
Cc: Tvrtko Ursulin <tvrtko.ursulin@intel.com>
Cc: Frank Kunz <frank.kunz@nokia.com>
Cc: Alexander Sverdlin <alexander.sverdlin@nokia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agodrivers/rapidio/rio-scan.c: fix typo in comment
Vasyl Gomonovych [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:06 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
drivers/rapidio/rio-scan.c: fix typo in comment

Fix typo in the words 'receiver', 'specified', 'during'

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180321211035.8904-1-gomonovych@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Vasyl Gomonovych <gomonovych@gmail.com>
Cc: Matt Porter <mporter@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Alexandre Bounine <alexandre.bounine@idt.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoexec: pin stack limit during exec
Kees Cook [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:35:01 +0000 (16:35 -0700)]
exec: pin stack limit during exec

Since the stack rlimit is used in multiple places during exec and it can
be changed via other threads (via setrlimit()) or processes (via
prlimit()), the assumption that the value doesn't change cannot be made.
This leads to races with mm layout selection and argument size
calculations.  This changes the exec path to use the rlimit stored in
bprm instead of in current.  Before starting the thread, the bprm stack
rlimit is stored back to current.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1518638796-20819-4-git-send-email-keescook@chromium.org
Fixes: 64701dee4178e ("exec: Use sane stack rlimit under secureexec")
Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reported-by: Ben Hutchings <ben.hutchings@codethink.co.uk>
Reported-by: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Reported-by: Brad Spengler <spender@grsecurity.net>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Ben Hutchings <ben@decadent.org.uk>
Cc: Greg KH <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: "Jason A. Donenfeld" <Jason@zx2c4.com>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@redhat.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Cc: Willy Tarreau <w@1wt.eu>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoexec: introduce finalize_exec() before start_thread()
Kees Cook [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:34:57 +0000 (16:34 -0700)]
exec: introduce finalize_exec() before start_thread()

Provide a final callback into fs/exec.c before start_thread() takes
over, to handle any last-minute changes, like the coming restoration of
the stack limit.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1518638796-20819-3-git-send-email-keescook@chromium.org
Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Ben Hutchings <ben@decadent.org.uk>
Cc: Ben Hutchings <ben.hutchings@codethink.co.uk>
Cc: Brad Spengler <spender@grsecurity.net>
Cc: Greg KH <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: "Jason A. Donenfeld" <Jason@zx2c4.com>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@redhat.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Cc: Willy Tarreau <w@1wt.eu>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoexec: pass stack rlimit into mm layout functions
Kees Cook [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:34:53 +0000 (16:34 -0700)]
exec: pass stack rlimit into mm layout functions

Patch series "exec: Pin stack limit during exec".

Attempts to solve problems with the stack limit changing during exec
continue to be frustrated[1][2].  In addition to the specific issues
around the Stack Clash family of flaws, Andy Lutomirski pointed out[3]
other places during exec where the stack limit is used and is assumed to
be unchanging.  Given the many places it gets used and the fact that it
can be manipulated/raced via setrlimit() and prlimit(), I think the only
way to handle this is to move away from the "current" view of the stack
limit and instead attach it to the bprm, and plumb this down into the
functions that need to know the stack limits.  This series implements
the approach.

[1] 04e35f4495dd ("exec: avoid RLIMIT_STACK races with prlimit()")
[2] 779f4e1c6c7c ("Revert "exec: avoid RLIMIT_STACK races with prlimit()"")
[3] to security@kernel.org, "Subject: existing rlimit races?"

This patch (of 3):

Since it is possible that the stack rlimit can change externally during
exec (either via another thread calling setrlimit() or another process
calling prlimit()), provide a way to pass the rlimit down into the
per-architecture mm layout functions so that the rlimit can stay in the
bprm structure instead of sitting in the signal structure until exec is
finalized.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1518638796-20819-2-git-send-email-keescook@chromium.org
Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Ben Hutchings <ben@decadent.org.uk>
Cc: Willy Tarreau <w@1wt.eu>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@redhat.com>
Cc: "Jason A. Donenfeld" <Jason@zx2c4.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg KH <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Ben Hutchings <ben.hutchings@codethink.co.uk>
Cc: Brad Spengler <spender@grsecurity.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoseq_file: account everything to kmemcg
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:34:49 +0000 (16:34 -0700)]
seq_file: account everything to kmemcg

All it takes to open a file and read 1 byte from it.

seq_file will be allocated along with any private allocations, and more
importantly seq file buffer which is 1 page by default.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180310085252.GB17121@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Glauber Costa <glommer@gmail.com>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoseq_file: allocate seq_file from kmem_cache
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:34:45 +0000 (16:34 -0700)]
seq_file: allocate seq_file from kmem_cache

For fine-grained debugging and usercopy protection.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180310085027.GA17121@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Glauber Costa <glommer@gmail.com>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agofs/reiserfs/journal.c: add missing resierfs_warning() arg
Andrew Morton [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:34:41 +0000 (16:34 -0700)]
fs/reiserfs/journal.c: add missing resierfs_warning() arg

One use of the reiserfs_warning() macro in journal_init_dev() is missing
a parameter, causing the following warning:

  REISERFS warning (device loop0): journal_init_dev: Cannot open '%s': %i journal_init_dev:

This also causes a WARN_ONCE() warning in the vsprintf code, and then a
panic if panic_on_warn is set.

  Please remove unsupported %/ in format string
  WARNING: CPU: 1 PID: 4480 at lib/vsprintf.c:2138 format_decode+0x77f/0x830 lib/vsprintf.c:2138
  Kernel panic - not syncing: panic_on_warn set ...

Just add another string argument to the macro invocation.

Addresses https://syzkaller.appspot.com/bug?id=0627d4551fdc39bf1ef5d82cd9eef587047f7718

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/d678ebe1-6f54-8090-df4c-b9affad62293@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Reported-by: <syzbot+6bd77b88c1977c03f584@syzkaller.appspotmail.com>
Tested-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Acked-by: Jeff Mahoney <jeffm@suse.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoautofs4: use wait_event_killable
Matthew Wilcox [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:34:37 +0000 (16:34 -0700)]
autofs4: use wait_event_killable

This playing with signals to allow only fatal signals appears to predate
the introduction of wait_event_killable(), and I'm fairly sure that
wait_event_killable is what was meant to happen here.

[avagin@openvz.org: use wake_up() instead of wake_up_interruptible]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180331022839.21277-1-avagin@openvz.org
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180319191609.23880-1-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <mawilcox@microsoft.com>
Acked-by: Ian Kent <raven@themaw.net>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <mawilcox@microsoft.com>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoinit/ramdisk: use pr_cont() at the end of ramdisk loading
Aaro Koskinen [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:34:34 +0000 (16:34 -0700)]
init/ramdisk: use pr_cont() at the end of ramdisk loading

Use pr_cont() at the end of ramdisk loading.  This will avoid the
rotator and an extra newline appearing in the dmesg.

Before:
  RAMDISK: Loading 2436KiB [1 disk] into ram disk... |
  done.

After:
  RAMDISK: Loading 2436KiB [1 disk] into ram disk... done.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180302205552.16031-1-aaro.koskinen@iki.fi
Signed-off-by: Aaro Koskinen <aaro.koskinen@iki.fi>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: whinge about bool bitfields
Joe Perches [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:34:25 +0000 (16:34 -0700)]
checkpatch: whinge about bool bitfields

Using bool in a bitfield isn't a good idea as the alignment behavior is
arch implementation defined.

Suggest using unsigned int or u<8|16|32> instead.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/e22fb871b1b7f2fda4b22f3a24e0d7f092eb612c.camel@perches.com
Signed-off-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Suggested-by: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: allow space between colon and bracket
Heinrich Schuchardt [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:34:14 +0000 (16:34 -0700)]
checkpatch: allow space between colon and bracket

Allow a space between a colon and subsequent opening bracket.  This
sequence may occur in inline assembler statements like

asm(
"ldr %[out], [%[in]]\n\t"
: [out] "=r" (ret)
: [in] "r" (addr)
);

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180403191655.23700-1-xypron.glpk@gmx.de
Signed-off-by: Heinrich Schuchardt <xypron.glpk@gmx.de>
Acked-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: add test for assignment at start of line
Joe Perches [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:34:04 +0000 (16:34 -0700)]
checkpatch: add test for assignment at start of line

Kernel style seems to prefer line wrapping an assignment with the
assignment operator on the previous line like:

<leading tabs> identifier =
expression;
over
<leading tabs> identifier
= expression;

somewhere around a 50:1 ratio

$ git grep -P "[^=]=\s*$" -- "*.[ch]" | wc -l
52008
$ git grep -P "^\s+[\*\/\+\|\%\-]?=[^=>]" | wc -l
1161

So add a --strict test for that condition.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1522275726.2210.12.camel@perches.com
Signed-off-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: test SYMBOLIC_PERMS multiple times per line
Joe Perches [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:53 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
checkpatch: test SYMBOLIC_PERMS multiple times per line

There are occasions where symbolic perms are used in a ternary like

return (channel == 0) ? S_IRUGO | S_IWUSR : S_IRUGO;

The current test will find the first use "S_IRUGO | S_IWUSR" but not the
second use "S_IRUGO" on the same line.

Improve the test to look for all instances on a line.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1522127944.12357.49.camel@perches.com
Signed-off-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: two spelling fixes
Claudio Fontana [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:42 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
checkpatch: two spelling fixes

completly -> completely
wacking -> whacking

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1520405394-5586-1-git-send-email-claudio.fontana@gliwa.com
Signed-off-by: Claudio Fontana <claudio.fontana@gliwa.com>
Acked-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: improve get_quoted_string for TRACE_EVENT macros
Joe Perches [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:34 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
checkpatch: improve get_quoted_string for TRACE_EVENT macros

The get_quoted_string function does not expect invalid arguments.

The $stat test can return non-statements for complicated macros like
TRACE_EVENT.

Allow the $stat block and test for vsprintf misuses to exceed the actual
block length and possibly test invalid lines by validating the arguments
of get_quoted_string.

Return "" if either get_quoted_string argument is undefined.

Miscellanea:

o Properly align the comment for the vsprintf extension test

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/9e9725342ca3dfc0f5e3e0b8ca3c482b0e5712cc.1520356392.git.joe@perches.com
Signed-off-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Reported-by: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: warn for use of %px
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:31 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
checkpatch: warn for use of %px

Usage of the new %px specifier potentially leaks sensitive information.
Printing kernel addresses exposes the kernel layout in memory, this is
potentially exploitable.  We have tools in the kernel to help us do the
right thing.  We can have checkpatch warn developers of potential
dangers of using %px.

Have checkpatch emit a warning for usage of specifier %px.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519700648-23108-5-git-send-email-me@tobin.cc
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <me@tobin.cc>
Signed-off-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: add sub routine get_stat_here()
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:27 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
checkpatch: add sub routine get_stat_here()

checkpatch currently contains duplicate code.  We can define a sub
routine and call that instead.  This reduces code duplication and line
count.

Add subroutine get_stat_here().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519700648-23108-4-git-send-email-me@tobin.cc
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <me@tobin.cc>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: remove unused variable declarations
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:24 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
checkpatch: remove unused variable declarations

Variables are declared and not used, we should remove them.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519700648-23108-3-git-send-email-me@tobin.cc
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <me@tobin.cc>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: add sub routine get_stat_real()
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:20 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
checkpatch: add sub routine get_stat_real()

checkpatch currently contains duplicate code.  We can define a sub
routine and call that instead.  This reduces code duplication and line
count.

Add subroutine get_stat_real()

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519700648-23108-2-git-send-email-me@tobin.cc
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <me@tobin.cc>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: add Crypto ON_STACK to declaration_macros
Gilad Ben-Yossef [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:17 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
checkpatch: add Crypto ON_STACK to declaration_macros

Add the crypto API *_ON_STACK to $declaration_macros.

Resolves the following false warning:

WARNING: Missing a blank line after declarations
+ int err;
+ SHASH_DESC_ON_STACK(desc, ctx_p->shash_tfm);

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1518941636-4484-1-git-send-email-gilad@benyossef.com
Signed-off-by: Gilad Ben-Yossef <gilad@benyossef.com>
Signed-off-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Acked-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch.pl: add SPDX license tag check
Rob Herring [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:13 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
checkpatch.pl: add SPDX license tag check

Add SPDX license tag check based on the rules defined in
Documentation/process/license-rules.rst.  To summarize, SPDX license
tags should be on the 1st line (or 2nd line in scripts) using the
appropriate comment style for the file type.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180202154026.15298-1-robh@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Rob Herring <robh@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Acked-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Acked-by: Philippe Ombredanne <pombredanne@nexb.com>
Cc: Andy Whitcroft <apw@canonical.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Igor Stoppa <igor.stoppa@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agocheckpatch: improve parse_email signature checking
Joe Perches [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:09 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
checkpatch: improve parse_email signature checking

Bare email addresses with non alphanumeric characters require escape
quoting before being substituted in the parse_email routine.

e.g. Reported-by: syzbot+bbd8e9a06452cc48059b@syzkaller.appspotmail.com

Do so.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1518631805.3678.12.camel@perches.com
Signed-off-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agolib/list_debug.c: print unmangled addresses
Matthew Wilcox [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:06 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
lib/list_debug.c: print unmangled addresses

The entire point of printing the pointers in list_debug is to see if
there's any useful information in them (eg poison values, ASCII, etc);
obscuring them to see if they compare equal makes them much less useful.
If an attacker can force this message to be printed, we've already lost.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180401223237.GV13332@bombadil.infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <mawilcox@microsoft.com>
Reviewed-by: Tobin C. Harding <me@tobin.cc>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Eric Biggers <ebiggers3@gmail.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agolib/test_ubsan.c: make test_ubsan_misaligned_access() static
Colin Ian King [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:33:02 +0000 (16:33 -0700)]
lib/test_ubsan.c: make test_ubsan_misaligned_access() static

test_ubsan_misaligned_access() is local to the source and does not need
to be in global scope, so make it static.

Cleans up sparse warning:

  lib/test_ubsan.c:91:6: warning: symbol 'test_ubsan_misaligned_access' was not declared. Should it be static?

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180313103048.28513-1-colin.king@canonical.com
Signed-off-by: Colin Ian King <colin.king@canonical.com>
Cc: Jinbum Park <jinb.park7@gmail.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agolib: add testing module for UBSAN
Jinbum Park [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:58 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
lib: add testing module for UBSAN

This is a test module for UBSAN.  It triggers all undefined behaviors
that linux supports now, and detect them.

All test-cases have passed by compiling with gcc-5.5.0.

If use gcc-4.9.x, misaligned, out-of-bounds, object-size-mismatch will not
be detected.  Because gcc-4.9.x doesn't support them.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180309102247.GA2944@pjb1027-Latitude-E5410
Signed-off-by: Jinbum Park <jinb.park7@gmail.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agolib/test_bitmap.c: do not accidentally use stack VLA
Kees Cook [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:54 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
lib/test_bitmap.c: do not accidentally use stack VLA

This avoids an accidental stack VLA (since the compiler thinks the value
of "len" can change, even when marked "const").  This just replaces it
with a #define so it will DTRT.

Seen with -Wvla.  Fixed as part of the directive to remove all VLAs from
the kernel: https://lkml.org/lkml/2018/3/7/621

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180307212555.GA17927@beast
Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Yury Norov <ynorov@caviumnetworks.com>
Cc: Andy Shevchenko <andriy.shevchenko@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <mawilcox@microsoft.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agolib/Kconfig.debug: Debug Lockups and Hangs: keep SOFTLOCKUP options together
Randy Dunlap [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:51 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
lib/Kconfig.debug: Debug Lockups and Hangs: keep SOFTLOCKUP options together

Keep all of the SOFTLOCKUP kconfig symbols together (instead of
injecting the HARDLOCKUP symbols in the midst of them) so that the
config tools display them with their dependencies.

Tested with 'make {menuconfig/nconfig/gconfig/xconfig}'.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/6be2d9ed-4656-5b94-460d-7f051e2c7570@infradead.org
Fixes: 05a4a9527931 ("kernel/watchdog: split up config options")
Signed-off-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoMAINTAINERS: update email address for Alexandre Bounine
Alexandre Bounine [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:48 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
MAINTAINERS: update email address for Alexandre Bounine

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1522958149-6157-1-git-send-email-alex.bou9@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Bounine <alex.bou9@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Barry Wood <barry.wood@idt.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agotask_struct: only use anon struct under randstruct plugin
Kees Cook [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:44 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
task_struct: only use anon struct under randstruct plugin

The original intent for always adding the anonymous struct in
task_struct was to make sure we had compiler coverage.

However, this caused pathological padding of 40 bytes at the start of
task_struct.  Instead, move the anonymous struct to being only used when
struct layout randomization is enabled.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180327213609.GA2964@beast
Fixes: 29e48ce87f1e ("task_struct: Allow randomized")
Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reported-by: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoclang-format: add configuration file
Miguel Ojeda [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:40 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
clang-format: add configuration file

clang-format is a tool to format C/C++/...  code according to a set of
rules and heuristics.  Like most tools, it is not perfect nor covers
every single case, but it is good enough to be helpful.

In particular, it is useful for quickly re-formatting blocks of code
automatically, for reviewing full files in order to spot coding style
mistakes, typos and possible improvements.  It is also handy for sorting
``#includes``, for aligning variables and macros, for reflowing text and
other similar tasks.  It also serves as a teaching tool/guide for
newcomers.

The tool itself has been already included in the repositories of popular
Linux distributions for a long time.  The rules in this file are
intended for clang-format >= 4, which is easily available in most
distributions.

This commit adds the configuration file that contains the rules that the
tool uses to know how to format the code according to the kernel coding
style.  This gives us several advantages:

  * clang-format works out of the box with reasonable defaults;
    avoiding that everyone has to re-do the configuration.

  * Everyone agrees (eventually) on what is the most useful default
    configuration for most of the kernel.

  * If it becomes commonplace among kernel developers, clang-format
    may feel compelled to support us better. They already recognize
    the Linux kernel and its style in their documentation and in one
    of the style sub-options.

Some of clang-format's features relevant for the kernel are:

  * Uses clang's tooling support behind the scenes to parse and rewrite
    the code. It is not based on ad-hoc regexps.

  * Supports reasonably well the Linux kernel coding style.

  * Fast enough to be used at the press of a key.

  * There are already integrations (either built-in or third-party)
    for many common editors used by kernel developers (e.g. vim,
    emacs, Sublime, Atom...) that allow you to format an entire file
    or, more usefully, just your selection.

  * Able to parse unified diffs -- you can, for instance, reformat
    only the lines changed by a git commit.

  * Able to reflow text comments as well.

  * Widely supported and used by hundreds of developers in highly
    complex projects and organizations (e.g. the LLVM project itself,
    Chromium, WebKit, Google, Mozilla...). Therefore, it will be
    supported for a long time.

See more information about the tool at:

    https://clang.llvm.org/docs/ClangFormat.html
    https://clang.llvm.org/docs/ClangFormatStyleOptions.html

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180318171632.qfkemw3mwbcukth6@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <miguel.ojeda.sandonis@gmail.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Andy Whitcroft <apw@canonical.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agouts: create "struct uts_namespace" from kmem_cache
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:36 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
uts: create "struct uts_namespace" from kmem_cache

So "struct uts_namespace" can enjoy fine-grained SLAB debugging and
usercopy protection.

I'd prefer shorter name "utsns" but there is "user_namespace" already.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180228215158.GA23146@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: "Eric W. Biederman" <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Cc: Serge Hallyn <serge@hallyn.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agotaint: add taint for randstruct
Kees Cook [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:33 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
taint: add taint for randstruct

Since the randstruct plugin can intentionally produce extremely unusual
kernel structure layouts (even performance pathological ones), some
maintainers want to be able to trivially determine if an Oops is coming
from a randstruct-built kernel, so as to keep their sanity when
debugging.  This adds the new flag and initializes taint_mask
immediately when built with randstruct.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519084390-43867-4-git-send-email-keescook@chromium.org
Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agotaint: consolidate documentation
Kees Cook [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:29 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
taint: consolidate documentation

This consolidates the taint bit documentation into a single place with
both numeric and letter values.  Additionally adds the missing TAINT_AUX
documentation.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519084390-43867-3-git-send-email-keescook@chromium.org
Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agotaint: convert to indexed initialization
Kees Cook [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:26 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
taint: convert to indexed initialization

This converts to using indexed initializers instead of comments, adds a
comment on why the taint flags can't be an enum, and make sure that no
one forgets to update the taint_flags when adding new bits.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1519084390-43867-2-git-send-email-keescook@chromium.org
Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: selftests: test /proc/uptime
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:43:28 +0000 (16:43 -0700)]
proc: selftests: test /proc/uptime

The only tests I could come up with for /proc/uptime are:
 - test that values increase monotonically for 1 second,
 - bounce around CPUs and test the same thing.

Avoid glibc like plague for affinity given patches like this:
https://marc.info/?l=linux-kernel&m=152130031912594&w=4

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180317165235.GB3445@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: use slower rb_first()
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:20 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
proc: use slower rb_first()

In a typical for /proc "open+read+close" usecase, dentry is looked up
successfully on open only to be killed in dput() on close.  In fact
dentries which aren't /proc/*/...  and /proc/sys/* were almost NEVER
CACHED.  Simple printk in proc_lookup_de() shows that.

Now that ->delete hook intelligently picks which dentries should live in
dcache and which should not, rbtree caching is not necessary as dcache
does it job, at last!

As a side effect, struct proc_dir_entry shrinks by one pointer which can
go into inline name.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180314231032.GA15854@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Davidlohr Bueso <dbueso@suse.de>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <a.p.zijlstra@chello.nl>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: selftests: shotgun testing of read/readdir/readlink/write
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:46:19 +0000 (16:46 -0700)]
proc: selftests: shotgun testing of read/readdir/readlink/write

Perform reads with nearly everything in /proc, and some writing as well.

Hopefully memleak checkers and KASAN will find something.

[adobriyan@gmail.com: /proc/kmsg can and will block if read under root]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180316232147.GA20146@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
[adobriyan@gmail.com: /proc/sysrq-trigger lives on the ground floor]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180317164911.GA3445@avx2
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180315201251.GA12396@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: switch struct proc_dir_entry::count to refcount
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:14 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
proc: switch struct proc_dir_entry::count to refcount

->count is honest reference count unlike ->in_use.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180313174550.GA4332@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: reject "." and ".." as filenames
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:11 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
proc: reject "." and ".." as filenames

Various subsystems can create files and directories in /proc with names
directly controlled by userspace.

Which means "/", "." and ".." are no-no.

"/" split is already taken care of, do the other 2 prohibited names.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180310001223.GB12443@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Florian Westphal <fw@strlen.de>
Cc: Eric Dumazet <eric.dumazet@gmail.com>
Cc: Cong Wang <xiyou.wangcong@gmail.com>
Cc: Pavel Machek <pavel@ucw.cz>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: add selftest for last field of /proc/loadavg
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:42:23 +0000 (16:42 -0700)]
proc: add selftest for last field of /proc/loadavg

Test fork counter formerly known as ->last_pid, the only part of
/proc/loadavg which can be tested.

Testing in init pid namespace is not reliable because of background
activity.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180311152241.GA26247@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: do mmput ASAP for /proc/*/map_files
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:05 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
proc: do mmput ASAP for /proc/*/map_files

mm_struct is not needed while printing as all the data was already
extracted.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180309223120.GC3843@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: faster /proc/cmdline
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:32:01 +0000 (16:32 -0700)]
proc: faster /proc/cmdline

Use seq_puts() and skip format string processing.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180309222948.GB3843@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: register filesystem last
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:57 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: register filesystem last

As soon as register_filesystem() exits, filesystem can be mounted.  It
is better to present fully operational /proc.

Of course it doesn't matter because /proc is not modular but do it
anyway.

Drop error check, it should be handled by panicking.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180309222709.GA3843@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: fix /proc/*/map_files lookup some more
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:41:14 +0000 (16:41 -0700)]
proc: fix /proc/*/map_files lookup some more

I totally forgot that _parse_integer() accepts arbitrary amount of
leading zeroes leading to the following lookups:

OK
# readlink /proc/1/map_files/56427ecba000-56427eddc000
/lib/systemd/systemd

bogus
# readlink /proc/1/map_files/00000000000056427ecba000-56427eddc000
/lib/systemd/systemd
# readlink /proc/1/map_files/56427ecba000-00000000000056427eddc000
/lib/systemd/systemd

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180303215130.GA23480@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Cyrill Gorcunov <gorcunov@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Pavel Emelyanov <xemul@virtuozzo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: move "struct proc_dir_entry" into kmem cache
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:52 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: move "struct proc_dir_entry" into kmem cache

"struct proc_dir_entry" is variable sized because of 0-length trailing
array for name, however, because of SLAB padding allocations it is
possible to make "struct proc_dir_entry" fixed sized and allocate same
amount of memory.

It buys fine-grained debugging with poisoning and usercopy protection
which is not possible with kmalloc-* caches.

Currently, on 32-bit 91+ byte allocations go into kmalloc-128 and on
64-bit 147+ byte allocations go to kmalloc-192 anyway.

Additional memory is allocated only for 38/46+ byte long names which are
rare or may not even exist in the wild.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180223205504.GA17139@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: test /proc/self/syscall
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:48 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: test /proc/self/syscall

Read from /proc/self/syscall should yield read system call and correct
args in the output as current is reading /proc/self/syscall.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180226212145.GB742@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: test /proc/self/wchan
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:45 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: test /proc/self/wchan

This patch starts testing /proc.  Many more tests to come (I promise).

Read from /proc/self/wchan should always return "0" as current is in
TASK_RUNNING state while reading /proc/self/wchan.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180226212006.GA742@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agofs/proc/proc_sysctl.c: remove redundant link check in proc_sys_link_fill_cache()
Danilo Krummrich [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:41 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
fs/proc/proc_sysctl.c: remove redundant link check in proc_sys_link_fill_cache()

proc_sys_link_fill_cache() does not need to check whether we're called
for a link - it's already done by scan().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180228013506.4915-2-danilokrummrich@dk-develop.de
Signed-off-by: Danilo Krummrich <danilokrummrich@dk-develop.de>
Acked-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: "Eric W. Biederman" <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Cc: "Luis R . Rodriguez" <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agofs/proc/proc_sysctl.c: fix potential page fault while unregistering sysctl table
Danilo Krummrich [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:38 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
fs/proc/proc_sysctl.c: fix potential page fault while unregistering sysctl table

proc_sys_link_fill_cache() does not take currently unregistering sysctl
tables into account, which might result into a page fault in
sysctl_follow_link() - add a check to fix it.

This bug has been present since v3.4.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180228013506.4915-1-danilokrummrich@dk-develop.de
Fixes: 0e47c99d7fe25 ("sysctl: Replace root_list with links between sysctl_table_sets")
Signed-off-by: Danilo Krummrich <danilokrummrich@dk-develop.de>
Acked-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: "Luis R . Rodriguez" <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Cc: "Eric W. Biederman" <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: use set_puts() at /proc/*/wchan
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:34 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: use set_puts() at /proc/*/wchan

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180217072011.GB16074@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Andy Shevchenko <andy.shevchenko@gmail.com>
Cc: Rasmus Villemoes <rasmus.villemoes@prevas.dk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: check permissions earlier for /proc/*/wchan
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:30 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: check permissions earlier for /proc/*/wchan

get_wchan() accesses stack page before permissions are checked, let's
not play this game.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180217071923.GA16074@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Andy Shevchenko <andy.shevchenko@gmail.com>
Cc: Rasmus Villemoes <rasmus.villemoes@prevas.dk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: replace seq_printf by seq_put_smth to speed up /proc/pid/status
Andrei Vagin [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:26 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: replace seq_printf by seq_put_smth to speed up /proc/pid/status

seq_printf() works slower than seq_puts, seq_puts, etc.

== test_proc.c
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
int n, i, fd;
char buf[16384];

n = atoi(argv[1]);
for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
fd = open(argv[2], O_RDONLY);
if (fd < 0)
return 1;
if (read(fd, buf, sizeof(buf)) <= 0)
return 1;
close(fd);
}

return 0;
}
==

$ time ./test_proc  1000000 /proc/1/status

== Before path ==
real 0m5.171s
user 0m0.328s
sys 0m4.783s

== After patch ==
real 0m4.761s
user 0m0.334s
sys 0m4.366s

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180212074931.7227-4-avagin@openvz.org
Signed-off-by: Andrei Vagin <avagin@openvz.org>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: optimize single-symbol delimiters to spead up seq_put_decimal_ull
Andrei Vagin [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:23 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: optimize single-symbol delimiters to spead up seq_put_decimal_ull

A delimiter is a string which is printed before a number.  A
syngle-symbol delimiters can be printed by set_putc() and this works
faster than printing by set_puts().

== test_proc.c

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
int n, i, fd;
char buf[16384];

n = atoi(argv[1]);
for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
fd = open(argv[2], O_RDONLY);
if (fd < 0)
return 1;
if (read(fd, buf, sizeof(buf)) <= 0)
return 1;
close(fd);
}

return 0;
}
==

$ time ./test_proc  1000000 /proc/1/stat

== Before patch ==
  real 0m3.820s
  user 0m0.337s
  sys 0m3.394s

== After patch ==
  real 0m3.110s
  user 0m0.324s
  sys 0m2.700s

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180212074931.7227-3-avagin@openvz.org
Signed-off-by: Andrei Vagin <avagin@openvz.org>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: replace seq_printf on seq_putc to speed up /proc/pid/smaps
Andrei Vagin [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:19 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: replace seq_printf on seq_putc to speed up /proc/pid/smaps

seq_putc() works much faster than seq_printf()

== Before patch ==
  $ time python test_smaps.py
  real    0m3.828s
  user    0m0.413s
  sys     0m3.408s

== After patch ==
  $ time python test_smaps.py
  real 0m3.405s
  user 0m0.401s
  sys 0m3.003s

== Before patch ==
-   75.51%     4.62%  python   [kernel.kallsyms]    [k] show_smap.isra.33
   - 70.88% show_smap.isra.33
      + 24.82% seq_put_decimal_ull_aligned
      + 19.78% __walk_page_range
      + 12.74% seq_printf
      + 11.08% show_map_vma.isra.23
      + 1.68% seq_puts

== After patch ==
-   69.16%     5.70%  python   [kernel.kallsyms]    [k] show_smap.isra.33
   - 63.46% show_smap.isra.33
      + 25.98% seq_put_decimal_ull_aligned
      + 20.90% __walk_page_range
      + 12.60% show_map_vma.isra.23
        1.56% seq_putc
      + 1.55% seq_puts

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180212074931.7227-2-avagin@openvz.org
Signed-off-by: Andrei Vagin <avagin@openvz.org>
Reviewed-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: add seq_put_decimal_ull_width to speed up /proc/pid/smaps
Andrei Vagin [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:16 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: add seq_put_decimal_ull_width to speed up /proc/pid/smaps

seq_put_decimal_ull_w(m, str, val, width) prints a decimal number with a
specified minimal field width.

It is equivalent of seq_printf(m, "%s%*d", str, width, val), but it
works much faster.

== test_smaps.py
  num = 0
  with open("/proc/1/smaps") as f:
          for x in xrange(10000):
                  data = f.read()
                  f.seek(0, 0)
==

== Before patch ==
  $ time python test_smaps.py
  real    0m4.593s
  user    0m0.398s
  sys     0m4.158s

== After patch ==
  $ time python test_smaps.py
  real    0m3.828s
  user    0m0.413s
  sys     0m3.408s

$ perf -g record python test_smaps.py
== Before patch ==
-   79.01%     3.36%  python   [kernel.kallsyms]    [k] show_smap.isra.33
   - 75.65% show_smap.isra.33
      + 48.85% seq_printf
      + 15.75% __walk_page_range
      + 9.70% show_map_vma.isra.23
        0.61% seq_puts

== After patch ==
-   75.51%     4.62%  python   [kernel.kallsyms]    [k] show_smap.isra.33
   - 70.88% show_smap.isra.33
      + 24.82% seq_put_decimal_ull_w
      + 19.78% __walk_page_range
      + 12.74% seq_printf
      + 11.08% show_map_vma.isra.23
      + 1.68% seq_puts

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix drivers/of/unittest.c build]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180212074931.7227-1-avagin@openvz.org
Signed-off-by: Andrei Vagin <avagin@openvz.org>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: account "struct pde_opener"
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:12 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: account "struct pde_opener"

The allocation is persistent in fact as any fool can open a file in
/proc and sit on it.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180214082409.GC17157@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@ZenIV.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: move "struct pde_opener" to kmem cache
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:09 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: move "struct pde_opener" to kmem cache

"struct pde_opener" is fixed size and we can have more granular approach
to debugging.

For those who don't know, per cache SLUB poisoning and red zoning don't
work if there is at least one object allocated which is hopeless in case
of kmalloc-64 but not in case of standalone cache.  Although systemd
opens 2 files from the get go, so it is hopeless after all.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180214082306.GB17157@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@ZenIV.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: randomize "struct pde_opener"
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:05 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: randomize "struct pde_opener"

The more the merrier.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180214081935.GA17157@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@ZenIV.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: faster open/close of files without ->release hook
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:31:01 +0000 (16:31 -0700)]
proc: faster open/close of files without ->release hook

The whole point of code in fs/proc/inode.c is to make sure ->release
hook is called either at close() or at rmmod time.

All if it is unnecessary if there is no ->release hook.

Save allocation+list manipulations under spinlock in that case.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180214063033.GA15579@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@ZenIV.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: move /proc/sysvipc creation to where it belongs
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:58 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
proc: move /proc/sysvipc creation to where it belongs

Move the proc_mkdir() call within the sysvipc subsystem such that we
avoid polluting proc_root_init() with petty cpp.

[dave@stgolabs.net: contributed changelog]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180216161732.GA10297@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Davidlohr Bueso <dave@stgolabs.net>
Cc: Manfred Spraul <manfred@colorfullife.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: do less stuff under ->pde_unload_lock
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:54 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
proc: do less stuff under ->pde_unload_lock

Commit ca469f35a8e9ef ("deal with races between remove_proc_entry() and
proc_reg_release()") moved too much stuff under ->pde_unload_lock making
a problem described at series "[PATCH v5] procfs: Improve Scaling in
proc" worse.

While RCU is being figured out, move kfree() out of ->pde_unload_lock.

On my potato, difference is only 0.5% speedup with concurrent
open+read+close of /proc/cmdline, but the effect should be more
noticeable on more capable machines.

$ perf stat -r 16 -- ./proc-j 16

 Performance counter stats for './proc-j 16' (16 runs):

     130569.502377      task-clock (msec)         #   15.872 CPUs utilized            ( +-  0.05% )
            19,169      context-switches          #    0.147 K/sec                    ( +-  0.18% )
                15      cpu-migrations            #    0.000 K/sec                    ( +-  3.27% )
               437      page-faults               #    0.003 K/sec                    ( +-  1.25% )
   300,172,097,675      cycles                    #    2.299 GHz                      ( +-  0.05% )
    96,793,267,308      instructions              #    0.32  insn per cycle           ( +-  0.04% )
    22,798,342,298      branches                  #  174.607 M/sec                    ( +-  0.04% )
       111,764,687      branch-misses             #    0.49% of all branches          ( +-  0.47% )

       8.226574400 seconds time elapsed                                          ( +-  0.05% )
       ^^^^^^^^^^^

$ perf stat -r 16 -- ./proc-j 16

 Performance counter stats for './proc-j 16' (16 runs):

     129866.777392      task-clock (msec)         #   15.869 CPUs utilized            ( +-  0.04% )
            19,154      context-switches          #    0.147 K/sec                    ( +-  0.66% )
                14      cpu-migrations            #    0.000 K/sec                    ( +-  1.73% )
               431      page-faults               #    0.003 K/sec                    ( +-  1.09% )
   298,556,520,546      cycles                    #    2.299 GHz                      ( +-  0.04% )
    96,525,366,833      instructions              #    0.32  insn per cycle           ( +-  0.04% )
    22,730,194,043      branches                  #  175.027 M/sec                    ( +-  0.04% )
       111,506,074      branch-misses             #    0.49% of all branches          ( +-  0.18% )

       8.183629778 seconds time elapsed                                          ( +-  0.04% )
       ^^^^^^^^^^^

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180213132911.GA24298@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoproc: get rid of task lock/unlock pair to read umask for the "status" file
Mateusz Guzik [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:51 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
proc: get rid of task lock/unlock pair to read umask for the "status" file

get_task_umask locks/unlocks the task on its own.  The only caller does
the same thing immediately after.

Utilize the fact the task has to be locked anyway and just do it once.
Since there are no other users and the code is short, fold it in.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1517995608-23683-1-git-send-email-mguzik@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Mateusz Guzik <mguzik@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Konstantin Khlebnikov <koct9i@gmail.com>
Cc: Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoprocfs: optimize seq_pad() to speed up /proc/pid/maps
Andrei Vagin [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:47 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
procfs: optimize seq_pad() to speed up /proc/pid/maps

seq_printf() is slow and it can be replaced by memset() in this case.

== test.py
  num = 0
  with open("/proc/1/maps") as f:
          while num < 10000 :
                  data = f.read()
                  f.seek(0, 0)
                  num = num + 1
==

== Before patch ==
  $  time python test.py
  real 0m0.986s
  user 0m0.279s
  sys 0m0.707s

== After patch ==
  $ time python test.py
  real 0m0.932s
  user 0m0.261s
  sys 0m0.669s

$ perf record -g python test.py
== Before patch ==
-   47.35%     3.38%  python   [kernel.kallsyms] [k] show_map_vma.isra.23
   - 43.97% show_map_vma.isra.23
      + 20.84% seq_path
      - 15.73% show_vma_header_prefix
      + 6.96% seq_pad
   + 2.94% __GI___libc_read

== After patch ==
-   44.01%     0.34%  python   [kernel.kallsyms] [k] show_pid_map
   - 43.67% show_pid_map
      - 42.91% show_map_vma.isra.23
         + 21.55% seq_path
         - 15.68% show_vma_header_prefix
         + 2.08% seq_pad
        0.55% seq_putc

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180112185812.7710-2-avagin@openvz.org
Signed-off-by: Andrei Vagin <avagin@openvz.org>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoprocfs: add seq_put_hex_ll to speed up /proc/pid/maps
Andrei Vagin [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:44 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
procfs: add seq_put_hex_ll to speed up /proc/pid/maps

seq_put_hex_ll() prints a number in hexadecimal notation and works
faster than seq_printf().

== test.py
  num = 0
  with open("/proc/1/maps") as f:
          while num < 10000 :
                  data = f.read()
                  f.seek(0, 0)
                 num = num + 1
==

== Before patch ==
  $  time python test.py

  real 0m1.561s
  user 0m0.257s
  sys 0m1.302s

== After patch ==
  $ time python test.py

  real 0m0.986s
  user 0m0.279s
  sys 0m0.707s

$ perf -g record python test.py:

== Before patch ==
-   67.42%     2.82%  python   [kernel.kallsyms] [k] show_map_vma.isra.22
   - 64.60% show_map_vma.isra.22
      - 44.98% seq_printf
         - seq_vprintf
            - vsnprintf
               + 14.85% number
               + 12.22% format_decode
                 5.56% memcpy_erms
      + 15.06% seq_path
      + 4.42% seq_pad
   + 2.45% __GI___libc_read

== After patch ==
-   47.35%     3.38%  python   [kernel.kallsyms] [k] show_map_vma.isra.23
   - 43.97% show_map_vma.isra.23
      + 20.84% seq_path
      - 15.73% show_vma_header_prefix
           10.55% seq_put_hex_ll
         + 2.65% seq_put_decimal_ull
           0.95% seq_putc
      + 6.96% seq_pad
   + 2.94% __GI___libc_read

[avagin@openvz.org: use unsigned int instead of int where it is suitable]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180214025619.4005-1-avagin@openvz.org
[avagin@openvz.org: v2]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180117082050.25406-1-avagin@openvz.org
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180112185812.7710-1-avagin@openvz.org
Signed-off-by: Andrei Vagin <avagin@openvz.org>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agokasan: prevent compiler from optimizing away memset in tests
Andrey Konovalov [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:39 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
kasan: prevent compiler from optimizing away memset in tests

A compiler can optimize away memset calls by replacing them with mov
instructions.  There are KASAN tests that specifically test that KASAN
correctly handles memset calls so we don't want this optimization to
happen.

The solution is to add -fno-builtin flag to test_kasan.ko

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/105ec9a308b2abedb1a0d1fdced0c22d765e4732.1519924383.git.andreyknvl@google.com
Signed-off-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@google.com>
Acked-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Nick Terrell <terrelln@fb.com>
Cc: Chris Mason <clm@fb.com>
Cc: Yury Norov <ynorov@caviumnetworks.com>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: "Luis R . Rodriguez" <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@dabbelt.com>
Cc: "Paul E . McKenney" <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Jeff Layton <jlayton@redhat.com>
Cc: "Jason A . Donenfeld" <Jason@zx2c4.com>
Cc: Kostya Serebryany <kcc@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agokasan: fix invalid-free test crashing the kernel
Andrey Konovalov [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:35 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
kasan: fix invalid-free test crashing the kernel

When an invalid-free is triggered by one of the KASAN tests, the object
doesn't actually get freed.  This later leads to a BUG failure in
kmem_cache_destroy that checks that there are no allocated objects in
the cache that is being destroyed.

Fix this by calling kmem_cache_free with the proper object address after
the call that triggers invalid-free.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/286eaefc0a6c3fa9b83b87e7d6dc0fbb5b5c9926.1519924383.git.andreyknvl@google.com
Signed-off-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@google.com>
Acked-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Nick Terrell <terrelln@fb.com>
Cc: Chris Mason <clm@fb.com>
Cc: Yury Norov <ynorov@caviumnetworks.com>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: "Luis R . Rodriguez" <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@dabbelt.com>
Cc: "Paul E . McKenney" <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Jeff Layton <jlayton@redhat.com>
Cc: "Jason A . Donenfeld" <Jason@zx2c4.com>
Cc: Kostya Serebryany <kcc@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agokasan, slub: fix handling of kasan_slab_free hook
Andrey Konovalov [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:31 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
kasan, slub: fix handling of kasan_slab_free hook

The kasan_slab_free hook's return value denotes whether the reuse of a
slab object must be delayed (e.g.  when the object is put into memory
qurantine).

The current way SLUB handles this hook is by ignoring its return value
and hardcoding checks similar (but not exactly the same) to the ones
performed in kasan_slab_free, which is prone to making mistakes.

The main difference between the hardcoded checks and the ones in
kasan_slab_free is whether we want to perform a free in case when an
invalid-free or a double-free was detected (we don't).

This patch changes the way SLUB handles this by:
1. taking into account the return value of kasan_slab_free for each of
   the objects, that are being freed;
2. reconstructing the freelist of objects to exclude the ones, whose
   reuse must be delayed.

[andreyknvl@google.com: eliminate unnecessary branch in slab_free]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/a62759a2545fddf69b0c034547212ca1eb1b3ce2.1520359686.git.andreyknvl@google.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/083f58501e54731203801d899632d76175868e97.1519400992.git.andreyknvl@google.com
Signed-off-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@google.com>
Acked-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Kostya Serebryany <kcc@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomm/thp: don't count ZONE_MOVABLE as the target for freepage reserving
Joonsoo Kim [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:27 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
mm/thp: don't count ZONE_MOVABLE as the target for freepage reserving

There was a regression report for "mm/cma: manage the memory of the CMA
area by using the ZONE_MOVABLE" [1] and I think that it is related to
this problem.  CMA patchset makes the system use one more zone
(ZONE_MOVABLE) and then increases min_free_kbytes.  It reduces usable
memory and it could cause regression.

ZONE_MOVABLE only has movable pages so we don't need to keep enough
freepages to avoid or deal with fragmentation.  So, don't count it.

This changes min_free_kbytes and thus min_watermark greatly if
ZONE_MOVABLE is used.  It will make the user uses more memory.

System:
  22GB ram, fakenuma, 2 nodes. 5 zones are used.

Before:
  min_free_kbytes: 112640

  zone_info (min_watermark):
  Node 0, zone      DMA
          min      19
  Node 0, zone    DMA32
          min      3778
  Node 0, zone   Normal
          min      10191
  Node 0, zone  Movable
          min      0
  Node 0, zone   Device
          min      0
  Node 1, zone      DMA
          min      0
  Node 1, zone    DMA32
          min      0
  Node 1, zone   Normal
          min      14043
  Node 1, zone  Movable
          min      127
  Node 1, zone   Device
          min      0

After:
  min_free_kbytes: 90112

  zone_info (min_watermark):
  Node 0, zone      DMA
          min      15
  Node 0, zone    DMA32
          min      3022
  Node 0, zone   Normal
          min      8152
  Node 0, zone  Movable
          min      0
  Node 0, zone   Device
          min      0
  Node 1, zone      DMA
          min      0
  Node 1, zone    DMA32
          min      0
  Node 1, zone   Normal
          min      11234
  Node 1, zone  Movable
          min      102
  Node 1, zone   Device
          min      0

[1] (lkml.kernel.org/r/20180102063528.GG30397%20()%20yexl-desktop)

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1522913236-15776-1-git-send-email-iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com
Signed-off-by: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoARM: CMA: avoid double mapping to the CMA area if CONFIG_HIGHMEM=y
Joonsoo Kim [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:23 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
ARM: CMA: avoid double mapping to the CMA area if CONFIG_HIGHMEM=y

CMA area is now managed by the separate zone, ZONE_MOVABLE, to fix many
MM related problems.  In this implementation, if CONFIG_HIGHMEM = y,
then ZONE_MOVABLE is considered as HIGHMEM and the memory of the CMA
area is also considered as HIGHMEM.  That means that they are considered
as the page without direct mapping.  However, CMA area could be in a
lowmem and the memory could have direct mapping.

In ARM, when establishing a new mapping for DMA, direct mapping should
be cleared since two mapping with different cache policy could cause
unknown problem.  With this patch, PageHighmem() for the CMA memory
located in lowmem returns true so that the function for DMA mapping
cannot notice whether it needs to clear direct mapping or not,
correctly.  To handle this situation, this patch always clears direct
mapping for such CMA memory.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1512114786-5085-4-git-send-email-iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com
Signed-off-by: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Tested-by: Tony Lindgren <tony@atomide.com>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K . V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Laura Abbott <lauraa@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Marek Szyprowski <m.szyprowski@samsung.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Michal Nazarewicz <mina86@mina86.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomm/cma: remove ALLOC_CMA
Joonsoo Kim [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:19 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
mm/cma: remove ALLOC_CMA

Now, all reserved pages for CMA region are belong to the ZONE_MOVABLE
and it only serves for a request with GFP_HIGHMEM && GFP_MOVABLE.

Therefore, we don't need to maintain ALLOC_CMA at all.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1512114786-5085-3-git-send-email-iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com
Signed-off-by: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Reviewed-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Tested-by: Tony Lindgren <tony@atomide.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Laura Abbott <lauraa@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Marek Szyprowski <m.szyprowski@samsung.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Michal Nazarewicz <mina86@mina86.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomm/cma: manage the memory of the CMA area by using the ZONE_MOVABLE
Joonsoo Kim [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:15 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
mm/cma: manage the memory of the CMA area by using the ZONE_MOVABLE

Patch series "mm/cma: manage the memory of the CMA area by using the
ZONE_MOVABLE", v2.

0. History

This patchset is the follow-up of the discussion about the "Introduce
ZONE_CMA (v7)" [1].  Please reference it if more information is needed.

1. What does this patch do?

This patch changes the management way for the memory of the CMA area in
the MM subsystem.  Currently the memory of the CMA area is managed by
the zone where their pfn is belong to.  However, this approach has some
problems since MM subsystem doesn't have enough logic to handle the
situation that different characteristic memories are in a single zone.
To solve this issue, this patch try to manage all the memory of the CMA
area by using the MOVABLE zone.  In MM subsystem's point of view,
characteristic of the memory on the MOVABLE zone and the memory of the
CMA area are the same.  So, managing the memory of the CMA area by using
the MOVABLE zone will not have any problem.

2. Motivation

There are some problems with current approach.  See following.  Although
these problem would not be inherent and it could be fixed without this
conception change, it requires many hooks addition in various code path
and it would be intrusive to core MM and would be really error-prone.
Therefore, I try to solve them with this new approach.  Anyway,
following is the problems of the current implementation.

o CMA memory utilization

First, following is the freepage calculation logic in MM.

 - For movable allocation: freepage = total freepage
 - For unmovable allocation: freepage = total freepage - CMA freepage

Freepages on the CMA area is used after the normal freepages in the zone
where the memory of the CMA area is belong to are exhausted.  At that
moment that the number of the normal freepages is zero, so

 - For movable allocation: freepage = total freepage = CMA freepage
 - For unmovable allocation: freepage = 0

If unmovable allocation comes at this moment, allocation request would
fail to pass the watermark check and reclaim is started.  After reclaim,
there would exist the normal freepages so freepages on the CMA areas
would not be used.

FYI, there is another attempt [2] trying to solve this problem in lkml.
And, as far as I know, Qualcomm also has out-of-tree solution for this
problem.

Useless reclaim:

There is no logic to distinguish CMA pages in the reclaim path.  Hence,
CMA page is reclaimed even if the system just needs the page that can be
usable for the kernel allocation.

Atomic allocation failure:

This is also related to the fallback allocation policy for the memory of
the CMA area.  Consider the situation that the number of the normal
freepages is *zero* since the bunch of the movable allocation requests
come.  Kswapd would not be woken up due to following freepage
calculation logic.

- For movable allocation: freepage = total freepage = CMA freepage

If atomic unmovable allocation request comes at this moment, it would
fails due to following logic.

- For unmovable allocation: freepage = total freepage - CMA freepage = 0

It was reported by Aneesh [3].

Useless compaction:

Usual high-order allocation request is unmovable allocation request and
it cannot be served from the memory of the CMA area.  In compaction,
migration scanner try to migrate the page in the CMA area and make
high-order page there.  As mentioned above, it cannot be usable for the
unmovable allocation request so it's just waste.

3. Current approach and new approach

Current approach is that the memory of the CMA area is managed by the
zone where their pfn is belong to.  However, these memory should be
distinguishable since they have a strong limitation.  So, they are
marked as MIGRATE_CMA in pageblock flag and handled specially.  However,
as mentioned in section 2, the MM subsystem doesn't have enough logic to
deal with this special pageblock so many problems raised.

New approach is that the memory of the CMA area is managed by the
MOVABLE zone.  MM already have enough logic to deal with special zone
like as HIGHMEM and MOVABLE zone.  So, managing the memory of the CMA
area by the MOVABLE zone just naturally work well because constraints
for the memory of the CMA area that the memory should always be
migratable is the same with the constraint for the MOVABLE zone.

There is one side-effect for the usability of the memory of the CMA
area.  The use of MOVABLE zone is only allowed for a request with
GFP_HIGHMEM && GFP_MOVABLE so now the memory of the CMA area is also
only allowed for this gfp flag.  Before this patchset, a request with
GFP_MOVABLE can use them.  IMO, It would not be a big issue since most
of GFP_MOVABLE request also has GFP_HIGHMEM flag.  For example, file
cache page and anonymous page.  However, file cache page for blockdev
file is an exception.  Request for it has no GFP_HIGHMEM flag.  There is
pros and cons on this exception.  In my experience, blockdev file cache
pages are one of the top reason that causes cma_alloc() to fail
temporarily.  So, we can get more guarantee of cma_alloc() success by
discarding this case.

Note that there is no change in admin POV since this patchset is just
for internal implementation change in MM subsystem.  Just one minor
difference for admin is that the memory stat for CMA area will be
printed in the MOVABLE zone.  That's all.

4. Result

Following is the experimental result related to utilization problem.

8 CPUs, 1024 MB, VIRTUAL MACHINE
make -j16

<Before>
  CMA area:               0 MB            512 MB
  Elapsed-time:           92.4 186.5
  pswpin:                 82 18647
  pswpout:                160 69839

<After>
  CMA        :            0 MB            512 MB
  Elapsed-time:           93.1 93.4
  pswpin:                 84 46
  pswpout:                183 92

akpm: "kernel test robot" reported a 26% improvement in
vm-scalability.throughput:
http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180330012721.GA3845@yexl-desktop

[1]: lkml.kernel.org/r/1491880640-9944-1-git-send-email-iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com
[2]: https://lkml.org/lkml/2014/10/15/623
[3]: http://www.spinics.net/lists/linux-mm/msg100562.html

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1512114786-5085-2-git-send-email-iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com
Signed-off-by: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Reviewed-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Tested-by: Tony Lindgren <tony@atomide.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Laura Abbott <lauraa@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Marek Szyprowski <m.szyprowski@samsung.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Michal Nazarewicz <mina86@mina86.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomm/page_alloc: don't reserve ZONE_HIGHMEM for ZONE_MOVABLE request
Joonsoo Kim [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:11 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
mm/page_alloc: don't reserve ZONE_HIGHMEM for ZONE_MOVABLE request

Freepage on ZONE_HIGHMEM doesn't work for kernel memory so it's not that
important to reserve.  When ZONE_MOVABLE is used, this problem would
theorectically cause to decrease usable memory for GFP_HIGHUSER_MOVABLE
allocation request which is mainly used for page cache and anon page
allocation.  So, fix it by setting 0 to
sysctl_lowmem_reserve_ratio[ZONE_HIGHMEM].

And, defining sysctl_lowmem_reserve_ratio array by MAX_NR_ZONES - 1 size
makes code complex.  For example, if there is highmem system, following
reserve ratio is activated for *NORMAL ZONE* which would be easyily
misleading people.

 #ifdef CONFIG_HIGHMEM
 32
 #endif

This patch also fixes this situation by defining
sysctl_lowmem_reserve_ratio array by MAX_NR_ZONES and place "#ifdef" to
right place.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1504672525-17915-1-git-send-email-iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com
Signed-off-by: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Reviewed-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Tested-by: Tony Lindgren <tony@atomide.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K . V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Cc: Laura Abbott <lauraa@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Marek Szyprowski <m.szyprowski@samsung.com>
Cc: Michal Nazarewicz <mina86@mina86.com>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: <linux-api@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomm: unclutter THP migration
Michal Hocko [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:07 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
mm: unclutter THP migration

THP migration is hacked into the generic migration with rather
surprising semantic.  The migration allocation callback is supposed to
check whether the THP can be migrated at once and if that is not the
case then it allocates a simple page to migrate.  unmap_and_move then
fixes that up by spliting the THP into small pages while moving the head
page to the newly allocated order-0 page.  Remaning pages are moved to
the LRU list by split_huge_page.  The same happens if the THP allocation
fails.  This is really ugly and error prone [1].

I also believe that split_huge_page to the LRU lists is inherently wrong
because all tail pages are not migrated.  Some callers will just work
around that by retrying (e.g.  memory hotplug).  There are other pfn
walkers which are simply broken though.  e.g. madvise_inject_error will
migrate head and then advances next pfn by the huge page size.
do_move_page_to_node_array, queue_pages_range (migrate_pages, mbind),
will simply split the THP before migration if the THP migration is not
supported then falls back to single page migration but it doesn't handle
tail pages if the THP migration path is not able to allocate a fresh THP
so we end up with ENOMEM and fail the whole migration which is a
questionable behavior.  Page compaction doesn't try to migrate large
pages so it should be immune.

This patch tries to unclutter the situation by moving the special THP
handling up to the migrate_pages layer where it actually belongs.  We
simply split the THP page into the existing list if unmap_and_move fails
with ENOMEM and retry.  So we will _always_ migrate all THP subpages and
specific migrate_pages users do not have to deal with this case in a
special way.

[1] http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20171121021855.50525-1-zi.yan@sent.com

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180103082555.14592-4-mhocko@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <zi.yan@cs.rutgers.edu>
Cc: Andrea Reale <ar@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <khandual@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomm, migrate: remove reason argument from new_page_t
Michal Hocko [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:30:03 +0000 (16:30 -0700)]
mm, migrate: remove reason argument from new_page_t

No allocation callback is using this argument anymore.  new_page_node
used to use this parameter to convey node_id resp.  migration error up
to move_pages code (do_move_page_to_node_array).  The error status never
made it into the final status field and we have a better way to
communicate node id to the status field now.  All other allocation
callbacks simply ignored the argument so we can drop it finally.

[mhocko@suse.com: fix migration callback]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180105085259.GH2801@dhcp22.suse.cz
[akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alloc_misplaced_dst_page()]
[mhocko@kernel.org: fix build]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180103091134.GB11319@dhcp22.suse.cz
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180103082555.14592-3-mhocko@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <zi.yan@cs.rutgers.edu>
Cc: Andrea Reale <ar@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <khandual@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomm, numa: rework do_pages_move
Michal Hocko [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:29:59 +0000 (16:29 -0700)]
mm, numa: rework do_pages_move

Patch series "unclutter thp migration"

Motivation:

THP migration is hacked into the generic migration with rather
surprising semantic.  The migration allocation callback is supposed to
check whether the THP can be migrated at once and if that is not the
case then it allocates a simple page to migrate.  unmap_and_move then
fixes that up by splitting the THP into small pages while moving the
head page to the newly allocated order-0 page.  Remaining pages are
moved to the LRU list by split_huge_page.  The same happens if the THP
allocation fails.  This is really ugly and error prone [2].

I also believe that split_huge_page to the LRU lists is inherently wrong
because all tail pages are not migrated.  Some callers will just work
around that by retrying (e.g.  memory hotplug).  There are other pfn
walkers which are simply broken though.  e.g. madvise_inject_error will
migrate head and then advances next pfn by the huge page size.
do_move_page_to_node_array, queue_pages_range (migrate_pages, mbind),
will simply split the THP before migration if the THP migration is not
supported then falls back to single page migration but it doesn't handle
tail pages if the THP migration path is not able to allocate a fresh THP
so we end up with ENOMEM and fail the whole migration which is a
questionable behavior.  Page compaction doesn't try to migrate large
pages so it should be immune.

The first patch reworks do_pages_move which relies on a very ugly
calling semantic when the return status is pushed to the migration path
via private pointer.  It uses pre allocated fixed size batching to
achieve that.  We simply cannot do the same if a THP is to be split
during the migration path which is done in the patch 3.  Patch 2 is
follow up cleanup which removes the mentioned return status calling
convention ugliness.

On a side note:

There are some semantic issues I have encountered on the way when
working on patch 1 but I am not addressing them here.  E.g. trying to
move THP tail pages will result in either success or EBUSY (the later
one more likely once we isolate head from the LRU list).  Hugetlb
reports EACCESS on tail pages.  Some errors are reported via status
parameter but migration failures are not even though the original
`reason' argument suggests there was an intention to do so.  From a
quick look into git history this never worked.  I have tried to keep the
semantic unchanged.

Then there is a relatively minor thing that the page isolation might
fail because of pages not being on the LRU - e.g. because they are
sitting on the per-cpu LRU caches.  Easily fixable.

This patch (of 3):

do_pages_move is supposed to move user defined memory (an array of
addresses) to the user defined numa nodes (an array of nodes one for
each address).  The user provided status array then contains resulting
numa node for each address or an error.  The semantic of this function
is little bit confusing because only some errors are reported back.
Notably migrate_pages error is only reported via the return value.  This
patch doesn't try to address these semantic nuances but rather change
the underlying implementation.

Currently we are processing user input (which can be really large) in
batches which are stored to a temporarily allocated page.  Each address
is resolved to its struct page and stored to page_to_node structure
along with the requested target numa node.  The array of these
structures is then conveyed down the page migration path via private
argument.  new_page_node then finds the corresponding structure and
allocates the proper target page.

What is the problem with the current implementation and why to change
it? Apart from being quite ugly it also doesn't cope with unexpected
pages showing up on the migration list inside migrate_pages path.  That
doesn't happen currently but the follow up patch would like to make the
thp migration code more clear and that would need to split a THP into
the list for some cases.

How does the new implementation work? Well, instead of batching into a
fixed size array we simply batch all pages that should be migrated to
the same node and isolate all of them into a linked list which doesn't
require any additional storage.  This should work reasonably well
because page migration usually migrates larger ranges of memory to a
specific node.  So the common case should work equally well as the
current implementation.  Even if somebody constructs an input where the
target numa nodes would be interleaved we shouldn't see a large
performance impact because page migration alone doesn't really benefit
from batching.  mmap_sem batching for the lookup is quite questionable
and isolate_lru_page which would benefit from batching is not using it
even in the current implementation.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180103082555.14592-2-mhocko@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <khandual@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <zi.yan@cs.rutgers.edu>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Reale <ar@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomm/swapfile.c: make pointer swap_avail_heads static
Colin Ian King [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:29:55 +0000 (16:29 -0700)]
mm/swapfile.c: make pointer swap_avail_heads static

The pointer swap_avail_heads is local to the source and does not need to
be in global scope, so make it static.

Cleans up sparse warning:

  mm/swapfile.c:88:19: warning: symbol 'swap_avail_heads' was not declared. Should it be static?

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180206215836.12366-1-colin.king@canonical.com
Signed-off-by: Colin Ian King <colin.king@canonical.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agomemcg: fix per_node_info cleanup
Michal Hocko [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:29:52 +0000 (16:29 -0700)]
memcg: fix per_node_info cleanup

syzbot has triggered a NULL ptr dereference when allocation fault
injection enforces a failure and alloc_mem_cgroup_per_node_info
initializes memcg->nodeinfo only half way through.

But __mem_cgroup_free still tries to free all per-node data and
dereferences pn->lruvec_stat_cpu unconditioanlly even if the specific
per-node data hasn't been initialized.

The bug is quite unlikely to hit because small allocations do not fail
and we would need quite some numa nodes to make struct
mem_cgroup_per_node large enough to cross the costly order.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180406100906.17790-1-mhocko@kernel.org
Reported-by: syzbot+8a5de3cce7cdc70e9ebe@syzkaller.appspotmail.com
Fixes: 00f3ca2c2d66 ("mm: memcontrol: per-lruvec stats infrastructure")
Signed-off-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
3 years agoswap: divide-by-zero when zero length swap file on ssd
Tom Abraham [Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:29:48 +0000 (16:29 -0700)]
swap: divide-by-zero when zero length swap file on ssd

Calling swapon() on a zero length swap file on SSD can lead to a
divide-by-zero.

Although creating such files isn't possible with mkswap and they woud be
considered invalid, it would be better for the swapon code to be more
robust and handle this condition gracefully (return -EINVAL).
Especially since the fix is small and straightforward.

To help with wear leveling on SSD, the swapon syscall calculates a
random position in the swap file using modulo p->highest_bit, which is
set to maxpages - 1 in read_swap_header.

If the swap file is zero length, read_swap_header sets maxpages=1 and
last_page=0, resulting in p->highest_bit=0 and we divide-by-zero when we
modulo p->highest_bit in swapon syscall.

This can be prevented by having read_swap_header return zero if
last_page is zero.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/5AC747C1020000A7001FA82C@prv-mh.provo.novell.com
Signed-off-by: Thomas Abraham <tabraham@suse.com>
Reported-by: <Mark.Landis@Teradata.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>